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A little doom – Poor Earth

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posted on Aug, 26 2020 @ 07:19 PM
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So I have been busy making a compilation list “lock-down mood distraction” from old lists I made many years ago in my “Earth Cycle” hobby. Please excuse spelling and copy/paste mistakes (tried to check but must have missed some)

First I would like to ad Supernovas and a little doom to my100,000 year cycle upgrade

We are in the 6th major extinction which is heading towards its peak and Antarctica is taking us there. Ice-ages (climate) are the most lethal contributor according to history



Extinctions:

650 Mil BC (Climate) – “Snowball Earth” extinction wiped out 70% of sea plants due to global glaciations. (It came close but did not cover the equator)
443 Mil BC (Climate) – The glaciations of Gondwana were responsible for the second largest mass extinction according to studies
374 Mil BC (Climate) – Global cooling with surface temperatures dropping around 8°C and extinct 70% of marine species. This was a prolonged series of extinctions occurring over 20 million years. Evidence of anoxia in oceanic bottom waters
360-280 Mil BC (Climate) – The Karoo Ice-age had extensive glaciations with extinctions on the Gondwana continent, the current Karoo region of South Africa, Australia, Antarctica, India and South America. The Laurasia continent the current Europe, Greenland, Siberia, North America, Kazakhstan and Northern China was believed to be ice free
359 BC (Space) – The Devonian-Carboniferous boundary contain hundreds of thousands of generations of plant spores that appear to be sunburnt by ultraviolet light — evidence of a long-lasting ozone-depletion due to a possible Supernova event
252.28 Mil BC (±11,000 years) (Climate) – The Triassic–Jurassic extinction was Earth's worst Mass extinction that eliminated 90% of ocean dwellers, and 70% of land plants and animals. It lasted less than 200,000 years and corresponds to a glaciations period. Sediment layers with an accuracy of 35,000 years in the Nanpanjiang basin in southern China prove this extinction timeline with a sea-water level decreased for around 80,000 years
Although the Siberian traps started 400,000 years before the main extinction it was a double, maybe triple extinction with the Siberian trap peeking around 500,000 years after the glaciations period of extinctions
The Siberia Traps has the largest known deposited of lava and volcanic rocks on land and lasted for around 900,000 years with the main trap forming in less than 60,000 years
It seems there must have been another event with massif atmospheric changes and greenhouse gas releases as Oxygen (O2) levels dropped from 30% to 12% as the Carbon dioxide (CO2) level was below 2000 ppm) An global upward jump in temperature reach 50-60°C on land, and 40°C at the sea surface (this misery is far from solved, studies seem to prove the ocean extinction 1,5 million years after the Triassic–Jurassic boundary extinction – still can’t shake the comet feeling)
232 Mil BC (Climate) – Durring the “Carnian Pluvial Episode” shock events with four pulses of warming and climate perturbation within a million years led to repeated extinctions. The climates shuttled from dry to humid and back, speculations put the eruptions, in western Canada represented today by the great Wrangellia basalts, as culprit
201-199 Mil BC (Volcanism) – Continental split forming the Atlantic Ocean creating the Atlantic Magmatic Province flood basalts killing 20% of all marine life (seems like volcanism and plate-tectonics are guilty here)
65,5 Mil BC (± 0.049) (Impact) – At the K/P boundary Antarctica had a subtropical climate and flora, complete with a marsupial fauna. Work at Seymour Island, Antarctica showed two separate extinction events near the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary 150,000 years from each other. 75% of plant and animal species on Earth became extinct
Although impacts normally has a larger dating error the Chicxulub impact crater was precision dated at 66,038 Mil BC with a 19,000 year tolerance, and does not correspond with the KT boundary. Currently the KT boundary date seems to have moved to 66 million years to make it fit in articles. The Chicxulub impact has caused its own extinction earlier but must have been overrun by the much bigger Shiva impact
The hypothesis by Sankar Chatterjee, a paleontologist at Texas Tech University in Lubbock claims it was multiple impacts with the Shiva impact that created the KT boundary event. This can be concluded from the K-T clay boundary layer in India that is one meter thick – the thickest in the world. It also fit the time the Indian plate started speeding up to a speed not associated with plate tectonics
The impact position and timeframe fit the spike of volcanism at the Deccan traps. However the problem for precision dating the Shiva crater arises due to the oil companies and the Indian government controlling the site where Shiva is located, and access is extremely limited (for some reason impact sites do not seem to be taken seriously by science or maybe politicians, because studies on impacts are rare. Many are unconfirmed but not scientifically looked at)
10,835-10,735 BC (Impact & Climate) – I think we can start the 6th major extinction around this time. We can also assume that it begins with an impact swarm at the onset of the Younger Dryas event. Lately too much evidence worldwide came to light that indicates a multi impact scenario. It is clear there were many short-term events over the last 12,000+ years that challenged life multiple times. There are also many opinions that differ about possible causes that is why I like to put supernovas in the spotlight as another possibility.

edit on Fri Aug 28 2020 by DontTreadOnMe because: LINK TO PART 2




posted on Aug, 26 2020 @ 07:19 PM
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Supernovas:

