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Does limiting the N word silence black cultural figures?

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posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 11:48 AM
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originally posted by: dug88
a reply to: galaga

Or BReal from Cypress Hill, though I have to say, when I seen Cypress Hill last year , he'd changed up 'n-word' to something else in a bunch of his verses. or Rage Against the Machine


That is what I'm saying!!!!!!!

I love Cypress and I've seen them twice, Illusions is my favourite...
But they change their lyrics to be more acceptable.

It's control.




posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 11:53 AM
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a reply to: dug88
1 slight correction...



RATM covered it for a reason!



posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 12:01 PM
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originally posted by: AaarghZombies
a reply to: Krahzeef_Ukhar

I don't know about silencing them, but it certainly makes it harder to quote them.

Fair enough.
It doesn't silence us.

It just limits our speech.



posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 12:03 PM
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a reply to: Krahzeef_Ukhar

I don't know. Does limiting any cuss words silence someone's cultural voice? Is it always necessary to coarsen discourse in order to make one's point in so-called art?



posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 12:22 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: Krahzeef_Ukhar

I don't know. Does limiting any cuss words silence someone's cultural voice? Is it always necessary to coarsen discourse in order to make one's point in so-called art?



When specific words are limited, yes.
I can say peckerwood but I can't say the "N word".

It's infantilising.



posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 12:41 PM
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originally posted by: Krahzeef_Ukhar

originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: Krahzeef_Ukhar

I don't know. Does limiting any cuss words silence someone's cultural voice? Is it always necessary to coarsen discourse in order to make one's point in so-called art?



When specific words are limited, yes.
I can say peckerwood but I can't say the "N word".

It's infantilising.


Here's the thing though. I'm not talking about banning the word by force. I'm asking why such words are necessary.

Go around and you hear people talking with cuss words every other word like those are the only vocabulary they know.

Go in the hood and black folks tend to pepper in the "n" word with the cuss words the same way.

Remember, how the word "like" got used to so often in certain modes of speech that everyone used to hate it? Well, why do we cuss and use racial slurs the same way and think nothing of it? It cheapens and coarsens our discourse.

So many wonderful words in the world, so many layers of meaning and all we can do is MF this and "n" word that. Why? Why do we need to?



posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 12:43 PM
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originally posted by: galaga
I've never felt comfortable with the word in public. But in private, that's a whole other story.


That's hilarious!
Well played.



posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 12:44 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
So many wonderful words in the world, so many layers of meaning and all we can do is MF this and "n" word that. Why? Why do we need to?


MF is a wonderful word.
"n" is a wonderful word.

Words are awesome, we need more!!!



posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 12:51 PM
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a reply to: Krahzeef_Ukhar

Like I said, I'm not saying ban them. I am saying they are way, way overused. They lose their impact if they're all you know how to say.



posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 01:00 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

You are saying that you don't like the words people use.
That's fair.

But you're gonna have to use words they don't like to convince them.



posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 01:01 PM
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originally posted by: Krahzeef_Ukhar
As a Richard Pryor fanboy, I need to be able to say the "N word" to appreciate his greatness.
As a Patrice O'neal fanboy, I need to be able to say the "N word" to appreciate his greatness.

If I really wanna sing along with "F the Police" and appreciate it's greatness I need to say the "N word" to state the name of the band.

Is it possible that the limiting of the "N word" isn't about appeasing white guilt but silencing dissenting black views?


Being a black guy, I despise the word as a term of endearment. However, I can admit using it in my youth.

It is ironic you mention Richard Pryor. He did an entire bit on why he decided to stop using the word as a term of endearment.




posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 01:04 PM
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a reply to: Edumakated
Thank you!
I do understand that, however...

His greatest bit is "It's too cold to be hatin"
I can't finish that sentence.

IMHO his greatest bit is.. I don't know nothin
edit on 10-9-2020 by Krahzeef_Ukhar because: editing is fun



posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 01:05 PM
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originally posted by: Krahzeef_Ukhar
a reply to: ketsuko

You are saying that you don't like the words people use.
That's fair.

But you're gonna have to use words they don't like to convince them.


How often do you see me use those words here? Truthfully, in my day to day, I never do use them except privately with my husband in expressions of very strong anger or disgust. I never use MF. I will occasionally say "Eff 'em!"

I can admit that I will pepper my windshield in frustrating traffic situations when I'm the only one in the car.



posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 01:08 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko
Never.
But it wouldn't be a problem if you did.



posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 01:16 PM
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originally posted by: Edumakated
Being a black guy, I despise the word as a term of endearment. However, I can admit using it in my youth.


I ain't trying to tell you jokes.

You used Pryor against me and you did it brilliantly!
Imagine if you never heard Pryor because he said a bad word?



posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 02:42 PM
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a reply to: Krahzeef_Ukhar

I loved the old Pryor and Wilder team.
My first wife and I saw Silver Streak in the theater when it was a new release.
That was before VHS, way before DVD.

She loved that movie so much that she figured even if it would cost thousands for a projector and the reels it would be worth it just to own that one movie.



posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 02:50 PM
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a reply to: lakenheath24



Its nothing but cultural appropriation from peeps of Nigerian descent.

According to wikipedia the name Nigeria(1897) and Niger both were named for the river.

The N-word seems to have been around much longer.



posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 02:59 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko



Remember, how the word "like" got used to so often in certain modes of speech that everyone used to hate it?

So now I'm all like "Well at least I didn't like talk that way when it was like all popular and stuff."

It adds a bit to writing conversation.

Then she said "..."
Then she was like "..."
Then she was all like "..."

A bit of variety.



posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 03:01 PM
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a reply to: pthena

I admit to using like in my speech that way on occasion. It's habit I picked up during those days.



posted on Sep, 10 2020 @ 07:55 PM
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I don’t have an issue with the double standard here beyond not liking double standards.

The “N Word” when said by a white person to a black person has a legit historical significance. It’s just not in good taste to use the “N Word” in general. I mean, do most people walk around feeling comfortable calling Jewish people “k!kes”? Probably not - it’s another term that just doesn’t need to be used. So, keeping derogatory language out of my vocabulary doesn’t seem like a huge ask to me.

In terms of silencing - maybe. NWA, RATM, Snoop, Dre, Wutang - and many other true artists - use the N word prolifically. If anything, that use just imbeds the use of the word into black culture specifically. Which burns the term into kids at a young age - keeps it alive in a way.

A wonderment to me is how we’re having this conversation now yet go back in the history of comedy, sports, music, movies and more and since the 60s people of all races have forked out serious cash to watch people of all races do stuff that is impressive to see. Credit was given to those who had talents - regardless of race - and legends were made. Use of the “N word” was way more prolific over huge swaths of that 60 year period - yet race relations were better at many points in the past!



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