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Saltwater Invasion

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posted on Nov, 25 2020 @ 12:35 PM
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Hello there, ATS. This is an important issue at our doorstep that needs to be dealt with. I read an article concerning what's being called an "invisible flood" as saltwater is creeping inland, destroying crops and creating an impending danger to freshwater supplies. It is being said in some the articles I've read that scientists are sounding the alarm about this saltwater intrusion which is due to rising seas.




New scientific research along the East Coast and in California shows measurable and sometimes startling change, much of it from saltwater’s unseen advance beneath the surface. The threat is widespread; roughly 40% of Americans live in coastal counties, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Among the Howard Center’s findings:

— Thousands of acres of farmland have gone out of production as salt imparts its ruinous properties to croplands. A single county in southern Maryland has lost more than 2 square miles of farm-rich uplands while in California, planners in the fertile Central Valley are fighting to stem losses from historic salt deposits that already total 250,000 acres

— Drinking water supplies in public aquifers and private wells from Long Island, New York, to the Florida Keys are increasingly threatened as some underground sources reach salinity levels nearly equal to seawater. In Miami-Dade County, Florida, homeowners and businesses can expect their water and sewer bills to rise 5% every year through at least the next decade, said Water and Sewer Director Kevin Lynskey.

— In South Florida, nearly one-third of 215 monitoring wells showed a five-year trend of increasing salinity with just 16 showing a downward salinity trend, according to a Howard Center analysis of U.S. Geological Survey test results. The problem is compounded by a massive saltwater plume radiating from the Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Station toward wellfields in the Biscayne aquifer that supply drinking water in the Miami area.

— Coastal wetlands, a buffer against more frequent storms and a sink to capture carbon, are fast disappearing. In Maryland, Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge already has seen 5,000 acres of wetland disappear. In Louisiana -- which loses nearly 30 square miles of coastal marsh yearly -- a study concludes that remaining wetlands could be gone within 50 years.

— “Ghost forests” of dead and dying trees are spreading along coastlines from New Jersey to the Gulf of Mexico as saltwater pummels from above and seeps in from beneath.

In September, the National Science Foundation awarded University of Maryland agroecologist Kate Tully and her partners a $4.3 million grant to study saltwater intrusion — a measure of scientific concern about the problem.

In a TEDx talk she delivered in September, Tully said that “many people are unaware, but there is aninvisible flood moving far inland in advance of the surface floods that can drown our homes.”


The USGS mentions increased saltwater intrusion in Florida but says that it's monitoring the "growing concern for coastal communities." One of the articles I read says that saltwater encroaches inland underground before surface-water encroaches above-land hence the name "Invisible Flood." Right now this issue is of concern to coastal areas but the danger to crops and freshwater will affect everyone nationwide. The original article is a Yahoo article so I also posted some articles from other sources just to have other sources for confirmation. So, what says ATS?

www.yahoo.com...

cnsmaryland.org...

cnsmaryland.org...

www.ecori.org...

www.usgs.gov...-science_center_objects
edit on 25-11-2020 by lostbook because: word change

edit on 25-11-2020 by lostbook because: paragraph edit



posted on Nov, 25 2020 @ 12:51 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

This sounds like people living beside a river complaining that their land was flooded.


+1 more 
posted on Nov, 25 2020 @ 12:53 PM
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Sounds like people sucking water out of the underground water system creating a vacuum that needs to be filled by the nearest available source.



posted on Nov, 25 2020 @ 12:53 PM
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a reply to: lostbook
A fairly cursory reading of Hindu texts enumerate any number of cities inundated by the sea.

The Mediterranian, the Black Sea, every coast over time, inundates. We humans, with our little egos, look at specks of time and attribute momentous observations as relative to us from our little speck of observation.




edit on 25-11-2020 by BlueJacket because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2020 @ 01:00 PM
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originally posted by: Bluntone22
a reply to: lostbook

This sounds like people living beside a river complaining that their land was flooded.



So, you don't care?



posted on Nov, 25 2020 @ 01:01 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

No, it's from rising seas.



posted on Nov, 25 2020 @ 01:03 PM
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a reply to: BlueJacket

It's par for the course?



posted on Nov, 25 2020 @ 01:07 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

I'd say its more from people using excessive amounts of ground water from wells. My city used a well but drew so much water it was at risk of drawing in the sea water from the bay and had to significantly reduce the amount they were drawing from it.



posted on Nov, 25 2020 @ 01:14 PM
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a reply to: enament

It could be a localized reason as is a Nuclear power plant in NJ, i think. However, the overall reason that i gather from articles is rising seas.



posted on Nov, 25 2020 @ 01:33 PM
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originally posted by: lostbook

originally posted by: Bluntone22
a reply to: lostbook

This sounds like people living beside a river complaining that their land was flooded.



So, you don't care?



Would me caring change the situation?
Can it even be changed?



posted on Nov, 25 2020 @ 01:44 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
Sounds like people sucking water out of the underground water system creating a vacuum that needs to be filled by the nearest available source.



You are exactly right the more fresh water used the more it will be replaced wit salt water. These undergrond aquifers were never meant to sustain such large populations. every person uses about 167 litters a day. This would include washing bathing drinking and cooking. When a population is in the millions aquifers cannot keep up.



posted on Nov, 25 2020 @ 03:10 PM
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originally posted by: Bluntone22

originally posted by: lostbook

originally posted by: Bluntone22
a reply to: lostbook

This sounds like people living beside a river complaining that their land was flooded.



So, you don't care?



Would me caring change the situation?
Can it even be changed?


Yes! Your care would fill the Earth with so much love that the fresh water will flow and fill the reservoirs will fill with fresh water 💦

All kidding aside, we need more people willing to take action. Where there's a will, there's a way, right?



posted on Nov, 25 2020 @ 03:12 PM
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Only solution is to use up all the salt.
I volunteer to supersize my McDonalds fries to do my part. 🍟

I'm happy to take one for the team.



posted on Nov, 25 2020 @ 03:23 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

I think they are saying take the globalist climate agenda and stick it up their collective thanksgiving day turkeys.

We don’t want their taxes. No matter what sob or guilt story they lace it in.



posted on Nov, 25 2020 @ 05:48 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 




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