It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

New Largest Know Star in the Universe-Stephenson 2-18

page: 1
23
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 05:46 PM
link   
Move over UY Scuti, the former title holder for the largest known star in the Universe, we have a new champion named Stephenson 2-18. UY Scuti was believed to be 1700 times the size of our sun, but after new discoveries and newer more better measurements, the size of UY Scuti has been downgraded to about 900 times the size of our sun. Stephenson 2-18 on the other hand, has a size about 2150 times the size of our Sun. So, if you think about it, Stephenson is larger than UY Scuti even if it hadn't been downgraded in size.



The diameter of the Sun is about 864,938 miles. So, if you multiply 864,938 x 2150 then you get: 1,859,616,700 miles! Wow! try to wrap your mind around that, ATS. A star that's One billion, eight hundred fifty-nine million, six hundred sixteen thousand, and 700 miles in diameter! It's yuge! We have a new stellar champion! What says ATS?
www.youtube.com...
edit on Tue Aug 25 2020 by Jbird because: bbcode




posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 05:51 PM
link   
a reply to: lostbook



A star that's One billion, eight hundred fifty-nine million, six hundred sixteen thousand, and 700 miles in diameter!

Which gives it a volume of 10 billion times that of the Sun.

Yup, that's a big 'un. It would include the orbit of Saturn.



edit on 8/21/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 06:00 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: lostbook



A star that's One billion, eight hundred fifty-nine million, six hundred sixteen thousand, and 700 miles in diameter!

Which gives it a volume of 10 billion times that of the Sun.

Yup, that's a big 'un. It would include the orbit of Saturn.


Yeah, I can't even imagine anything being that big. It's like trying to wrap you mind around infinity.



posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 06:02 PM
link   
I suppose the ocean of Space allows for things to get this big. Much like Earth's oceans allow for things to grow much larger than they would on land.



posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 06:03 PM
link   
What if it has large planets with giant Aliens, we would be microbes to them. : O



posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 06:06 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

I would like to visit Saturn one day.



posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 06:08 PM
link   

originally posted by: CraftyArrow
What if it has large planets with giant Aliens, we would be microbes to them. : O


I've wondered about that in the past. Everything IS relative, you know.



posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 06:14 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: lostbook



A star that's One billion, eight hundred fifty-nine million, six hundred sixteen thousand, and 700 miles in diameter!

Which gives it a volume of 10 billion times that of the Sun.

Yup, that's a big 'un. It would include the orbit of Saturn.


I did a little digging, Phage. The star would extend past Uranus also.





Uranus
Planet

Description
Description: Uranus is the seventh planet from the Sun. Its name is a reference to the Greek god of the sky, Uranus, who, according to Greek mythology, was the grandfather of Zeus and father of Cronus. It has the third-largest planetary radius and fourth-largest planetary mass in the Solar System. Wikipedia
Orbital period: 84 years
Distance from Sun: 1.784 billion mi

edit on 21-8-2020 by lostbook because: paragraph edit



posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 06:25 PM
link   
When this goes supernova 🤯



posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 06:34 PM
link   
a reply to: lostbook




The star would extend past Uranus also.

No.

Think radius rather than diameter.



posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 06:39 PM
link   
a reply to: lostbook

Get in the car.
Were leaving shortly.



posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 08:34 PM
link   
a reply to: lostbook

Everything extends past Uranus when your head is so crammed up in it!!



[Look! My new role on ATS is‘Captain Obvious’ one-liners!]

My, that is a huge helium factory!! It is kind of amazing that it hasn’t collapsed on itself already!

Cool stuff!

Just imagine the solar power available from it!!

Crazy!




posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 08:34 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

Make one hell of a bang when goes supernova ………..!!!



posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 10:06 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: lostbook




The star would extend past Uranus also.

No.

Think radius rather than diameter.


Ok. That makes sense. Thanks!



posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 11:36 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: lostbook



A star that's One billion, eight hundred fifty-nine million, six hundred sixteen thousand, and 700 miles in diameter!

Which gives it a volume of 10 billion times that of the Sun.

Yup, that's a big 'un. It would include the orbit of Saturn.



At first it seemed unimaginalbly large....but after reading your post and mentally overlaying an image of the star over a graphic depiction of our solar system and imagining the edge of the star reaching to Saturn....it doesn't seem all that big now. I'm betting there's much larger ones out there. I wonder how large a star can get before it collapses under its own weight or gravity.



posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 11:41 PM
link   
a reply to: MissSmartypants

Saturn is really, really far away. I don't reckon the diagram you were looking at was to scale in regard to distances.


edit on 8/21/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 22 2020 @ 12:17 AM
link   
a reply to: Phage


youtu.be...


I like this one. They make a scale model in the desert if you haven’t seen it.
This one really shows how tiny we are floating around in the solar system.



posted on Aug, 22 2020 @ 12:35 AM
link   
a reply to: TexasTruth

My brother in law and I did that on a beach a few years ago. It was fun explaining to people what the hell we were doing.



posted on Aug, 22 2020 @ 12:35 AM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: MissSmartypants

Saturn is really, really far away. I don't reckon the diagram you were looking at was to scale in regard to distances.

No...what I meant was your post changed the unimaginalbly large into the imaginably large...that's all.
And for goodness sake... I'm well aware that Saturn is really, really far away. Hmph!



posted on Aug, 22 2020 @ 12:48 AM
link   
a reply to: MissSmartypants

I guess I misunderstood:

it doesn't seem all that big now.



new topics

top topics



 
23
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join