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Help with best snow tires Jeep Cherokee 2020

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posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 03:33 PM
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Hello all, not a gear head here, I prefer soups/ramen, but I digress.....

I have moved to a cold climate area and looking to outfit my girlfriends Jeep with some great snow tires. I have room to store my other tires in my barn and Im not worried about switching the tires from season to season. It is a

2020 Jeep Cherokee limited 4x4

All actual helpful comments and recommendations will be appreciated and welcomed. All other comments will be tolerated. 😜

Edmunds

Here’s an internet stock photo for your pleasure





posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 04:02 PM
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You might want to check out Goodyear Wrangler MT/R mud tires. Discount Tire has them and has all the specs.



posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 04:17 PM
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Living in the frozen north most of my life, you're good with a good set of regular all-seasons with that Jeep.

But if you want to go all out, check out Bridgestone Blizzak tires.



posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 04:22 PM
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Sweet, thank you both

The blizzack I see for this vehicle are

Blizzak DM-V2 Bridgestone's Light Truck/SUV Studless Ice & Snow
edit on 17-10-2020 by TheAlleghenyGentleman because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 04:33 PM
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originally posted by: TheAlleghenyGentleman
Sweet, thank you both

The blizzack I see for this vehicle are

Blizzak DM-V2 Bridgestone's Light Truck/SUV Studless Ice & Snow


Those are the ones! I had an old Thunderbird rear wheel drive when I was younger - it was impossible on ice/snow, I got the blizzaks and they made a world of difference. They are not cheap though if I remember correctly.



posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 04:45 PM
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Bfg ko2...hands down.

K02, then Mtr, then duratrac. Discount tires usually stocks the k02 and Duratrac in your load range.

I've run all of them on road, offroad and snow.
Hated the mtr and duratrac. Loved the older mtr without the strip in the tread.
They both have very soft sidewalls as far as flex goes and scalloped the outer lugs on the road when cornering.

The ko2 is superior in every way except high speed wet cornering.
Which is weird because it's insane in snow.
40k mile life with abusive driving.

Discount tire has road force balancing, the best setup there is.



posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 04:47 PM
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a reply to: Gnawledge

Like 700 for the set. I will spend the cash for her not to crash


Thunderbird huh?

My first car was a 1978 chevy camero. You could take the keys out of the ignition while driving. Classy 🤙



posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 04:48 PM
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a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman
All season tires will usually do fine, but if she needs to drive in the snow no matter how bad it is, I would look at snow tires.

My preference is to spend the extra and get studded snow tires. That way you are better off when it's icy.

Brand shouldn't make a difference if you go with snow tires. I've tried many, and no accidents yet.

I would be careful about getting mud or all terrain tires for driving in snow. The rubber on snow tires is softer so that it grips better when it's cold. Just make sure you swap them out before it gets to hot out, I destroyed a set of snow tires because I was to broke to replace them.



posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 04:48 PM
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originally posted by: Mandroid7
Bfg ko2...hands down.

K02, then Mtr, then duratrac. Discount tires usually stocks the k02 and Duratrac in your load range.

I've run all of them on road, offroad and snow.
Hated the mtr and duratrac. Loved the older mtr without the strip in the tread.
They both have very soft sidewalls as far as flex goes and scalloped the outer lugs on the road when cornering.

The ko2 is superior in every way except high speed wet cornering.
Which is weird because it's insane in snow.
40k mile life with abusive driving.

Discount tire has road force balancing, the best setup there is.



Great thanx. Checking them out now



posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 04:51 PM
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I also have to recomend the Goodyear Wrangler, I have used them on most of my trucks with good results, we get a good bit of snow here in Minnesota, although i prefer Michelin on my sedan



posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 04:54 PM
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a reply to: Scrable

Studded snow tires huh...

Ok, I have no idea. Haha. I will look those up.

a reply to: TimHeller

Goodyear wrangler. You recommend the entire line of tire?



posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 04:59 PM
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Check your state regs for studded. Lots of places they are restricted to winter months only. That means two sets of tires and swapping them out twice a year, which is a PITA.



posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 05:26 PM
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originally posted by: TheAlleghenyGentleman
a reply to: Scrable

Studded snow tires huh...

Like Schuyler said, you will have to swap them out when it's warm.

But I drove a rear wheel drive mustang through every snow storm for eight years. You really notice the difference with studs in your tires.



posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 05:30 PM
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Ask at the tire shop where you are living what they are recommending, remember, ask for a decent priced tire, not the best they have. Usually the high life ones are too hard and do not hold the road. A more agressive all season tire is good around here. People have preferences, but usually you can get a good set of tires for about five hundred seventy five bucks out the door if you shop right. Too agressive a tire tends to make a lot of road noise, we have those kind on our explorer and have put them on other AWD cars in the past, but we don't go far so we now have one vehicle with a less agressive thread and two with more agressive tires which we use year round.

Find a good honest local dealer, and remember, expensive is not always better. A good tire shop will try to stock lots of a good tire for their regular customers and doing so they get better buying costs so they can sell it cheaper.

Asking around is a good idea, people in your area are glad to share their recommendations, but some people do not realize that they could have got a good winter tire cheaper, and they believe they made the best choice when maybe they didn't. Never go into a tire shop and ask for the best tire they have...ask for the best reasonably priced tire they have, one they would use on their own vehicle.



posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 05:33 PM
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a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman

I would suggest a good all terrain tire.
Mud tires are the best in snow but are a pain on dry roads and noisy.



posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 05:39 PM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

You suggestion is to go with all terrain not snow or all season. Why is that?

Tons of options......



posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 05:45 PM
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a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman

Because switching tires is a pain..
I run all terrain year round and it works well for me.
Honestly you should ask the locals about their tire of choice.



posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 05:52 PM
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Negative on the studded tires. Unless you are racing on ice, or building an arctic offroader with 50" floatation tires to cross glaciers. You don't want to drive studs on concrete and the roads are rarely all snow everywhere.
I would argue that the jgc is the best snow vehicle made, besides the annoying abs system.
The quadratrac transfer case is phenomenal.
The main things to look at on a good snow tire is compound (hardness...its ability to stay soft in the cold), siping(small slices in tread) and its overall dimensions.
More contact area (wider tires) reduces contact pressure and traction.
Big, wide offroad tires are terrible on traction situations where you don't want to float over deep stuff.
So, "skinnier" than stock tires give better snow and ice performance.
Either way, when shopping look at the snowflake (lol)rating.
I believe it ranges fron 1-4 snowflakes.
You'll have to confirm this, but I think the ko2s are the top rated in the group.
Ko2s aren't cheap and are aggressive and look sweet, but a tamer blizzak or similar tire is going to work great in most onroad conditions.
They have the siping and soft compound.
Downside being cold weather only, or fast wear down rates.
This is where the k02 shines. Vicious in mud, rocks, snow, fast on road, quiet, good mpgs, long wear AND it's good year round.
It's almost magical. Can't praise it enough.
Good luck
Let us know what you go with.



posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 05:54 PM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

I will. I just wanted to have more info on the subject before opening my mouth and being absolutely clueless.

Im pretty handy mostly but just have never bought a second set of seasonal tires. Im pretty good at lifting random heavy things, opening jars and reaching things in high places that are also heavy.



posted on Oct, 17 2020 @ 05:57 PM
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a reply to: Mandroid7

Ahhh yes, the ol’ snowflake rating. I already use that one to harshly judge millennials. I think Im steering towards the blizzak at this moment. But, Im pretty fickle with stuff like this until Im sure.




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