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Bumper Crop of Spookies!

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posted on Aug, 9 2020 @ 05:39 PM
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So this year I am growing some Ghost peppers (spooky...get it? Yeah, yeah, bad, I know) and I've got a bumper crop my first year! YAY!!

I'm also growing some Trinidad Scorpions, but so far my one plant only has one fruit on it, but they say Scorpions take a couple years to really get going. BTW...did you know Scorpion and Ghost peppers are perennials, and not annuals? I didn't. I've got the perfect place to over-winter them, so no worries there.

Anyway, my Ghost plants must have about (45-50) fruit on each plant. They're my babies and I've been watching over them like a hawk all summer, making sure they have just the right amount of water, food and sunlight. Looks like most of mine are going to be yellow, with a few purples. So, tonight was the night to try one to test for hotness.

Now, before I go into the results on the Ghosts, I got some other pepper plants which have been bearing fruit like crazy, but they're not as hot as I had hoped (Scania I think they're called). Plant place said they were supposed to be really hot, but so far the ones I've tried are less than Jalapeno hot (bordering on green pepper-ish), so kind of disappointed. I've had my fingers crossed for the Ghosts.

On to my Ghosts...now for the moment of truth! I clipped the very first pepper from the bush, a demure looking pepper, not as radically puckered as some of the real flamers. Brought the pepper inside and decided to see how it tasted and test it for heat. To begin with I just just a tiny piece off the tip (maybe 1/8"). Flavor was really good, surprisingly actually. Waited a couple minutes...no major heat. Bummer. So I cut a little larger piece off (maybe 1/4"), this time with seeds. Really super nice flavor, very impressive; delightful actually! Chewed it up thoroughly to get every bit of flavor. Then I started feeling the heat, a growing heat. Heat hits on the sides of the tongue first and then builds from there. It was just a very small piece and I was definitely feeling the heat. Nothing to blow me up, but definitely a warning not to pop a whole one of these babies in your mouth, for sure!

If I were to guess, I'd guess these Ghosts are up in the 750,000 to 800,000 Scoville range. Way hotter than the hottest Habanero or Scotch Bonnet I've ever had (I can eat those like candy). There are probably hotter Ghosts out there (i.e. up near 1,000,000,000 Scoville), but I think the yellow variety are a little milder. I can't underscore enough the delicious flavor of these peppers! Really, really, good. Really, really, HOT, but really good!

My original plan was to dry them and then crush them up and put them in a shaker for seasoning. Now, with the delicious flavor, I'm kind of thinking I want to use some of them (at least) in a more fresh state.

So for dinner tonight we're planning on having pasta with some sweet Italian sausage and marina. I think for mine I might cut up some of the rest of that Ghost pepper and sprinkle it over the top of my pasta and sauce!

OH MAN!!

edit on 8/9/2020 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 9 2020 @ 05:55 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Perennial peppers??
What the hell?
I never heard of such a thing...how did you find this out? And are they true perennials or biennials??



posted on Aug, 9 2020 @ 06:11 PM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

Perennials, and some folks have them for 6-7 years (or more). They produce more in years # 2-3, and beyond. They're like a fruit tree.

It was funny actually, how I found out. I watched this video and some guy said they were, so then I did some research (not just "some guy"), because like you, I was pretty surprised, and it seemed to be accepted knowledge among hot pepper aficionados that many of the really hot pepper varieties are actually a bush, and not a annual vegetable plant.

You do have to cut them back, like any perennial, and they don't bear as many fruit in winter, but they still grow if kept above 60F and with proper light.

