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Media appears to be ignoring good studies showing lasting immunity from having mild COVID 19

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posted on Aug, 17 2020 @ 12:08 PM
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a reply to: butcherguy

I was mentioning mutations in another thread. Apparently Iceland has isolated 4,400+ mutated strains. There will be no vaccine for the same reason we dont have a flu vaccine that works. Crazy enough though the bodies immune system tends to do better than a you shot against the flu if you have a properly functioning one.




posted on Aug, 17 2020 @ 12:09 PM
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originally posted by: Sookiechacha
a reply to: The2Billies

This is August. The virus was only isolated in January. Enough time hasn't passed to declare "lasting" immunity.

ETA: I'm not even going get into virus mutations.

Um. So you’re on professional/experiential par with the bona fides of major university research professors? Lmao




edit on 17-8-2020 by slatesteam because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2020 @ 01:34 PM
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originally posted by: slatesteam
originally posted by: Sookiechacha
a reply to: The2Billies


You need to read carefully before posting. LMAO

I said I had an office next to the Chemistry Department, never said I was in it. I was friends with them because of proximity. Although I did teach a class to many of the same students, I never claimed to be in their league.
However, I am greatly familiar with the good old boy system in all departments in all Universities of "You give me a good peer review and I'll give you one."

I did teach Research Methods, and know good research when I see it and know what people do to cheat. That was my job. That is why I find two separate studies, actually competing for who gets their results out first, by reputable immunologists to be far better when they come up with the same results than the nearly criminal current peer review system.



edit on 8/17/20 by The2Billies because: addition grammar



posted on Aug, 17 2020 @ 01:46 PM
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originally posted by: Sookiechacha
a reply to: network dude

The reason why we are encouraged to get a flu vaccination every year is because we don't have "lasting" immunity to a virus that continually mutates.

Roughly half the US population get annual flu shots, and when the flu season comes there is a wave of people infected with the flu, then the wave dies off because when people recover they have an immunity to the strain which made them sick. But the flu is constantly mutating and evolving so the next year we get another wave, and so on each year. We see the same thing happen with nearly any virus regardless of whether people are vaccinated, and we're seeing the exact same thing with Covid-19. Search "covid cases" in Google and then use the drop down menu on the chart tool to switch between states.

It gives a very clear picture of how far each US state is through the Covid-19 wave. Many states are currently moving past the peak and about 3/4 of the way through. Other states such as New York which were hit very hard due to the high population density are already well over the wave and have seen very flat figures for the last two months. The doom and gloom will not be lasting for as long as I think the left wants it to last regardless of how much they try to slow the spread and flatten the curve/wave. Herd immunity will be achieved one way or another and we'll most likely have to deal with new annual strains of Covid-19 like we do with the flu.

It may be a hard pill for some people to swallow but we will have to live with this virus and get life back to normal. There is no "new normal", there is only those who choose to live in fear and those who do not, and I refuse to live in fear. Interestingly, I live with a person who had a flu shot before winter and then when winter came around they caught the flu. Oddly enough I didn't catch the flu from them despite never getting flu shots. I get the flu maybe once every 2 years on average, which indicates my natural immunity lasts longer than artificial immunity and protects me from a wider range of flu viruses.

Obviously my personal experience isn't verifiable fact, but it's very hard deny places like New York and the UK don't have some form of herd immunity to Covid-19. It's especially obvious when you line up the riots and re-opening of businesses on the timeline of these case charts and you fail to see any correlations, in fact cases were dropping in the UK as riots started becoming wide spread and when people started packing onto beaches. I don't care if people want to take a vaccine for the flu or covid, but personally I trust my immune system which evolved over billions of years in preference to man-made substitutes.
edit on 17/8/2020 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2020 @ 02:07 PM
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a reply to: ChaoticOrder

Obviously, we don't have "herd immunity" from the flu, since so many of us get it year after year. We have built up some resistance to previous strains, but those clever viruses are always finding new and innovating ways to make our kind of life forms suffer!

