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Pfizer says early analysis shows its Covid-19 vaccine is more than 90% effective

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posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 02:14 PM
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I hope this is legit and works!

Pfizer is the big shot in the pharmacy world, number one. I've been to all the major pharmacies as an IT guy but never Pfizer in New York City. It’s a major corporation in the world.

These pharmaceuticals are powerful, and they’re like a world in themselves—big giant complexes with many buildings and like a small city inside the plants.

It may be no coincidence the number one pharmacy in the world got the vaccine.

Although Vaccines aren't the only answer, let's hope it will help eliminate this disease

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edit on 9-11-2020 by Willtell because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 02:15 PM
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Fingers crossed. Although we have seen evidence of how easily CoVid mutates. If that happens the vaccine is pretty useless



posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 02:26 PM
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This is good news, the other ones that are in the mix are way less efficient than this ninety percent. I guess since all the evidence showing the coronavirus common cold gives you immunity and even some other kinds of colds gives some immunity, they can boost their effectiveness up. Now remember, the article is talking about covid 19, not necessarily the SARS-CoV-2 virus, it does have adjuvant therapy to dampen covid 19 from evolving from the virus, that could be why it's efficiency is considered 90%, I am not sure, but I think that this pfizer vaccine was based of Adenovirus, it stimulates the innate system to work properly instead of just targeting the SARS-CoV-2. I read about three different vaccines and what they are targeting, but I am not sure which was which. Depending if the targeted marker is off of a coronavirus like a cold, is what needs to be checked out. You can get the cold and are pretty much protected from covid, this they have found out recently.

It is still good news, hopefully the vaccine is not worse than the SARS-CoV2 virus for some people.
edit on 9-11-2020 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 02:28 PM
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a reply to: Willtell


two doses needed, 3 weeks apart, immunity after one month from first dose. Slow rollout.

- -80C storage and transport needed. Challenging, but doable in developed countries, but still may slow down mass rollout. Not feasible in many developing countries.

memory B and T cells up to 8 months after recovery from the illness. This means that an immunity of one year is probably likely.




posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 02:29 PM
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a reply to: Willtell



The Pfizer vaccine uses a never-before-approved technology called messenger RNA, or mRNA, to produce an immune response in people who are vaccinated.


And there's absolutely sweet # all that's likely to go wrong with that now is there.

JFC, wake up to yourself.



posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 02:33 PM
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BBC news were going on about this today,Its a completley new type of vaccine they said,new science-something to do with M RNA,which is super new they say..

Which makes me think this has a long way to go before its given the official "OK"
I mean I hope so,as if its completley new science then it will need to be intensely and thoroughly tested before anyone starts taking it.



posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 02:36 PM
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a reply to: Willtell



"How long this protection lasts is something we don't know," Bourla told CNN.


WooooooHooooo

And now for the business model medical justification.



It's not clear whether the Covid-19 vaccine will become a yearly or season shot, but Bourla believes it's likely. "I think it is a likely scenario that you will need periodical vaccinations," Bourla told Gupta. "The reason why we selected the RNA technology was exactly that. This is a technology that you can boost without problems of creating antibodies against your vaccine, again and again and again."



posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 02:39 PM
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originally posted by: dug88
a reply to: Willtell


two doses needed, 3 weeks apart, immunity after one month from first dose. Slow rollout.

- -80C storage and transport needed. Challenging, but doable in developed countries, but still may slow down mass rollout. Not feasible in many developing countries.

memory B and T cells up to 8 months after recovery from the illness. This means that an immunity of one year is probably likely.





I have a friend who was in the trial.

It was a blind study but he was POSITIVE he got the real deal.

After the first shot he said his arm felt like it was hit by a board for a few days. No other side effects. (a placebo wouldn't do that)

3 weeks later he went for the second shot, after the second shot he woke up in the middle of the night with a raging fever, felt like it was "the worst flu he ever had", that lasted about 5 hours. (a placebo absolutely would not do that). Then he was fine.

I asked if he thought it was worth it. He said during those 5 hours if you had asked him he would have said no. But by the next afternoon, 24 hours after getting the 2nd shot (when we talked to him) he said absolutely yes.

It has been a couple of months now and he has had no other side effects.

Interesting Democrats don't want it released until more people have died, oops, until Biden is sworn in as President.


edit on 11/9/20 by The2Billies because: addition



posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 02:44 PM
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I doubt thar more than 50% of people will take it and if they try to force it on people that is even more reason to resist. If someone wants to put this poison in their body that is their choice. If someone doesn’t want the shot that is also their choice.



posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 02:57 PM
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Four reasons for encouragement based on Pfizer’s Covid-19 vaccine results

Some good news. But again vaccines won't be the only antidote.



The world has been waiting for good news on Covid-19 vaccines. Monday it got a bunch of it.

A preliminary analysis of the race frontrunner, Pfizer-BioNTech’s mRNA vaccine, suggested it was 90% effective in preventing symptomatic Covid disease. While these are early findings — the trial is still ongoing — they suggest the vaccine could be very protective.

There’s another important caveat. We don’t yet have details about whether the vaccine blocked mainly mild cases, or if there is evidence that it seemed to prevent some severe infections, too.

We are likely to have multiple successful Covid-19 vaccines.

The Pfizer vaccine targets the spike protein, the knobby protrusion on the SARS-CoV-2 virus that allows the virus to attach to and invade human cells, initiating infection.