Most major disturbances of earth's biosphere can be attributed to the explosion shock waves of supernovas. The duration of supernova debris stream flowing past Earth growing in intensity till around the middle, can last many years. Heating spikes at the end of glaciations periods correlates well with supernova shock and debris streams. We see it, then get the shockwave, after which the cosmic debris (particles) start building up causing heat. When they eventually die down it always leads to a balancing cooling period as the solar system returns to normal
The debris stream of Nova WZ Sagittae started in the 1965 to 1970 time region and seems to be at least part if not the main reason of our current climate warming episode with the solar system heating up (not only Earth)
Supernova impacts and the timing of megafauna extinctions and civilization collapses in the past 50,000 years also correlates with the times when the shock, debris streams and cooling down have impacted earth

Supernova Info

78,000 BC (Space) – Supernova G192.8-1.1
76,251 BC (Space) – Supernova G192.8-1.1 biosphere impact
70,000 BC (Space) – The Scholz’s Star binary system passed through the Oort Cloud
50,000 BC (Space) – Supernova Kesteven79, G33.6+0.1/?
46,304 BC (Space) – Supernova Kesteven79, G33.6+0.1/? biosphere impact
40,000 BC (Space) – Supernova Simesis 147/?
39,600 BC (Space) – Supernova Simesis 147/? biosphere impact
35,000 BC (Space) – Supernova Sagittarius A East/?
31,532 BC (Space) – Supernova Sagittarius A East/? biosphere impact
18,000 BC (Space) – Supernova W50/?
16,628 BC (Space) – Supernova HB 21 biosphere impact
16,000 BC (Space) – Supernova W50/? biosphere impact
15,437 BC (Space) – Supernova W50 debris stream
15,000 BC (Space) – Supernova G109.1-1.0
12,957 BC (Space) – Supernova G109.1-1.0 biosphere impact
12,818 BC (Space) – Supernova G109.1-1.0 debris stream
10,800-10,500 BC (Space) – Supernova Vela/II
10,500-2,500 BC (Space) – Comet Venus hit Mars and the transition from a long-duration highly elliptical orbit to a short-duration circular orbit began. (Velikovsky hypothesis) The Seven Destructive Earth Passes of Comet Venus
10,000 BC (Space) – Supernova G31.9+0.0
9,700 BC (Space) – Supernova Vela/II biosphere impact
8,000 BC (Space) – Supernova W51C
8,000 BC (Space) – Supernova G57.2+0.8
6,130 BC (Space) – Supernova W51C biosphere impact
6,092 BC (Space) – Supernova G31.9+0.0 biosphere impact
6,004 BC (Space) – Supernova W51C cosmic debris stream impact correlates with the end of the 8.2 Kiloyear Event
6,000-3,000 BC (Space) – Supernova Veil Nebula & Cygius Loop/?
5,804-2,804 BC (Space) – Supernova Veil Nebula & Cygius Loop/? biosphere impact
5,498 BC (Space) – Supernova G57.2+0.8 biosphere impact
4,700 BC (Space) – Supernova G296.7-0.9/?
4,500 BC (Space) – Supernova W44/?
3,900 BC (Space) – Supernova G43.3-0.2/?
3,400 BC (Space) – Supernova G32.0-4.9
3,166 BC (Space) – Supernova W44/? biosphere impact
2,530 BC (Space) – Supernova G32.0-4.9 biosphere impact
2,500 BC (Space) – Supernova G299
1,700 BC (Space) – Supernova Puppis-A
1,325 or 325 BC (Space) – Supernova G299 biosphere impact
439 BC (Space) – Supernova G296.7-0.9/? biosphere impact
130 BC (Space) – Hipparchus develops the first accurate star map and catalogue with over 850 of the brightest stars
121 BC (Other) – Roman armies enter Gaul. They could however not overpower the tribe of chief Vitalstatistix with Asterix & Obelix in the lead. They were invisible due to magic potion made by their Drude Getafix. The famous musician Cacofonix lived during this time (Humour - except the part where the Romans entered Gaul)
0-100 AD (Space) – Supernova RCW103/?
118 AD (±500years) (Space) – Supernova 386, G11 2-0.3/II
185 AD (Space) – Supernova 185/1a
413 AD (Space) – Supernova 393(RXJ1713.73946)/1a biosphere impact
467-460 AD (Space) – Supernova G43.3-0.2/? biosphere impact
766 AD (Space) – Supernova Puppis-A biosphere impact
894 AD (Space) – Supernova 393(RXJ1713.73946)/1a debris stream
1006 AD (Space) – Supernova 1006/?
1054 AD (Space) – Supernova 1054 (Crab)/II
1250 AD (Space) – Supernova Vela Jr/?
1272 AD (Space) – Supernova 185/1a biosphere impact
1337 AD (Space) – Supernova Vela Jr/? biosphere impact
1452 AD (Space) – Supernova RCW103/? biosphere impact
1752 AD (Space) – Supernova 386, G11 2-0.3/II biosphere impact
1901 AD (Space) – Supernova GK Persei/1a
2010 AD (Space) – Supernova 1054 (Crab)/II biosphere impact
2012 AD (Space) – Supernova 1006/? biosphere impact
2101 AD (Space) – Supernova GK Persei/1a biosphere impact



edit on 1C202020-08-26T19:34:52-05:00WednesdayAmerica/Chicago2 by ICycle2 because: Link



posted on Aug, 26 2020 @ 07:20 PM
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The Sun:

