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Normalcy Bias in the New Normal

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posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 10:00 AM
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With everything going on in politics along with the havoc caused by the pandemic and social upheaval, the changes to our lives, often referred to as the "New Normal", are undeniable. In my eyes there can be no holding on to the "Old Normal" and if things become extreme enough it would be unwise to try.

Normalcy Bias has a tremendous grip on the minds of the general public. This idea that because things have been a certain way for generations, particularly for a person's given life time, you can expect there to be no major changes to the "way things are", is a huge barrier to being able to adapt to the current unstable situation.

Even this idea of hiding at a bug out compound or in an under ground bunker is a form of normalcy bias. As you hide, you endeavor to continue your lifestyle in the most normal way possible. The movie "Blast from the Past" with Christopher Walken and Brendan Fraser comes to mind. After 30 some years, they were really out of touch with the "New Normal". Another movie comes to mind, "A Boy and His Dog" starring Jason Robards and Don Johnson. It's an extreme example, but the under ground community tried to keep some semblance of the old normal. Many science fiction stories have similar story lines or sub plots.

I am seriously doubting if I, or anyone else, can have a new normalcy bias in response to the changing situation that is beginning to become more extreme and unstable every day. I wonder if I will ever have any kind of normalcy bias to cling to after the dump trucks begin to unload manure in front of the giant industrial sized fans set on high.
edit on 5-9-2020 by MichiganSwampBuck because: Typo




posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 10:03 AM
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a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck

I will always have or fight for my freedom of choice.

That is my normality bias and there's nothing i see happening that i need to adapt to.

"New normal" / "Old normal" no such thing.
edit on 5-9-2020 by CthruU because: 1



posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 10:10 AM
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originally posted by: CthruU
a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck

I will always have or fight for my freedom of choice.

That is my normality bias and there's nothing i see happening that i need to adapt to.

"New normal" / "Old normal" no such thing.


It seems it will be one hell of a fight to me, but a good fight. Keep exercising your freedom and hope you have the same choices to make as you always have.




posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 10:23 AM
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In the area I'm living, things have changed to a fairly extreme degree. Masks, distancing, etc. along with limited availability of many important products and services. "I can live with all that, it hasn't changed that much to interrupt my lifestyle", except it has.

I've been making some hard choices because of what's going on, and even though I'm in a very good position to be able to handle what comes next, it looks like it will be a rough ride no matter where you hide or try to make a stand for the "Old Normal".
edit on 5-9-2020 by MichiganSwampBuck because: Typo



posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 10:24 AM
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The more the news and media and radical government try and force things down my throat the more and more I resist. Let Freedom Ring.





edit on 5-9-2020 by Brotherman because: (no reason given)

edit on 5-9-2020 by Brotherman because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 10:28 AM
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originally posted by: Brotherman
The more the news and media and radical government try and force things down my throat the more and more I resist. Let Freedom Ring.


:cheer s:


So I take it that your normalcy bias is escalating your resistance to the government? That was never my normal, I went to the polls and wrote some letters in the way of the old normal.



posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 10:30 AM
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a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck

My mother always used to say I'm high strung, 6 years of Marine Corps Infantry didn't help much either.



posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 10:34 AM
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Normalcy bias is an individual perception and that is obvious of course. I'm sure that a homeless person's normal is different than a wealthy person's. However, things going on now are changing everyone's normal, but in differing ways to be sure.



posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 10:40 AM
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a reply to: Brotherman

This must be your time to shine Brotherman. It sounds like you got what it takes.



posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 10:47 AM
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Depending what side your on the proud boiz boogaloo wars should be a "hoot" as they say in Michigan. The new normal might be a bit bloody. There's also a negative side.
edit on 5-9-2020 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 10:49 AM
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a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck

I possess the power to make anything I want from anything I want, I am not willing to give that up for anyone or anything. Burn Loot Murder, Try that in my neck of the woods, If I have to turn off my machines or set my welding helmet down someone is going to get something rammed down their throat.



posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 10:51 AM
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originally posted by: Brotherman
a reply to: MichiganSwampBuck

My mother always used to say I'm high strung, 6 years of Marine Corps Infantry didn't help much either.


I have been told that one of the key characteristics that makes a Marine different from all others is his/her ability to adapt successfully to any situation thrown at them.

No matter what “it” is, a Marine will chew it up and spit it out!

But if “resistance” is your fallback strategy, it sounds like you might be limiting your adaptability?

Life is a series of challenges. That’s what makes it interesting, makes it worth living.

Every challenge is an opportunity to live more, to live better.


“Life is a banquet. Most poor fools are starving themselves!”



posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 11:10 AM
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a reply to: Bhadhidar

Locate close with and destroy the enemy by fire and maneuver or repel the enemies assualt by fire and close combat. That was my job description.

Resisting forces and adaptability do go hand in hand by description of these methods are plastic they are forever and always changing.



posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 11:21 AM
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I guess it comes down to how hard a person is willing to resist the "New Normal" to continue with their life unaffected by the changes.

Offense is a tough road, and one must consider the old saying, "The best offense is a good defense". This is not to imply any value judgement on how one may try to preserve their personal normalcy bias based on their skill set or life experiences.

I merely question in my own mind, "How far for how much?" to endure for the struggle to retain normalcy.
edit on 5-9-2020 by MichiganSwampBuck because: Typo



posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 11:25 AM
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I've felt this way about the USA for a while. I've been out of country so long, the USA I left no longer exists.

"Going home" would be moving to another different culture.


Yeah, I made my choices. Now I live with them.

Cheers



posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 11:33 AM
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a reply to: F2d5thCavv2

Have you retained the "Old Normal" normalcy bias in regards to the situation in the U.S.?

How long have you been out?

Did you leave to escape the encroaching "New Normal" way ahead of the curve?



posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 11:34 AM
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I maintain that the most effective method of avoiding "the" new normal is to redefine and embed "another" new normal.

There is certainly no going back, at this point, no matter how desperately people cling to the notion. I still see many, many people arguing for, and asking for, the same things they would have a year ago.

I like the new normal where we leverage modern technology platforms to make every household self-sufficient. Decentralization can have massive downsides, but things like communications technology change that dramatically.

Most seem to think that this sort of decentralized infrastructure is a non-sequitor. It doesnt directly talk about riots or The Virus, after all.

However, besides being direct competition for the dystopian centralized system, such concepts (if deployed) would go further in solving perennial issues that many claim to care about like: hunger, poverty, equality, etc.



posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 11:41 AM
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a reply to: Serdgiam

There will eventually be a more stable new normal, whatever that might eventually be. The question is, will it be as good or better than what we have now?

I can't help but think it will be more of a Mad Max or Book of Eli type new normal once the dust settles. I don't see much more than uncertainty and chaos for the near future.



posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 11:41 AM
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originally posted by: MichiganSwampBuck
a reply to: F2d5thCavv2

Have you retained the "Old Normal" normalcy bias in regards to the situation in the U.S.?

How long have you been out?

Did you leave to escape the encroaching "New Normal" way ahead of the curve?


Bro, I am stuck in the past. I know that is not good and your OP resonated.

I "left" a long time ago to work as an ex-pat. I've been gone since before 9-11. Old USA is part of history now.

Cheers



posted on Sep, 5 2020 @ 11:52 AM
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a reply to: F2d5thCavv2

So you left to pursue a career and your old school vision of the states is nostalgic compared to what you observe today.

I assume then you have a normalcy bias from your perspective as an expat, one that likely has changed due to the pandemic, but perhaps not. I'm sure some things have changed for you.



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