In fact, all of the vaccines being developed by major manufacturers working with Operation Warp Speed, the U.S. government effort to fast-track vaccines, target the spike protein...www.statnews.com...



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posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 03:04 PM
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a reply to: Willtell

As I posted in the Nano thread.

This vaccine is far from being ready.

They even admit that it is too early and it is not likely they will get the go ahead for the emergency distribution of this vaccine.

A vaccine is a hit or miss situation as it is, to rush a vaccine for a "novel" virus that they admit they know little about, is reckless and may even be criminal.

They are protected from repercussions, so they are willing to risk your life. Why anyone would want to risk their lives for a virus with a 98% recovery rate, and well over half the population doesn't even know if they have even had it, is a puzzle to me.

People have the right to take that risk if they choose, I just don't understand it.




edit on 9-11-2020 by NightSkyeB4Dawn because: Word drop.



posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 03:08 PM
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a reply to: The2Billies


I asked if he thought it was worth it. He said during those 5 hours if you had asked him he would have said no. But by the next afternoon, 24 hours after getting the 2nd shot (when we talked to him) he said absolutely yes.


Did you ask your friend why they thought it was worth it? Is your friend part of an at risk age group? Does your friend have an underlying medical condition?

What makes it worth it?



posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 03:12 PM
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Remember, the governors of New York and California say they are going to continue letting people die, while their states do independent studies on the vaccines effectiveness.



posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 03:13 PM
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a reply to: The2Billies


Interesting Democrats don't want it released until more people have died, oops, until Biden is sworn in as President.


"The Democrats" can't release the Pfizer vaccine because it isn't ready yet, it still has more trials to pass.
Also, Pfizer has publicly denounced politics when it comes to their vaccine.



posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 03:17 PM
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Imagine the wrongful-death and sickness lawsuits coming for this New York azzhole and the one who is in charge of California!

mobile.twitter.com...




posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 03:19 PM
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a reply to: Willtell Yes, a great deal of news on the COVID-19 vaccine front. On the US cable TV Bloomberg channel, the morning show Bloomberg Markets said the new Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is having a powerful effect on global markets, mostly to the good, but viewers should also keep in mind that the supply chain for almost all of the new COVID-19 vaccines will be like no other:

That new type of vaccine technology requires storage at super-cold temperatures (100 degrees centigrade). The Bloomberg Markets show anchor then said that "those machines (i.e., the freezers) often break."

Further, and separately from the Bloomberg channel on cable TV, the outbreak of COVID-19 throughout mink farms in Denmark represents a new strain of COVID-19. It remains to be seen whether this new strain of COVID-19 is susceptible to the new COVID-19 vaccines or is totally resistant.

Finally, new reports are emerging on Twitter and elsewhere about more convincing evidence that aerosol spread of COVID-19 is the chief mechanism by which COVID-19 is transmitted. Time will tell. But if so, I'm glad that months ago I began wearing an outlandish-looking getup when my family and I had to venture out to appointments and to make food purchases: A surgical mask topped by a capilene (polyester) neck gaiter, topped with rock-climbing sunglasses that fit flush to the face. When we took my MD son to the airport 2 weeks ago, he teased me that I resemble a Star Wars stormtrooper. I replied, "It reminds me more of the Sand People from the first Star Wars movie in the 1970s." (Laughter.)



posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 03:19 PM
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Are the antibodies going to disappear after 3-4 months..if so..why bother?



posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 03:21 PM
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There should be more than enough vaccine doses to go around very early, since 67% America does not want to be vaccinated against a mild disease like covid-19.



posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 03:21 PM
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originally posted by: Uphill
a reply to: Willtell Yes, a great deal of news on the COVID-19 vaccine front. On the US cable TV Bloomberg channel, the morning show Bloomberg Markets said the new Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is having a powerful effect on global markets, mostly to the good, but viewers should also keep in mind that the supply chain for almost all of the new COVID-19 vaccines will be like no other:

That new type of vaccine technology requires storage at super-cold temperatures (100 degrees centigrade). The Bloomberg Markets show anchor then said that "those machines (i.e., the freezers) often break."

Further, and separately from the Bloomberg channel on cable TV, the outbreak of COVID-19 throughout mink farms in Denmark represents a new strain of COVID-19. It remains to be seen whether this new strain of COVID-19 is susceptible to the new COVID-19 vaccines or is totally resistant.

Finally, new reports are emerging on Twitter and elsewhere about more convincing evidence that aerosol spread of COVID-19 is the chief mechanism by which COVID-19 is transmitted. Time will tell. But if so, I'm glad that months ago I began wearing an outlandish-looking getup when my family and I had to venture out to appointments and to make food purchases: A surgical mask topped by a capilene (polyester) neck gaiter, topped with rock-climbing sunglasses that fit flush to the face. When we took my MD son to the airport 2 weeks ago, he teased me that I resemble a Star Wars stormtrooper. I replied, "It reminds me more of the Sand People from the first Star Wars movie in the 1970s." (Laughter.)


My bud bought a cold war surplus gas mask, he has to bus it to work..wears it sometimes



posted on Nov, 9 2020 @ 03:24 PM
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a reply to: vonclod You ask a great question. Right now, the US FDA is studying the Pfizer preliminary vaccine test results. Even for emergency use authorization, the FDA must certify the safety of any COVID-19 vaccine. I'd say it's a 50/50 likelihood that any such vaccine will have to be given each year, like the flu shot. Time will tell. That type of information is not available from a preliminary vaccine trial.



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