We really need to incorporate the electrical universe theory. I do not have a problem with comet ice melting forming a tail, but when a comet is too far from the sun it can only be electrical discharges in plasma/magnetic-fields we see glowing
The CME’s and electrical discharges could however change if the sun throws the tantrum we can only theorise about. I think I saw one in the unedited 01/02 10 2011 comet that hits the sun and I’m still convinced that if the blowout was directed to Earth, we were in big trouble (KFC all around on the receiving side, but I do not see a week of warming. Yes, damage to the ozone layer will longer to recover – maybe this is how a Star gets over aggressive – the harder someone pinch me the higher I jump)
The Neat comet that came around the Sun in December 2002 – March 2003 was a monster and nearly as big as the sun and caused the "Halloween Events" of October/November 2003 that were not reflected by the normal sunspot numbers and behaviour (cycles). (Maybe Planet X fooled everyone and came early, causing some changes/damage in our plasma protection)

Sea Levels:

Data on sea levels show a trend of rising in bursts but currently seems normal in Durban, South Africa for the past 3,000-4,000 years with an average of ± 1.49 mm/yr. Extreme weather does cause damage that needs rehabilitation. Some continental plates around the world are most probably sinking where the measurements is going crazy.

Plate tectonics:

Plate movement is the biggest local contributor towards climate. It affects secondary influences like sea currents, wind directions and many more.

Conclusion:

Antarctica is not heading towards an ice free period as its dead centre on top of the South Pole and we know that the angle of the Sun is the most influential in climate cycles (Even Mercury got ice on its Northern Pole with the day side temperatures reaching 427 °C)
Antarctica is controlling Earth’s climate since millions of years ago when it started migrating to the South Pole accumulating ice. I also do not believe this is the first time Earth experienced this extremes climate fluctuations which are getting more extreme, because there were more severe ice ages before our time. (There must have been landmasses on a pole or both accumulating ice during heavy Ice ages)
Currently we are supposed to be in or close proximity of a glaciations period according to normal cycles. I cannot prove a supernova stream gave us extra time since the late 60’s but can’t find any other explanation that correlate with this time except “Rolling Thunder”. The problem is we are busy going into a natural quiet period of the Sun that I hope is just a mini cold period. If it combines with the supernova cooling period we are in trouble, but who knows, we do not seem to be at the right spot of the Milankovitch Cycles. But the big freeze and food shortages is coming (Welcome to the lockdown exercise, scientific infighting with lies and mayhem – time for survival mode)

The list “Birth – 0 AD”



All information in this combination list are based on scientific information, ancient literature, myths, videos, private opinions and will be outdated. It still could be useful as quick reference as I did a few updates, but please research dates of interests to confirm. All non relevant information added came from interesting articles

Extinctions – color=red
Volcano’s – Volcanic explosion index – VEI5 an higher – color=orange
Earthquakes/Plate tectonics – Magnitude 8 or above, swarms, high death toll and/or severe/wide damaged – color=brown
Landslides – Large slides listed – color=green
Impacts or Space influences – Above 10km craters or multiple impacts (Body-size/Crater-size) – color=purple
“Headlines”, Tsunamis, Flooding and Sea levels – Any destructive listed – color=teal
Climate – Inside ice-ages or notable cooling periods – color=white
Climate – Relatively warm or notable warming periods – color=pink
Climate – Earth is frying – color=maroon
Magnetic field – Reversals or influence – color=blue
Atmosphere and (info) – color=beige
Unexplained or Other – color=yellow


Hadean Eon – (4,567-4,000 Mil BC) – (4.567-4 Billion BC)



4,567 Mil BC (Other) – The Sun was only 70% of current level
4,450 Mil BC (Impact) – The Moon is to believe to accretes from fragments of a collision between the Earth and a planetoid believed to be a Mars-sized body, called Theia
4,450 Mil BC (Atmosphere) – The atmosphere were mostly hydrogen and helium that escaped into space
4,450 Mil BC (Other) – An Earth day was 7 hours long
4,445 Mil BC (Other) – Tidal locking cause’s one side of the Moon to face the Earth permanently
4,404 Mil BC (Other) – The oldest dated zircon crystals of Hadean rocks enclosed in sandstone with evidence of liquid water in Western Australia were found, while others younger rocks during this Eon were found in Western Greenland and North-western Canada. Minerals were also found in rocks that point to the existence of plate tectonics as early as 4,000 million years ago
4,280 Mil BC (Other) – Water started condensing into liquid form
4,100-3,800 Mil BC (Multiple Impacts) – The Late Heavy Bombardment dated at 3,900 Mil BC on the Moon rocks collected by Apollo (An earlier date could have been “reset” by later impacts)



posted on Aug, 26 2020 @ 07:21 PM
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Archean Eon – (4,000-2,500 Mil BC) – Eoarchean Era – (4,000-3,600 Mil BC)



