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Ceres is an 'ocean world' with sea water beneath surface, mission finds

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posted on Aug, 10 2020 @ 11:34 PM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

Earth is inside the orbit of Neptune.

They say that because Neptune is the most distant planet from the Sun.




posted on Aug, 10 2020 @ 11:36 PM
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NASA released info usid here.a reply to: Phage

another good one


There are many others. A few weeks ago it was on FOX, as the government has it on the books to investigate.

Searches....

psyche 16 worth

psyche 16 mission

psyche 16 gold content

16 psyche mass

psyche 16 location

asteroid psyche 16 composition

psyche 16 price

16 psyche size

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posted on Aug, 10 2020 @ 11:37 PM
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a reply to: charlyv


According to radar observations, the asteroid has been determined to be made up of mostly iron and nickel.


And that's based on density estimates.

Yes, it could well be the core of a failed planet, as the entire asteroid belt is thought to be. But there is not much evidence that it is the result of a collision.
edit on 8/10/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 10 2020 @ 11:40 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Gotcha, with the deletion of Pluto as no longer being a planet all planets inside Neptune are inner orbit planets....cool



posted on Aug, 10 2020 @ 11:40 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: charlyv


According to radar observations, the asteroid has been determined to be made up of mostly iron and nickel.


And that's based on density estimates.


Read the articles. All cores are mostly Iron and Nickel with the heavier metals in there as well. The analysis of this one is spectacular, and listed in my previous links.



posted on Aug, 10 2020 @ 11:41 PM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

Inner planets are generally considered to be those inside Jupiter. The rocky ones.



posted on Aug, 10 2020 @ 11:41 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Thanks BTW



posted on Aug, 10 2020 @ 11:42 PM
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a reply to: charlyv

You provided one other link. Nothing about palladium or gold.

Radar cannot determine chemical composition. It can provide density estimates.

edit on 8/10/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2020 @ 01:30 AM
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a reply to: game over man

There could be a bunch of factors.

The freezing point of water varies with pressure, and is also influenced by the solute content (salt water freezes at much lower temperatures). Currents will inhibit freezing, as would any kind of heated core providing a mechanism for those currents.

Any combination of those would keep salt water liquid.



posted on Aug, 11 2020 @ 07:00 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
Planets?
We don't need no stinkin' planets!

(For the kids, it's a Bogart reference.)


Planets?
Where we're going, we don't need any planets!



posted on Aug, 11 2020 @ 07:52 AM
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Back in 2015 when the Dawn Spacecraft was just getting to Ceres, there were some scientists who speculated about the possibility of liquid water under the surface. It was already pretty well confirmed that there was at least a layer of water ice beneath the crust, but it was also thought it could be possible that the crust may act as an insulator trapping the heat of the core enough to have seas or reservoirs of liquid water as well.

It's good to see evidence helping to confirm that idea of liquid water, but I didn't peruse all the new articles about this enough to see if they speculate why the water is liquid rather than ice. I guess I'll need to keep reading, but great stuff!



originally posted by: Phage
Planets?
We don't need no stinkin' planets!

(For the kids, it's a Bogart reference.)

I though that had something to do with those little groundhog-like animals...
You know -- badgers.


edit on 8/11/2020 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2020 @ 08:09 AM
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originally posted by: projectvxn
a reply to: Phage

I don't know that I'd be surprised. But I do lean on bits of faith more than others. Maybe that ruins it. I would only be surprised to not find life on moons like Enceladus or Europa. Ceres might be a stretch, but who knows, there could be some cold tolerant brine thriving fish living there.


What would their food source be?



posted on Aug, 11 2020 @ 08:13 AM
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More potential amphibious habitats...
Nice find👍
Hypothetically thinking, would amphibious E.T Craft be filled with liquid or just their suits?🤔😉



posted on Aug, 11 2020 @ 08:14 AM
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Perhaps some sea type dwelling flora.
a reply to: HalWesten



posted on Aug, 11 2020 @ 08:28 AM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
....

en.wikipedia.org...(hypothetical_planet)#Other_hypotheses


Phaeton (alternatively Phaethon or Phaëton) was the hypothetical planet theorized by the Titius–Bode law to have existed between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter,


The formation of the Asteroid belt due to this would have had a huge impact on Martian life sustainability.



There is only a tiny bit of material in the asteroid belt and not enough to have been a planet. All of the asteroids in the belt put together would only amount to less than 20% of our Moon's mass.

That is, take a 1/5 chunk of the Moon (or about a 1/200 chuck of Earth), break it up, and that would be all of the stuff in the asteroid belt.

Don't let sci-fi's depiction of a crowded space-boulder field fool you -- the actual average distance between any two asteroid belt objects is about 600,000 miles, or more than twice the distance the earth is to the Moon.

Where is the rest of the material if the asteroid belt really was a destroyed planet? I suppose it's possible that there was an early planetoid there (back when the solar system was made up of a hundred or more similar planetoids) and the materials from those collisions are what eventually formed the planets we have today, but that would have been early in the formation of the solar system; a time when there would have been no Mars or Jupiter (as we know them) for this hypothetical planet Phaeton to have been between.

It seems more likely that the asteroid belt material is the leftover stuff from the formation of the solar system -- stuff that didn't become a planet. Maybe some of that material was once part of larger asteroids and planetoids that collided, but probably not a planet-sized object between Mars and Jupiter.


edit on 8/11/2020 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2020 @ 09:18 AM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

thanks



posted on Aug, 11 2020 @ 09:21 AM
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If only a small percentage of that mentioned 20% of moon mass were not natural...



posted on Aug, 11 2020 @ 09:24 AM
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How many of the Old NASA space shuttles for example to give potential size and technology perspective would equal 1%?



posted on Aug, 11 2020 @ 09:25 AM
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How well can then 1% hide?
Hypothetically speaking. Of course.



posted on Aug, 11 2020 @ 09:31 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Here is a link to a thread I created in 2015.
It covers some of what I am talking about. - For what it is worth.
Much newer info has come out, but the basics are here.

Pallasites, cores/mantles of exploded planets




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