ETA - You can't leave them outside in winter climates, but if you keep them above 60F and give them enough hours of light every day, they will live. Mine are all potted for this reason (big pots, but still mobile).


edit on 8/9/2020 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2020 @ 06:13 PM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

It says Here that all chilling peppers are perennials .
‘Chilling’ peppers.
Stupid autocorrect.

edit on b000000312020-08-09T18:14:20-05:0006America/ChicagoSun, 09 Aug 2020 18:14:20 -0500600000020 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2020 @ 06:23 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Boof that pepper and prove you're a real man.



posted on Aug, 9 2020 @ 06:27 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Aaahhh....OK...they are tender perennials???
Viable in Florida and Texas, but annuals in Green Bay, Wisconsin....



posted on Aug, 9 2020 @ 06:28 PM
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a reply to: butcherguy

I can see doing that!
My father used to overwinter geraniums.....kept them on the second floor near a window...watered very little....almost like suspended animation. Had the same plants for years.



posted on Aug, 9 2020 @ 06:30 PM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe
My grandmother did that with her geraniums also.



posted on Aug, 9 2020 @ 07:03 PM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

Yeah, pretty much.

But I guess they qualify, especially if you want more peppers because 1st year Scorpions don't really produce, and if my plants are evidence, this is true. They only produced enough fruit so I'd know they were Scorpions. However, I do see some more buds now, so we can hope.



posted on Aug, 9 2020 @ 07:23 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Naw...I really like really hot peppers, but I respect them. Blowing myself up on a super-pepper isn't fun...for a couple days!

I honestly enjoy the flavors of some of the super-peppers, but they have to be used with caution and moderation. Otherwise, everyone who tries one just says..."NEVER AGAIN", and while this might be fun once, you'll never get repeat customers...or friends!



posted on Aug, 9 2020 @ 09:40 PM
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Pity your poor butthole. Yikes.
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk




posted on Aug, 9 2020 @ 10:52 PM
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Do you know how to make cheese by any chance?

I really like Habanero Jack, so I assume Ghost Pepper cheese would be a hit. Extra sharp white cheddar is my favorite and I think a spicy version would be really good. However, with the way flavors blend, it might come out better with a muenster, provolone, some type of "butter cheese".

I like to put a good bit of crushed red pepper on cheese and melt it over whatever.

Dry some and crush it for cheese! Ghost cream cheese on an everything bagel.
edit on 9-8-2020 by FlyingSquirrel because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 10 2020 @ 03:40 AM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Naw...I really like really hot peppers, but I respect them. Blowing myself up on a super-pepper isn't fun...for a couple days!

I honestly enjoy the flavors of some of the super-peppers, but they have to be used with caution and moderation. Otherwise, everyone who tries one just says..."NEVER AGAIN", and while this might be fun once, you'll never get repeat customers...or friends!





You may well appreciate this...



posted on Aug, 10 2020 @ 09:42 AM
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You making any hot jam, man? Pickle some of those bad boys too. Pickled hot jam. Sounds amazing. You should get on that. Send me some



posted on Aug, 10 2020 @ 09:55 AM
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I didn't know they were perennials either. Might have to bring one in the house this year and try it.

I have Ghost, Trinidad scorpions and Carolina reapers all growing this year, along with my normal cayenne and regular green peppers. I always add cayenne to the corn when I can it, gives it a nice little kick.

Ghost gets added to a few jars of salsa when canning, but this year I'm going to do a jar with each, Trinidad and Reaper. I won't be trying it, but hubby and son will.



posted on Aug, 10 2020 @ 10:47 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

I read somewhere that growing peppers in poor soil makes them hotter. I'm not sure how true that is.

Make sure you wash your hands immediately after handling them. You don't want to rub your eyes or pee without doing so.



posted on Sep, 23 2020 @ 01:59 PM
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I wish I could get hotter peppers to grow up in WA, but best I can do is a few good jalapeno plants, and sometimes serrano, but I tried a habanero this year and it never produced a single pepper.

But anything perrenial and I'm interested, will look into this for next season




posted on Sep, 23 2020 @ 02:13 PM
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a reply to: Aliquandro

Look into using grow lights, you should be able to get them to continue to fruit after having been outside by hand pollinating them.



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