3,950 Mil BC (Other) – Rocks in Labrador, Canada. Graphite found in sedimentary rocks revealed that the geochemical signature came from the decomposition of living organisms. They were “biogenic," meaning it was produced by living organisms
3,900 Mil BC (Other) – An Earth day was 14.4 hours long
3,900 Mil BC (Atmosphere) – The atmosphere became mostly carbon dioxide, water vapor, methane and ammonia
3,900 -2,700 Mil BC (Other) – The existence of a hypothetical continent Ur/Vaalbara was proposed due to similarities between the Transvaal Basin craton in South Africa and the Hamersley Basin craton in Australia. This is scientifically not agreed upon as Earth was believed to hot and volcanic without plate tectonics for continents to form and therefore just the product of global processes forming cratons
(The problem with not believing in continents at this stage is the large meteorite impacts between 3,500 and 3,200 million years ago detectable in the Kaapvaal Barberton granite-greenstone terrain and Pilbara's eastern block. Also 2,900 million years ago the first record of glaciations in the Pongola region of the now Southern Africa was found, although the find is restricted to that area and may represent regional glaciations.)
3,870 Mil BC (Other) – Traces of microbial life and photosynthesis in the Pilbara and Kaapvaal cratons which contains well-preserved Archaean microfossils. A series of international drilling projects has revealed it in both Africa and Australia
3,700 Mil BC (Other) – Indirect evidence of life comes from banded iron formations in greenstones

Paleoarchean Era – (3,600-3,200 Mil BC)

3,460 Mil BC (Impact) – Marble Bar Spherules, Pilbara, Western Australia (??km/100's of km) – (geological evidence but crater undiscovered due to erosion)
3,260 Mil BC (Impact) – Barberton Greenstone Belt, Transvaal, Southern Africa (37–58km/500km) – (geological evidence but crater undiscovered due to erosion)

Mesoarchean Era – (3,200-2,800 Mil BC)

3,000 Mil BC (Atmosphere) – The atmosphere was 75% nitrogen and 15% carbon dioxide
3,000 Mil BC (Other) – The Sun was 80% of current level
3,000 Mil BC (Impact) – Maniitsoq crater, Greenland (??km/100km) – (unconfirmed)
2,900-2,780 Mil BC (Climate) – The Mozaan Ice-age at the Transvaal Basin (craton) of the Ur/Vaalbara continent the current Pongola region of South Africa
2,800 Mil BC (Magnetic field) – Oldest record of Earth's magnetic field
2,800-2,700 Mil BC (Plate-tectonics) – Ur/Vaalbara started to break up

Neoarchean Era – (2,800-2,500 Mil BC)

2,707-2,704 Mil BC (Volcanism) – The Blake River Mega caldera complex start forming
2,700 Mil BC (Plate-tectonics) – The super-continent Kenorland formed
2,700-2,400 Mil BC (Climate & Atmosphere) – The temperature was similar to today and atmospheric oxygen content 0.1%
2,600-1,130 Mil BC (Impact) – Yarrabubba, Western Australia (??km/30km)

Proterozoic Eon – (2,500-542 Mil BC) : Paleoproterozoic Era – (2,500-1,600 Mil BC) : Siderian Period – (2,500-2,300 Mil BC)

2,480-2,450 Mil BC (Volcanism & Plate tectonics) – The Mistassini and Matachewan dike swarms formed as well as sedimentary rift-basins/rift-margins on other continents.
2,480-2,100 Mil BC (Plate-tectonics) – The super-continent Kenorland broke up that was believed to contain Laurentia (the core of today's North America and Greenland), Baltica (today's Scandinavia and Baltic), Western Australia and Kalaharia
2,450-2,100 Mil BC (Climate) – Huronian Ice-age
2,420 Mil BC (Volcanism – Widgiemooltha complex in the current Australia
2,400 Mil BC (Impact) – Suavjärvi, Russia (??km/16km)
2,400 Mil BC (Atmosphere) – A jump in Oxygen called the “Great Oxidation Event” caused by Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae)

Rhyacian Period – (2,300-2,050 Mil BC)

2,300-2,050 Mil BC (Volcanism) – This period was high in volcanism building igneous complexes all over some that is rich in mineral and igneous rocks. Earth was a volcanic rock
2,220 Mil BC (Volcanism) – The Ungava complex in Canada
2,050 Mil BC (Volcanism) – The Bushveld complex in Africa

Orosirian Period – (2,050-1,800 Mil BC)

2,050-1,800 Mil BC (Plate tectonics) – This period was known for its continent (mountain) building/breaking involving plate tectonics
2,023 Mil BC (Impact) – Vredefort, South Africa (??km/300km)
2,000 Mil BC (Impact) – Bohemia, Czech Republic (??km/400km) – (unconfirmed)
2,000 Mil BC (Other) – The Sun was 85% of current level
2,400 Mil BC (Atmosphere) – Oxygen starts accumulating in the atmosphere
1,850 Mil BC (Impact) – Sudbury, Ontario, Canada (??km/60-250km)

Statherian Period – (1,800-1,600 Mil BC)

