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It's Like a Storm of Bees at a Wisconsin Gas Station

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posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 07:13 PM
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Saw this video on Facebook. Not sure if this is ordinary or unusual. I've never seen anything like this before without it being a beekeeper. This seems to be a lot of bees. This happened in Menominee, WI at a gas station right in town. Any ideas why they would swarm like this?

Facebook video post




posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 07:20 PM
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a reply to: Rezlooper

When you talk of a large group of bees, it is fairly normal to call it a swarm.

Wonder why?




posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 07:23 PM
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Bees in a swarm looking for a new home, I actually witnessed this only once behind my house, really cool to see in person.



posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 07:23 PM
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a reply to: Rezlooper


I was stuck in a cloud of killer bees at a red light once in Gilbert AZ; I was on the phone with my sister and she kept telling me don’t worry they can’t get in. Longest red light ever; I cracked and blew the red light and got out of there.


edit on 21-9-2020 by KTemplar because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 07:26 PM
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originally posted by: panoz77
Bees in a swarm looking for a new home, I actually witnessed this only once behind my house, really cool to see in person.


Yeah, it usually has to do with hive populations vs hive efficiency. The queen stops givin off her pheremones and does the bolt looking for a new place to establish a hive.

Some bees stay and a new queen emerges, but some follow the old queen to new digs. Reduces the total population in both locations to something more sustainable. Wonder of nature sort of stuff.

By the way, the bees aren't likely to attack when swarming like this. They are more interested in not getting left out in the move.

edit on 21/9/2020 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 07:27 PM
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a reply to: Rezlooper

Nothing particularly unusual about it. I have personally experienced exactly the same thing a couple of times and also seen swarms hanging in trees.

I'm not sure exactly why it happens but I would imagine that, from time to time, a tree that the bees have a hive in will fall over and they have to find another tree.


edit on 21 9 2020 by myselfaswell because: I just bloody love a good old fashioned edit.



posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 07:27 PM
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originally posted by: panoz77
Bees in a swarm looking for a new home, I actually witnessed this only once behind my house, really cool to see in person.


I’ve heard about this. The swarm follows their queen. Where the queen goes, so goes the swarm. I guess it’s kind of common for a swarm to move at this time of the year. Either that, or maybe their hive was destroyed and they have to find a new home.



posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 07:34 PM
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I encountered bees at a Texas interstate rest area once. They started swarming out of garbage, were bigger than normal bees and were quite aggressive. I jumped back in my car with the windows rolled up. The bees were ramming the windows and windshield. I decided to leave immediately.

Regular bees seem to be harmless unless their nest is disturbed.
edit on 21-9-2020 by eManym because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 07:58 PM
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a reply to: eManym





posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 07:59 PM
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Is that where Jimmy Negamanee was from?



posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 08:01 PM
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a reply to: Rezlooper

Thought this was about bLM at first....

I've seen bugs swarm a gas station so bad, on ground and in air, that you can hear them crunch under your tire as you drive through it. No rhyme or reason. They weren't bees but it was weird nonetheless.



posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 08:02 PM
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I had them in a tree in our yard once. Roughly 30 to 40 stings, a fall giving me a black eye and I finally got in the house. We called a beekeeper and he explained that they were migrating. Based on the intensity and persistence of the attack he thought they were probably africanized. He smoked them into the tree with poison and sealed the opening. Hubby took me to the emergency room due to the number of stings. I am in Texas and there are a lot of the africanized bees here. Very aggressive. You may not have noticed but they will chase your car for a ways. They have killed people, livestock and pets.



posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 08:05 PM
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originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: panoz77
Bees in a swarm looking for a new home, I actually witnessed this only once behind my house, really cool to see in person.


Yeah, it usually has to do with hive populations vs hive efficiency. The queen stops givin off her pheremones and does the bolt looking for a new place to establish a hive.

Some bees stay and a new queen emerges, but some follow the old queen to new digs. Reduces the total population in both locations to something more sustainable. Wonder of nature sort of stuff.

By the way, the bees aren't likely to attack when swarming like this. They are more interested in not getting left out in the move.


Thanks for this explanation. Definitely a wonder of nature.



posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 08:06 PM
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a reply to: KTemplar

That’s crazy! I used to live in Gilbert.

3.5 years ago, I was driving up the 17 to Sedona. Right around Happy Valley, we saw a swarm of bees coming at us — MUCH larger and more organized than the one in the video. Like in a wave.

Unfortunately, that swarm made it on my Toyota Tundras grill, at the very wrong moment, at 75 miles an hour.

Easily over a hundred dead honey bees on my car. I felt terrible.....



posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 08:06 PM
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originally posted by: LSU2018
a reply to: Rezlooper

Thought this was about bLM at first....

I've seen bugs swarm a gas station so bad, on ground and in air, that you can hear them crunch under your tire as you drive through it. No rhyme or reason. They weren't bees but it was weird nonetheless.


Yep, bugs for sure. I live up here in northern Wisconsin and we have our share of bugs in the summer time. Very bad at times. But bees, nope.



posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 08:09 PM
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originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: Rezlooper

When you talk of a large group of bees, it is fairly normal to call it a swarm.

Wonder why?




Yes, a swarm. I've witnesses swarms, but this video is on a much larger scale, thus use of the word "storm"



posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 08:43 PM
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a reply to: KKLOCO

I knew we had something in common. Where abouts in Gilbert? I lived at Power Ranch 07-09.



posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 08:44 PM
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a reply to: Rezlooper

Are we sure they were bees? They could have been wasps, yellowjackets, hornets...



posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 08:52 PM
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a reply to: KTemplar

Higley and Guadalupe. In 2011.

A whirlwind ever since.



posted on Sep, 21 2020 @ 09:09 PM
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a reply to: KKLOCO

Know those roads very well, seems I dipped before you!




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