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what is the GOP covid bill about?

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posted on Aug, 10 2020 @ 04:52 PM
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www.cnbc.com...


Here is what we know about the bill, as Republican leaders release the details:

It would set enhanced federal unemployment insurance at 70% of a worker’s previous wages, replacing the $600 per week which states stopped paying out this week.

The GOP would set the benefit at a sum of $200 per week on top of what recipients would normally receive from states through September, slashing what they got from April through July. In October, the 70% replacement would take effect up to a maximum of $500 per week.

The proposal would send direct payments of $1,200 and $2,400 to individuals and couples, respectively. It would set the same qualifications as the checks approved in March: the payments started to phase out at an average of $75,000 in income per person, and individuals or couples making an average of $99,000 or more did not receive one. It would offer an additional $500 per dependent of any age.

The legislation would shield entities such as businesses, doctors and schools from lawsuits, except for cases of “gross negligence” or “willful misconduct.”

It would set aside $190 billion for Paycheck Protection Program loans. The bill would allow small businesses with fewer than 300 employees that have seen revenue fall by more than 50% to apply for a second round of aid. It would also authorize $100 billion for loans to seasonal businesses and companies in low-income Census tracts that can show revenue reduction of more than 50%.

The bill provides $105 billion to help schools reopen in the fall. Roughly $30 billion of that amount would go to colleges, according to Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Chairman Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn. Most of the money would go to schools physically reopening to help them with the costs associated with safely restarting.

It includes $16 billion to help states boost Covid-19 testing capacity, according to Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby, R-Ala.
Shelby said it would put $26 billion toward the development of Covid-19 vaccines and therapeutics.

The plan includes 100% deductability of business meals, according to Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C.

It includes several tax credits, including an enhanced employee retention credit and a credit for expenses such as upgrades to workplaces and testing that help businesses operate safely.

The bill also authorizes an unrelated $1.75 billion for construction of a new FBI headquarters building in downtown Washington D.C., a short walk from President Donald Trump’s hotel. His company worried plans to demolish the FBI’s current home, the J. Edgar Hoover Building, and move headquarters to the suburbs could allow a competitor hotel to move downtown, according to The Washington Post.


the bold part isn't something I think needs to be in this, that should be a separate bill. But this is what some idiotic leftovers pretend doesn't' exist. the other side. This is what the democrats can't work with. The reduction of the federal money should still help those in dire need, but be little enough to nudge those who can go back to work, to take that step, rather than sit on their can and make more than if they were on the job.

It's a shame our leaders are such children. And it's equally a shame that the MSM manipulates it's base to the degree they can't even be bothered to look into this.




posted on Aug, 11 2020 @ 08:59 AM
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a reply to: network dude

No matter the side there is always pork.



posted on Aug, 11 2020 @ 09:58 AM
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originally posted by: scraedtosleep
a reply to: network dude

No matter the side there is always pork.


Yes, and that is something we need to change. remove pork, make every bill stand on it's own merit, and enact term limits.

Sadly, the one's who we need to enact these changes are the one's who keep voting themselves raises. So not likely. But at a time when the voting public needs help the most, it's possible the pubic will remember who gave it to them, and who kicked the can down the road.



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