1,800-1,600 Mil BC (Other) – Believed to be a period of calmness where Earth started reaching a firm stable state. Complex single-celled life appeared
1,800-1,600 Mil BC (Plate tectonics) – A general starting point for continents and how Earth looked. Slowly but surely the scientists are piecing together a picture of the breakups and formations. It is believed that a super continent “Columbia” formed during this period as Earth’s crust thickens and stabilize (Columbia, also known as Nuna and Hudsonland, was the reassembly of continental blocks either from Ur/Vaalbara (2,700 million years ago) or Kenorland (2,400 million years ago). Columbia contained most of Earth’s current blocks)
1,800 Mil BC (Impact) – Paasselkä, Finland (??km/10km)



posted on Aug, 26 2020 @ 07:21 PM
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1,750 Mil BC (Volcanism) – The Timpton complex in Northern China
1,660 Mil BC (Impact) – Amelia Creek, Northern Territory, Australia (??km/20km)
1,630 Mil BC (Impact) – Shoemaker, Western Australia (??km/30km)

Mesoproterozoic Era – (1,600-1,000 Mil BC) : Calymmian Period – (1,600-1,400 Mil BC)

1,600 -1,400 Mil BC (Other) – Origin of ancestral of all animals, plants and fungi (Not a chance I originate from LUCA, nor are a Chimp my cousin. But I do understand my human body will have strains of living organisms altering my DNA/RNA through the ages.)
1,600 -1,400 Mil BC (Atmosphere) – Oxygen reached above 10% in the atmosphere and Ozone layer begins to form blocking UV radiation
1,520 Mil BC (Volcanism) – The Essakane complex in Eastern Africa
1,500 Mil BC (Impact) – Lycksele structure, Sweden (??km/130km) – (unconfirmed)
1,500-1,350 Mil BC (Plate-tectonics) – Columbia/Nuna started to break up

Ectasian Period – (1,400-1,200 Mil BC)

1,400-1,200 Mil BC (Other) – In this period we know the development of green (Chlorobionta) and red (Rhodophyta) algae took place
1,300 Mil BC (Plate-tectonics) – Rodinia started to form, although little is known about the exact configuration due to “snow-ball” earth in the later part of this era
1,270 Mil BC (Volcanism) – The Mackenzie Large Igneous Province formed
1,200 Mil BC (Impact) – Björkö, Sweden (??km/10km) – (unconfirmed)
1,200 Mil BC (Impact) – Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA (??km/6-13km)
1,200 Mil BC (Impact) – Stac Fada Member (??km/40km)

Stenian Period – (1,200-1,000 Mil BC)

1,200 Mil BC (Other) – Indication that sexual reproduction has started on Earth
1,170 Mil BC (Impact) – Ullapool, offshore of Loch Broom, Scotland (??km/150km) – (unconfirmed)
1,150-1,140 Mil BC (Impact) – Keurusselkä, Finland (??km/30km)
1,100-750 Mil BC (Atmosphere & Climate) – Oxygen content was 4% of the atmosphere and the temperature was similar to today, with ice ages
1,070 Mil BC (Impact) – Bosumtwi, Ghana (??km/10.5km)

Neoproterozoic Era – (1,000-542 Mil BC) : Tonian Period – (1,000-850 Mil BC)

1,000 Mil BC (Other) – Multicellular organisms appear
950 Mil BC (Climate) – Start of Stuartian-Varangian ice age
920 Mil BC (Volcanism) – The Dashigou complex in Eastern China formed
900 Mil BC (Other) – An Earth day was 18 hours long and the Moon is 350,000 km from Earth

Cryogenian Period – (850-630 Mil BC)

830 Mil BC (Space) – The Eulalia family of asteroids formed. It is the parent body of the near-Earth asteroids Bennu and Ryugu.
820 Mil BC (Volcanism) – The Gairdner in Australia formed
800 Mil BC (Impact) – Due to Moon impacts studies an asteroid shower must have hit Earth. The combined total mass must have been 10 to 100 times larger than that of the KT boundary impact
750 Mil BC (Plate tectonics) – The breakup of Rodinia
750 Mil BC (Magnetic field) – Magnetic reversal
725 Mil BC (Volcanism) – The Franklin complex in Canada formed
720-635 Mil BC (Climate) – Stuartian-Varangian Ice-age had 2 “Snowball Earth” periods believed to come close or even covered the Equator
700 Mil BC (Impact) – Bohemian circular structure, Czech Republic (??km/260-300km) – (unconfirmed)
700 Mil BC (Impact) – Jänisjärvi, Russia (??km/14km)
650 Mil BC (Extinction) – Mass extinction of 70% sea plants due to global glaciations ("Snowball Earth" hypothesis)
650 Mil BC (Other) – The Moon was 357,000 km from Earth
646 Mil BC (Impact) – Strangways, Northern Territory, Australia (??km/25km)
635-548 Mil BC (Climate) – The Earth was hot
633 Mil BC (Plate-tectonics) – Pannotia start forming

Ediacaran (Vendian) Period – (630-542 Mil BC)

