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The Justinian Plague (500s AD) estimated to have killed half the world's population

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posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 12:04 PM
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In earlier times this sixth-century pandemic was seen as a problem mostly of the Eastern Roman Empire, but we now know it was blasted across the world, shredding Eurasia through the silk road and reaching into Africa and southeast Asia.







The Justinian plague struck in the sixth century and is estimated to have killed between 30 and 50 million people—about half the world's population at that time—as it spread across Asia, North Africa, Arabia, and Europe


www.nationalgeographic.com...
edit on 11-11-2020 by Never Despise because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 12:19 PM
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And yet they want to make us believe our current "pandemic" is the worst humans have ever faced.

Probably because 0,00013 % has much more zeros in it than 50 %.




posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 12:29 PM
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Never heard of that one only the black plague or plauges I should say. Learn something new everyday. I know coronavirus is nothing compared to this. But it makes you wonder if history keeps repeating itself, only this time we have build up immunity or medicine to help stop it from being so deadly. Nice post I enjoyed reading that.



posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 12:30 PM
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a reply to: 772STi

There's a book called Justinian's Flea that deals with it. My understanding is that they think it may have been bubonic plague, but they aren't sure. There isn't any real forensic evidence left, so they're only operating off of accounts left over from the day of what the disease was like.


edit on 11-11-2020 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 12:34 PM
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a reply to: Never Despise

im sure that folks aren't going to like what i type here....

....but we need a depopulation as would be provided through large scale disease. While it would be incredibly painful for humans in multiple ways, it would do many positive things:


- allow the remaining humans to reshape the future world in ways that were not intellectually available until the 18th century
- restore the potential for our river systems to recharge with glacial growth
- restore aquifer systems, which are closely related to the river systems
- save and reinvigorate countless aquatic creatures
- reforest the continents

No, none of us wants to die, or lose loved ones. But its a reality of life on this planet, one which our scientific capabilities have seemed to over come in large part.



posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 12:37 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

I agree with you in part, it is a harsh reality, but at our current rate of population the earth won't be able to support all of us in the not to distant future. And we are not even toddlers on the time scale of the earth and sun. Just the blink of an eye cosmos time and we were here and gone.
edit on 11/11/2020 by 772STi because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 12:41 PM
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a reply to: 772STi

Im not misanthrope. Nor am I a madman. I am practical. We either need to get off the Earth, or reduce population.

And while population growth is projected to be net negative in the 1st world, the 3rd world is still creating children at an insane rate. Im all for Africa seeing the luxuries of civilization as we know it in Europe, America, and Australia (and Asia for that matter). But that is one place where population is growing faster than GDP. And its already a fairly heavily populated continent. And being honest, it makes me sad that the last range of actual wildlife might displace that wildlife. I get that Europe and the America's removed its large predators to provide us safety. And while i don't want to put Africa in a place worse than we are in...it is the last place you can actually find real large predators on Earth (outside a small piece of India with their almost nonexistant tiger population)



posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 01:00 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: Never Despise

im sure that folks aren't going to like what i type here....

....but we need a depopulation as would be provided through large scale disease. While it would be incredibly painful for humans in multiple ways, it would do many positive things:


- allow the remaining humans to reshape the future world in ways that were not intellectually available until the 18th century
- restore the potential for our river systems to recharge with glacial growth
- restore aquifer systems, which are closely related to the river systems
- save and reinvigorate countless aquatic creatures
- reforest the continents

No, none of us wants to die, or lose loved ones. But its a reality of life on this planet, one which our scientific capabilities have seemed to over come in large part.


I agree with you , It's Cold but it's true .

It's either de-population or Space colonization .

I have my doubts on the latter.



posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 01:08 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

Human cultural practice will always lag behind its technical ability. That's just the way it is.



posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 01:08 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

I'm sure that folks aren't going to like what I type here....but I agree entirely with what you said.

The biggest hurdles to overcome: Poverty and religious sensitivities.



posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 01:14 PM
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Since ATS has always been home to a sizable number of posters holding the view that "the depopulation agenda is an evil conspiracy", it's surprising to see the pro-depop posts.

Surprising but refreshing IMHO because it's a conversation that deserves to be had, even if one doesn't agree.
edit on 11-11-2020 by Never Despise because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 01:17 PM
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a reply to: Freeborn

Not in the slightest.

