It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

SCI/TECH: First Hydrogen DaimlerChrysler Car For Sale In 2012

page: 1
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 06:01 AM
link   
DaimlerChrysler's will begin selling its new Mercedes-Benz A-Class soon. The A-Class will be the first commercial vehicle by DaimlerChrysler that will be powered by hydrogen. Since hydrogen will be its primary fuel the only emissions it will have is water vapor. DaimlerChrysler is still working out problems with the car but insists that it will be available for the public to buy in 2012.

The article went on to say that the car industry has been waiting for energy companies to roll out the hydrogen filling stations. Shell Hydrogen stated that it is ready to fulfill the demand for hydrogen when the consumers need it.

 



story.news.yahoo.com
BRUSSELS (Reuters) - DaimlerChrysler's first hydrogen-powered car using fuel cell technology will be on sale from 2012, a company executive said on Wednesday.

The Mercedes car uses fuel cell technology where electricity is generated through the chemical reaction between hydrogen and air, emitting only water vapor.

"It (commercialization) will start in 2012," Herbert Kohler, Vice President of the Body and Powertrain research unit at DaimlerChrysler told reporters in Brussels, on the margins of a hydrogen car technology exhibition.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


A car that emits water vapor as its emissions, how great is that? I hope this catches on quick so everyone can begin to drive environmentally safe vehicles. I am anxious to see how much a gallon or therm of hydrogen will cost the average consumer. Hopefully it will be less than what the price of gasoline is right now. It is exciting to see that our world may be on the edge of changing from one fuel source to another. It will definitely be interesting to see how the huge oil rich countries will be effected.

Related News Links:
www.germancarfans.com
www.h2cars.biz
Hydrogen Generator and Lead Acid Battery Range Breakthrough

ATS Related:
Hydrogen: Making the leap into Showrooms soon!
Fuel-Cell Vehicles Close the Gap





[edit on 17-3-2005 by Event Horizon]




posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 06:12 AM
link   
Good find, but it will not be the first. That is coming this year so you might want to change you title.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

www.wired.com...



posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 06:21 AM
link   
Thank you for the correction and also for those links.



posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 06:23 AM
link   
If this could be coupled with clean energy sources such as nuclear power to create the hydrogen by elecrolysis of water, it could create a totally clean new fuel economy, but until then, it's only moving the source of the pollution from cars to power plants.



posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 06:27 AM
link   
Yeah I agree but still the work does needs to be done. In a pure Hydrogen economy we would be getting the power for electrolysis from an H2 Fusion Reactor. I.T.E.R. + Fuel Cells = Clean Economy. Nuclear can fill some gaps as can renewables until we reach a fully fledged H2 Economy.



posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 06:28 AM
link   
Here's another link to help with the news story.
*note it doesn't have to do with the car but it does deal with the hydrogen tech
pesn.com...



posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 08:15 AM
link   
The most hopeful news is that Shell is taking it seriously enough to produce and supply the hydrogen. I'd say it's pretty certain that gasolene's on the way out.



posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 08:48 AM
link   
When the world could have been running on Ethanol for years now. How many millions of metric tons of corn and other food products does the US throw away a year that could all be distilled and turned into automobile fuel?



posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 09:10 AM
link   

Originally posted by GrndLkNatv
How many millions of metric tons of corn and other food products does the US throw away a year that could all be distilled and turned into automobile fuel?


What, and have a fuel source that isn't controlled by oil companies?? hahahahahaaaa...



posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 09:26 AM
link   
as long as a comparable 4x4 vehicle is built with this technology and creates enough horsepower and torque for the uses of a 4 wheel drive vehicle, i will be more than happy to look at it. price will also play a major factor. the one thing i continue to worry about is how little the driver drives these days and how much the car drives for the driver. we have forgotten how to drive because of this and end up blaming accidents on the vehicles that are only trying to compensate for bad driving. with new technology, i can only assume this "autopilot" scenario gets deeper.



posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 09:40 AM
link   
Well there is always the Mazda RX8. It's rotary engine can burn almost any type of fuel even Hydrogen. Not a fuel cell but if you want lots of options then that may be the car for you. I know its not a 4x4, but Mazda plans on incorporating Rotary engines in some other models soon.



posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 10:55 AM
link   
I read that it takes more energy to produce an equivilant gallon of hydrogen fuel. Were running out of uranium worldwide, were running out of groundwater that produces corn for methanol, where will we get the fuel to make hydrogen.



posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 11:10 AM
link   

Originally posted by kazi
I read that it takes more energy to produce an equivilant gallon of hydrogen fuel.