600 Mil BC (Other) – An Earth day is 20.7 hours long
600 Mil BC (Other) – The presence of artistic metalwork in North America. (A bell shaped metallic vessel broken in two parts came from inside a blown-up rock of this age at Meeting House Hill, Boston-Dorchester area now called the Roxbury conglomerate)
600 Mil BC (Impact) – Beaverhead, Idaho and Montana, USA (??km/60km)
590 Mil BC (Impact) – Acraman, South Australia (??mk/90km)
575 Mil BC (Impact) – Luizi, DRC (??km/17km)
573-540 Mil BC (Plate tectonics) – Pannotia start fragmenting into Laurasia and Gondwana. Laurasia included what are now North America, Europe, Siberia, and Greenland. Gondwana included what are now India, Africa, South America, and Antarctica
570 Mil BC (Climate) – End of Stuartian-Varangian ice age
570 Mil BC (Impact) – Spider, Western Australia (??km/13km)
550 Mil BC (Impact) – Kelly West, Northern Territory, Australia (??km/10km)
548-488.3 Mil BC (Atmosphere) – The highest concentrations of CO2 during this Period was nearly 7000 ppm
548-238 Mil BC (Other) – The accepted hypothesis seem to be that during the Cambrian period Western Antarctica was beginning to form in the Northern Hemisphere because of the deposits of large amounts sandstone, limestone and shale’s. Eastern Antarctica was at the equator, where sea floor invertebrates and trilobites flourished in the tropical seas



posted on Aug, 26 2020 @ 07:22 PM
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545 Mil BC (Impact) – Multiple impact rings, Northern Territory, Australia (??km/500-2000km) – (unconfirmed)
542 Mil BC (Impact) – Bangui magnetic anomaly, Central African Republic (??km/600-800km) – (discredited but still on unconfirmed list)
542 Mil BC (Impact) – Middle-Urals Ring structure, Russia (??km/500km) – (unconfirmed)

Phanerozoic Eon – (542 Mil BC to present) : Paleozoic Era – (542-251 Mil BC) : Cambrian Period – (542-488.3 Mil BC)

515 Mil BC (Impact) – Lawn Hill, Queensland, Australia (??km/18km)
510 Mil BC (Other) – The Sun was 94% of current level
508 Mil BC (Impact) – Glikson, Western Australia, Australia (??km/19km)
500 Mil BC (Impact) – Presqu'île, Quebec, Canada (??km/24km)
500-250 Mil BC (Impact) – Wilkes Land, Antarctica (??km/485km) – (unconfirmed)

Ordovician Period – (488.3-443.7 Mil BC) : Lower (488.3 to 471.8 Mil BC)

488.3-443.7 Mil BC (Volcanism) – Scafells, Lake District, England (VEI-8)
488.3-443.7 Mil BC (Atmosphere) – Fall in atmospheric carbon dioxide
480 Mil BC (Plate tectonics) – A microcontinent named Avalonia – a landmass incorporating fragments of what would become eastern Newfoundland, the southern British Isles, and parts of Belgium, northern France, Nova Scotia, New England, South Iberia and northwest Africa – broke free from Gondwana and began its journey to Laurentia. While all this was happening, Gondwana drifted slowly towards the South Pole. This was the first step of the formation of Pangaea
470 Mil BC (Impact) – Due to a Moon impact study an large meteoroid shower must have hit Earth – (unconfirmed)
470 Mil BC (Impact) – Ames, Oklahoma, USA (??km/16km)
460-430 Mil BC (Impact) – Ishim impact structure, Akmola region, Kazakhstan (??km/300km) – (unconfirmed)
450 Mil BC (Impact) – Slate Islands, Ontario, Canada (??km/30km)
450 Mil BC (Volcanism) – Southeast of present Alabama, North America and Scandinavia (VEI-8)
450-420 Mil BC (Climate & Atmosphere) – The Andean-Saharan Ice-age was a minor ice-age period on the Gondwana continent (the core of today's East Antarctica, Australia, Africa and India). CO2 was 4400 ppm and global temperatures were as low as they are today
443 Mil BC (Climate & Extinctions) – Glaciation of Gondwana and the second largest mass extinction

Silurian Period – (443.7-416 Mil BC) : Llandovery (443.7 to 428.2 Mil BC)

440 Mil BC (Plate tectonics) – The second step in the formation of Pangaea was the collision of Gondwana with Euramerica. Baltica had already collided with Laurentia, forming Euramerica
420 Mil BC (Volcanism) – Glen Coe, Scotland (VEI-8)
[color= pink]420 Mil BC (Climate) – End of Andean-Saharan ice age
420 Mil BC (Other) – Stabilization of the earth's climate and land plants and coral reefs appeared
420-360 Mil BC (Climate) – The Earth was hot
420-416 Mil BC (Plate tectonics) – North and South China split from Gondwana and started to head northward
416 Mil BC (Other) – Earth day is 21.8 hours long and forests begin developing

Devonian Period – (416-359.2 Mil BC) : Lower (416.0 to 397.5 Mil BC)

