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Timelapse From Hubble Shows a Star Literally Exploding

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posted on Oct, 5 2020 @ 04:00 PM
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A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away , this happened.


The Galaxy is called NGC 2525 and the supernova somewhere in that Galaxy happened 70 million years ago , but because of light speed being so slow we and not the Dinosaurs get to see it today... sweet.

In January 2018, a bright explosion of light was spotted at the outskirts of a galaxy called NGC 2525, 70 million light-years away. In February of 2018, the Hubble Space Telescope turned its Wide Field Camera 3 in the flash's direction, and started taking pictures.

For an entire year, until February 2019, Hubble continued to take images of the progression of the supernova as it faded over time, until it was no longer visible.

The space telescope just missed the supernova's peak brightness of about 5 billion times the light of the Sun, but it was still gleaming extremely brightly when Hubble tuned in.
www.sciencealert.com...


Boom !

Commiserations to any space brothers and sisters in the vicinity at the time.




posted on Oct, 5 2020 @ 04:55 PM
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The distances involved are simply unfathomable.

I wonder how much of a bang it made when it went supernova 70 million years ago?

MR



posted on Oct, 5 2020 @ 05:02 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Get me all excited to see a star explode and then it just looked like someone flipped a switch and turned it off.

Amazing.



posted on Oct, 5 2020 @ 05:14 PM
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originally posted by: Marlborough Red
The distances involved are simply unfathomable.

I wonder how much of a bang it made when it went supernova 70 million years ago?

MR

It's mind boggling to be sure. Been watching a lot of this stuff on the youtube, the scale of things are just unimaginable.

Cool thread



posted on Oct, 5 2020 @ 05:16 PM
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Hopefully nobody got hurt in that star system...



posted on Oct, 5 2020 @ 05:43 PM
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originally posted by: 0bserver1
Hopefully nobody got hurt in that star system...



“I felt a great disturbance in the Force. As if millions of voices suddenly cried out in terror and were suddenly silenced.” —

Obi-Wan Kenobi



posted on Oct, 5 2020 @ 05:43 PM
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There goes the neighborhood.



posted on Oct, 5 2020 @ 05:52 PM
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a reply to: gortex



but because of light speed being so slow we and not the Dinosaurs get to see it today


Light speed is slow? Well I guess thats relative now isn't it?



posted on Oct, 5 2020 @ 05:58 PM
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originally posted by: 0bserver1
Hopefully nobody got hurt in that star system...


Depending on the size of the star, it's super nova could potentially sterilize any planet within up to 1,000 light-years.



posted on Oct, 5 2020 @ 06:01 PM
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a reply to: Edumakated
Should we send in the red cross or is it a bit to late for that..?



posted on Oct, 5 2020 @ 06:50 PM
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originally posted by: Marlborough Red
The distances involved are simply unfathomable.

I wonder how much of a bang it made when it went supernova 70 million years ago?

MR


We won't know for another 5.8 billion years when the sound waves go by and rip our planet apart.




posted on Oct, 5 2020 @ 07:35 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Awesome! Thanks for posting Gortex.


To read this:

The space telescope just missed the supernova's peak brightness of about 5 billion times the light of the Sun, but it was still gleaming extremely brightly when Hubble tuned in.

I can't even get my tiny brain around that number.
edit on 5-10-2020 by TortoiseKweek because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2020 @ 07:38 PM
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originally posted by: 0bserver1
a reply to: Edumakated
Should we send in the red cross or is it a bit to late for that..?



I'll lend you my time machine, under strict conditions, no eating or drinking in it. Then you are welcome to get the Red Cross over there, lol!



posted on Oct, 5 2020 @ 08:06 PM
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found some light curves and images from amateurs: www.rochesterastronomy.org...
maybe I'll point my scope at it and check it out.

cool find. : )



posted on Oct, 5 2020 @ 08:08 PM
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What is concerning, but nothing to be done about, is some other events on the horizon
..so to speak.



posted on Oct, 5 2020 @ 08:16 PM
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Be cool to light my cigarette off that 🚭



posted on Oct, 5 2020 @ 10:36 PM
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originally posted by: HalWesten

originally posted by: Marlborough Red
The distances involved are simply unfathomable.

I wonder how much of a bang it made when it went supernova 70 million years ago?

MR


We won't know for another 5.8 billion years when the sound waves go by and rip our planet apart.



Actually, it would take about 63 TRILLION years for sound waves to travel here from there. This is if you use how fast sound waves travel at sea level on earth.


By that time the stars of the universe would have largely been long burnt out and the universe will be effectively dead.



posted on Oct, 5 2020 @ 10:48 PM
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a reply to: HalWesten



We won't know for another 5.8 billion years when the sound waves go by and rip our planet apart.

And no one will hear us scream in space.



posted on Oct, 5 2020 @ 10:55 PM
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So Hubble did nothing else for a year but watch what was left of that star cool-down? Or does Hubble have more than one telescope, so it can multi-task?



posted on Oct, 6 2020 @ 12:21 AM
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Star trek is such a laugh - The warp scale is not linear. According to the official Star Trek writer's guide, the scale proceeds according to the equation v = w^3c, where c is light speed, and w is warp factor. So Warp 1 is (1)^3*c, or light speed. Warp 2 becomes (2)^3*c, or 8 times light speed, Warp 3 is (3)^3*c, or 27 times light speed, and so on. By this equation, Warp 8 is (8)^3*c, or 512 times the speed of light. It would thus take 1.93 years to travel 990.7 light years, which I would say qualifies as "a while".
So warp 8 is 512 times the speed of light does that sound fast ?
well that will get you 512 light years In any direction in our galaxy that is 120,000 LIGHT years across .

with in 100 light years 512 stars ODD BUT there you have it in 2 months you could get to any ONE JUST one of these stars .

so about 3 stars a year . I do believe we need a fast ship slip stream any one ?
Forget star trek think space balls and LUDCRIS speeds and going into Plad .
edit on 6-10-2020 by midnightstar because: (no reason given)







 
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