The issue is the reality of survival, not the things you cite. At our base, two people who hook up to breed do so with the expectation that they are furthering the species and their family lineage. In a third world style/subsistence situation, it often requires multiple children in order to ensure that two or more will survive to reach adulthood. Often cultural practices reflect that reality -- cultural practices include the things you mention like religious practice.

As technology increases and improves living standard and survival rates in offspring, cultural practices change far more slowly. You get second world countries where you have very large families living in poverty -- think Industrial Revolution English slums (Monty Python every sperm is sacred song). People still live as though the children won't make it to adulthood, but now far more of them are.

As things go on, you reach where many first world nations are where the pressure to have children is much reduced. IN such countries the birth rates tend to fall below replacement.

So it happens naturally over time. The question is only whether or not it will happen fast enough or at a pace the world can absorb.



posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 01:21 PM
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a reply to: Sanitarium79

The reason the current pandemic is the worst humans have ever faced is down to the transportation hubs and infrastructure we have in place around the globe combined with the incubation period of COVID 19.

It's a crippling combination that we have never really faced before aside from the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918.
edit on 11-11-2020 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 01:28 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan

im sure that folks aren't going to like what i type here....

....but we need a depopulation as would be provided through large scale disease. While it would be incredibly painful for humans in multiple ways, it would do many positive things:

none of us wants to die, or lose loved ones. But its a reality of life on this planet, one which our scientific capabilities have seemed to over come in large part.


As one of the vulnerable group I am going to agree with you the old in many

cases are being kept alive regardless.

There are exceptions of course.There are many people who are active for much

longer than others like Capt Tom Moore, an uncle of mine who died aged 104yrs

and was still driving at 100 yrs. my mother at 94 yrs who went into hospital with

a DNR as she would have come out needing nursing for a long time.

No one lives for ever.......

Quality is better than quantity......



posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 01:29 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake

I don't think the numbers yet suggest COVID is "the worst we have faced," but certainly the potential for the worst-ever in our time exists, because of unprecedented global linkage as you say, plus population size and density.

Another thing is that humans are penetrating wilderness at the highest rate ever, and gigantic numbers of unknown viruses and microorganisms exist in places like rainforests. Things our immune systems have never encountered.



posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 01:32 PM
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Yes we do need less people but I'd prefer nature to overwhelm us rather than some stuck up cabal who think they know better than the rest of the world. Nature's cull must be unbiased.
At this point I'd like to point out that I have a strange suspicion that the 'vaccine' will lead to a lot of dead people but the vaccine won't be blamed, it will be blamed on some other made up virus, which they have already mentioned a few times so that when people die we don't seem so surprised.

I mean even professional scientist can't just check for a virus. You must work in a bio lab, you must have a grant to test something [can't just bring your wife's spit in and check it out etc]. Do who can actually verify anything?



posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 01:36 PM
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a reply to: Never Despise

COVID 19 is not the worst deadly pathogen we have faced.

But the knock-on effects are something new to contend with given the 7.594 billion people on the planet and the way we interact and depend on one another to survive.

Let's stick to recorded history, as before that really is mad speculation where virus and the propagation of pathogens throughout our respective populations are concerned aka back when we were penetrating jungle and forest regions for the alleged first time.

Humans tend to do well next to clean water sources or on the flood plains which is as much of a curse as it is a positive attribute, both geographically, and from a virological biological standpoint.
edit on 11-11-2020 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 01:43 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: Never Despise

im sure that folks aren't going to like what i type here....

....but we need a depopulation as would be provided through large scale disease. While it would be incredibly painful for humans in multiple ways, it would do many positive things:


- allow the remaining humans to reshape the future world in ways that were not intellectually available until the 18th century
- restore the potential for our river systems to recharge with glacial growth
- restore aquifer systems, which are closely related to the river systems
- save and reinvigorate countless aquatic creatures
- reforest the continents

No, none of us wants to die, or lose loved ones. But its a reality of life on this planet, one which our scientific capabilities have seemed to over come in large part.


You're not getting my Infinity Stone.



posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 01:45 PM
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a reply to: Sanitarium79

Thank you modern medicine.

Just imagine how much worse covid would be had it hit 100 years ago.
Or during the time when doctors didn't wash their hands.

Or in the world before antibiotics.



posted on Nov, 11 2020 @ 01:49 PM
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a reply to: Never Despise

Think about it. If enough people don't die, mankind will perish from exhausting Earth's resources. We don't have the ability to "spread out" across the galaxy yet. It's God looking out for our longevity as a species.



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