410-70 Mil BC (Impact) – Saqqar, Saudi Arabia (??km/34km)
400 Mil BC (Impact) – Nicholson, Northwest Territories, Canada (??km/12.5km)
380 Mil BC (Impact) – Kaluga, Russia (??km/15km)
376.8 Mil BC (Impact) – Siljan, Sweden (??km/52km)
375 Mil BC (Atmosphere) – Atmospheric oxygen level is about 16%
375 Mil BC (Impact) – Panther Mountain, New York, USA (??km/10km) – (unconfirmed)
374 Mil BC (Climate & Extinction) – Global cooling with surface temperatures dropping around 8°C and 70% of marine species gets extinct. This was a prolonged series of extinctions occurring over 20 million years. Evidence of anoxia in oceanic bottom waters, surface temperatures dropped from about 93°F (34°C) to about 78°F (26°C)
370 Mil BC (Volcanism) – The Kola-Kneiper complex in the South Kola peninsula of North-West Russia formed
367 Mil BC (Impact) – Alamo impact, Nevada, USA (??km/100+km) – (unconfirmed)
365 Mil BC (Impact) – Lake Tai, Jiangsu, China (??km/65km) – (airburst)
364 Mil BC (Impact) – Woodleigh Sation, South Gippsland, Australia (??km/60-120km)
360 Mil BC (Impact) – East Warburton Basin, South Australia (??km/200km) – (unconfirmed)
360 Mil BC (Impact) – West Warburton Basin, South Australia (??km/200km) – (unconfirmed)
360 Mil BC (Atmosphere) & Climate) – CO2 in the Early Carboniferous Period were approximately 1500 ppm and temperatures were as low as they are today
360-280 Mil BC (Climate) – The Karoo Ice-age had extensive glaciations on the Gondwana continent the current Karoo region of South Africa, Australia, Antarctica, India and South America. The Laurasia continent the current Europe, Greenland, Siberia, North America, Kazakhstan, and N.China was believed to be ice free



posted on Aug, 26 2020 @ 07:22 PM
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Carboniferous Period – (359.2-299 Mil BC)

359 BC (Space & Extinction) – The Devonian-Carboniferous boundary contain hundreds of thousands of generations of plant spores that appear to be sunburnt by ultraviolet light — evidence of a long-lasting ozone-depletion due to a possible Supernova event
350-130 Mil BC (Impact) – Prince Albert, Northwest Territories, Canada (??km/25km)
350-324 Mil BC (Atmosphere) – Oxygen levels increase
345 Mil BC (Impact) – Aorounga, Chad (??km/12.6km)
345 Mil BC (Impact – Gweni-Fada, Chad (??km/14km)
342 Mil BC (Impact) – Charlevoix, Quebec, Canada (??km/54km)
325 Mil BC (Impact) – Weaubleau-Osceola, Missouri, USA (??km/15km) – (unconfirmed)
324 Mil BC (Plate tectonics) – Seas covered parts of the continents
320-260 Mil BC (estimated) (Other) – A small eight-carat gold chain about ten inches in length of skilled workmanship was found naturally imbedded inside a lump of Carboniferous coal from this age in Morrisonville, Illinois State, USA
315-270 Mil BC (Atmosphere) – This is the only time period in the last 600 million years when both atmospheric CO2 (350 ppm) and temperatures (reduced about 12° C) were as low as they are today
307-305 Mil BC (Climate) – A shift from tropical to temperate climate appears to have occurred
300 Mil BC (Impact) – Gnargoo, Western Australia (??km/75km) – (unconfirmed)
300 Mil BC (Impact) – Serra da Cangalha, Brazil (??km/12km)
300 Mil BC (Other) – Earth day is 22.4 hours long
300 Mil BC (Impact) – Snows Island, South Carolina, USA (??km/11km) – (unconfirmed)
300 Mil BC (Impact) – Unnamed impact, Cooper Basin, Queensland, Australia (??km/130km) – (unconfirmed)
300-58 Mil BC (Climate, Plate tectonics, Volcanism & Impacts) – Earth was tempered to tropical (very much the same as today) with active plate movement, volcanism and some impact hick-ups. Laurasia and Gondwana started too rejoined and form the supercontinent Pangea, which then started to break up again, forming the Earth we know today
300-280 Mil BC (Atmosphere) – Atmospheric oxygen levels reach over 30%

Permian Period – (299-252,17 Mil BC)

290 Mil BC (Impact) – Clearwater East, Quebec, Canada (??km/26km)
290 Mil BC (Impact) – Clearwater West, Quebec, Canada (??km/36km)
290 Mil BC (Impact) – Loch Leven, Scotland (??km/18x8km) – (unconfirmed)
280 Mil BC (Impact) – Ternovka, Ukraine (??km/11km)
275 Mil BC (Climate) – Laurasia and Gondwana started too rejoined and form the supercontinent Pangea with ice vanishing from the poles that would last until around 55 million years ago.
260 Mil BC (Volcanism) – An ancient eruption in Southwest China formed the Emeishan Traps (VEI-9+)
252.28 Mil BC (±11,000 years) (Volcanism, Atmosphere, Extinction & Climate) – The Triassic–Jurassic extinction was Earth's worst Mass extinction that eliminated 90% of ocean dwellers, and 70% of land plants and animals. It lasted less than 200,000 years and corresponds to a glaciations period. Sediment layers with an accuracy of 35,000 years in the Nanpanjiang basin in southern China prove this extinction period with a sea-water level decreased for around 80,000 years
Although the Siberian traps started 400,000 years before the main extinction it was a double extinction with the Siberian trap peeking 500,000 years after the glaciations period.
The Siberia Traps has the largest known deposited of lava and volcanic rocks on land and lasted for around 900,000 years with the main trap forming event less than 60,000 years at 500,000 years after the Permian-Triassic boundary extinction. With massif atmospheric changes and greenhouse gas releases (Oxygen (O2) levels dropped from 30% to 12% and Carbon dioxide (CO2) level was below 2000 ppm) and a global upward jump in temperature reach 50-60°C on land, and 40°C at the sea surface (this misery is far from solved, studies seem to prove the ocean extinction 1,5 million years after the boundary extinction)