True, but its getting better as we speak. There are also other ways that are being researched that passively generates H2 through sunlight, it's a type of Genetically modified algea grown in greenhouses. Neat stuff IMO.



Were running out of uranium worldwide, were running out of groundwater that produces corn for methanol, where will we get the fuel to make hydrogen.


Yes we are running out of uranium but there are other types of fission we can use, as well as Fusion. The groundwater problem is bad, I know but there are technical fixes that are being developed right now, we may have to rely on desalination for our water for a while though and importation of that water. We are facing quite a few challenges but I am confident that we can overcome them in time.

Another thing that will be huge when they figure it out is Solid State conversion of Heat to Electricity, GE tried it in the 60s and failed but a new company called PowerChip is trying to commercialize it....finally!

Also google up the Enviromission Solar Tower. Lots of stuff out there, all is not lost yet.



posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 11:12 AM
link   


Were running out of uranium worldwide, were running out of groundwater that produces corn for methanol, where will we get the fuel to make hydrogen.


I say forget hydrogen. What about batteries that recharge in 6 minutes, and last 10 times as long as normal ones? I posted details of it here:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Personally I think THAT is one answer to our energy crisis.

-p



posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 11:25 AM
link   
Nice and all, but electricity needs to be generated to charge those bateries, they don't charge on thin air



posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 11:38 AM
link   

Originally posted by Silenus
Nice and all, but electricity needs to be generated to charge those bateries, they don't charge on thin air


Absolutely, however you need power to create hydrogen as well. The question is which one would require more in the long-run. My thing is that if the batteries take a fraction of the time to recharge, and they last 10 times as long, you won't have near the energy requirements that older-generation batteries demanded, thusly reducing the demands on the infrastructure.

-P



posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 02:07 PM
link   
If getting a good charge for the batteries is such a big deal why dont car companies put coils on all four wheels? Then as the tires spin they could be charging. I know the hybrid toyota uses some kind of energy capturing brake system but why not use it on the wheels also.

[edit on 17-3-2005 by Event Horizon]



posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 02:09 PM
link   
sardion--enviro mission solar tower, good, interesting read.



posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 02:53 PM
link   
Good question, but there is an answer, and they are actually doing this already. Actually having that coil active while the car is being driven will add load to the drivetrain. Without getting into the details, you can't attach a generator to a motor, and expect the generator to return all of the power you used to get the motor to spin. Same principle. One application it is already being used for though, is regenerative braking (I think you mentioned that). My personal belief is that we have more than enough technlology to run a car without gas. If you use the aforementioned batteries, in conjunction with high-efficiency solar-cells (30% efficiency has been achieved BTW) that coat the car, regenerative braking, and I think there is a company in Austrailia who has a silicate, or ceramic, solid-state material that converts water rapidly into hydrogen using the sun, all working together, IMHO equals the technology necessary to have a car that is completely independent of the whole system, or at the VERY least drastically reduced dependence. If I had the money, I would build one, but my point is that the pieces are all out there. Someone just needs to get them all put together.

-P


Originally posted by Event Horizon
If getting a good charge for the batteries is such a big deal why dont car companies put coils all four wheels? Then as the tires spin they could be charging. I know the hybrid toyota uses some kind of energy capturing brake system but why not use it on the wheels also.


[edit on 17-3-2005 by postings]



posted on Mar, 17 2005 @ 03:04 PM
link   
sardion says:

"Yeah I agree but still the work does needs to be done. In a pure Hydrogen economy we would be getting the power for electrolysis from an H2 Fusion Reactor. I.T.E.R. + Fuel Cells = Clean Economy. Nuclear can fill some gaps as can renewables until we reach a fully fledged H2 Economy."

The problem is that the nearest H2 fusion reactor is about 93 million miles away.



new topics

top topics



 
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join