FYI, I haven't gotten a flu shot in decades, and I'm pretty sure, no test, but, I had Covid 19 late last year into early January 2020. So, I have my fingers crossed I have some immunity and hope it doesn't come back on me. However, combined with flu symptoms, there's no telling what Covid 19 might do this fall to the general public.




edit on 17-8-2020 by Sookiechacha because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 17 2020 @ 02:21 PM
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a reply to: Sookiechacha

I think you're stretching the definition of herd immunity, it doesn't require having indefinite immunity. My point is, each year, after enough people in the "herd" gain immunity, the flu season ends and the number of cases remains small and steady, like the places which already have Covid-19 immunity. Herd immunity requires a large fraction of the population to be infected and recover and it may not seem like there are enough cases for herd immunity to occur. However, the widespread asymptomatic nature and highly effective propagation mechanism of Covid-19 means it can easily spread through populations without many people even knowing they had it.



posted on Aug, 17 2020 @ 03:36 PM
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Published on Apr 4, 2020

In this explosive second edition of Perspectives on the Pandemic, Professor Knut Wittkowski, for twenty years head of The Rockefeller University's Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Research Design, says that social distancing and lockdown is the absolutely worst way to deal with an airborne respiratory virus.

Prof. Dr. Knut Wittkowski - Is social distancing and lockdown on COVID-19 the wrong approach?


This interview stuck in my memory after I first watched it a few months ago because I've watched events unfold almost exactly as this guy described. It was swiftly removed by YouTube so you'll have to watch it at altcensored. Professor Wittkowski talks about the science of herd immunity and why over-flattening the curve is the wrong approach. That is why I've been writing about herd immunity so much, I wasn't just pulling this stuff from thin air. We are now seeing a mentality of preventing any new Covid-19 cases but that only prolongs the suffering.

Professor Wittkowski also points out how it's important to protect older people and other high risk groups, but we can allow herd immunity can occur in the lower risk groups. If a certain region did have it's health services strained then I would encourage stricter lockdown rules until the numbers dropped, but it's clear that most hospitals could have handled many more patients. In fact many hospital staff we placed on leave due to a lack of patients, especially the places with low density populations.

The approach our governments have chosen to take is based purely on emotions or political agendas and has nothing to do with science. Older people are at risk in the places which are now experiencing a massive second wave because they flattened to the curve so much there wasn't a curve and herd immunity couldn't occur. It endangers the high risk groups because they also want to come out of isolation and get back to living a normal life. Unfortunately hiding inside our houses for months doesn't fix anything, it only exasperates the problem.



posted on Aug, 17 2020 @ 03:55 PM
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People who have had any coronavirus like the common cold type or been exposed to the type cats get can have some immunity to this virus. Even some strains of the Adenovirus can give partial immunity. The innate immune system, if not impaired, can protect the majority of people from this virus.

I can understand being cautious of this virus in the beginning, but when evidence unfolded, the CDC and NIH evaluated the risk and started opening the country up....but Democrats want to keep this going and want people to fear so they can get Biden elected. They are twisting things and blaming Trump for everything, it was not Trump who messed up, he was only the voicepiece of the medical agencies that do this kind of evaluating.



posted on Aug, 17 2020 @ 04:03 PM
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originally posted by: Sookiechacha
a reply to: ChaoticOrder

Obviously, we don't have "herd immunity" from the flu, since so many of us get it year after year. We have built up some resistance to previous strains, but those clever viruses are always finding new and innovating ways to make our kind of life forms suffer!

FYI, I haven't gotten a flu shot in decades, and I'm pretty sure, no test, but, I had Covid 19 late last year into early January 2020. So, I have my fingers crossed I have some immunity and hope it doesn't come back on me. However, combined with flu symptoms, there's no telling what Covid 19 might do this fall to the general public.





I would hate to have the flu along with covid. That would suck. I don't get the flu very bad, I did have it a few times in the past and have gained immunity to the initial strains so have pretty good long term immunity and react severely to the vaccines because of that. I may have had covid in February, the symptoms I had did not match covid then, but later on they all fit to make it so I would get tested. It wasn't that bad whatever it was, sort of like a cross between the flu and maybe the lung pain of pleuracy. I would love to get an antigen test. My immunity is usually overreactive, I get over stuff like flu or other viruses in a few days usually, really mild.

Over half the people in this country have immunity that keeps them from getting covid19 if they get the virus. That is why there are so many mild versions and asymptomatic versions of this disease. Innate and T cell immunity can rid the body of this kind of virus....But a person does not know if they have adequate immunity so caution should still be observed, even a mild case can make it so you can pass it to someone else.




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