posted on Aug, 26 2020 @ 07:22 PM
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Mesozoic Era – (252,17-65,5 Mil BC) : Triassic Period – (252,17-199,6 Mil BC)

250 Mil BC (Other) – Wilkes Land, Antarctica – Arganaty, Kazakhstan – Bedout, offshore Western Australia and the Malvinas Plateau anomaly, Falkland, Atlantic Ocean are 4 massif hits with between 250–485km craters. They are all within the error margin of dating and could easily have been responsible for the temperature spike during the second extinction around the 252.28 Million BC period. There were also 2 massif volcanic events around 250 Million BC with the near Java undersea plateau in the South Pacific and one of the largest volcano events under Africa
250 Mil BC (Estimated) (Volcanism) – One of the largest ever volcano events occurred under Africa
250 Mil BC (Estimated) (Volcanism) – Other large volcano events occurred near Java in the South Pacific forming an undersea plateau 20 miles thick
250 Mil BC (Impact) – Arganaty, Kazakhstan (??km/300km) – (unconfirmed)
250 Mil BC Impact) – Bedout, offshore of Western Australia (??km/250km) – (unconfirmed)
250 Mil BC (Impact) – Lorne Basin, New South Wales, Australia (??km/30km) – (unconfirmed)
250 Mil BC (Impact) – Malvinas Plateau anomaly, Falkland, Atlantic Ocean (??km/250-300km) – (unconfirmed)
244.7 Mil BC (Impact) – Araguainha, Brazil (??km/40km)
[color=orange 232 Mil BC (Volcanism, Plate tectonics, Extinction, Atmosphere & Climate) – Durring the “Carnian Pluvial Episode” shock events there were four pulses of warming and climate perturbation, all within a million years that have led to repeated extinctions. The climates shuttled from dry to humid and back to dry again possibly due to eruptions in western Canada, represented today by the great Wrangellia basalts. The Carnian Pluvial Event was a regional climatic perturbation mostly visible in the western Tethys that could be related to the uplift of a new mountain range, the Cimmerian Orogen
220 Mil BC (Impact) – Saint Martin, Manitoba, Canada (??km/40km)
214 Mil BC (Impact) – Manicouagan, Quebec, Canada (??km/85km)
214 Mil BC (Impact) – Rochechouart, France (??km/23km)
[color=orange 201-199 Mil BC (Volcanism, Plate tectonics, & Extinction) – Continental split forming the Atlantic Ocean creating the Atlantic Magmatic Province flood basalts killing 20% of all marine life
200 Mil BC (Impact) – Guarda, Portugal (??km/30km)
200 Mil BC (Impact) – Kurai Basin, Altai, Russia (??km/20km) – (unconfirmed)
200 Mil BC (Impact) – Wells Creek, Tennessee, USA (??km/12km)

The rest of the list to follow next week, it’s getting to big

MOD NOTE
LINK TO PART 2

edit on Fri Aug 28 2020 by DontTreadOnMe because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 26 2020 @ 08:32 PM
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That we know about lol .
Ok thing is we are not just some bird or dino . Humans will eat any thing if Every last mammal went extinct we would just eat reptilians . If they went extinct we would eat roaches lol .

There is only one or 2 gratned way to kill us off thous would be a 99 % extinction .
Heck humans adapated to even living in space there is no environment we could not find a way to live in .



posted on Aug, 26 2020 @ 09:45 PM
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yes, LIFE.....finds a way

always finds some way

a reply to: midnightstar



posted on Aug, 27 2020 @ 01:23 AM
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originally posted by: midnightstar
That we know about lol .
Ok thing is we are not just some bird or dino . Humans will eat any thing if Every last mammal went extinct we would just eat reptilians . If they went extinct we would eat roaches lol .

There is only one or 2 gratned way to kill us off thous would be a 99 % extinction .
Heck humans adapated to even living in space there is no environment we could not find a way to live in .


Agreed, we are just a virus that adapts and spreads.



posted on Aug, 27 2020 @ 03:49 AM
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I really like the premise of the OP. Thanks for the information.

But so much text!

I think there are times when TMI applies. Give us the highlights, synopsis and analysis. Use sources for the rest.

I'm not complaining. If anything many OP's today are woefully lacking in "real" information. But I had a hard time reading through that long list.

Maybe it's just me and I need to go off in the corner just STFU...



posted on Aug, 27 2020 @ 03:56 AM
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Nah, we figured this out about 10 years ago here on ATS.

Some guy in China pokes a yellow blob with a stick and causes the end of the world.


edit on 27-8-2020 by charlyv because: spelling , where caught



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