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Applying for the Police (UK)

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posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 06:59 AM
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For a while now I’ve yearned for a career change. I’ve spent the last 7 years working in the environmental business and I’ve reached what I believe to be the zenith of my time here.

For a short while, perhaps the past few years, I’ve wondered about joining the police force. I adore the city I live in and have long desired to make a difference in some way, to make things better. I’ve always respected our emergency services, having required their assistance on occasion in the past, and it struck me that they make real tangible differences to people’s lives, the kind I’d like to make.

Usually it has never been the right time – if I were to be successful in becoming an officer, it’d be at least an £8k reduction in salary, and with a new born I couldn’t work out financially how I’d manage

Well, the right time has now presented itself. I enquire regularly with the hiring division of my local force and yesterday received an email that they’re opening for new applicants. Financially it’d still be a big hit, but I think I could make it work.

But above all else, I think I possess at least some of the qualities necesary to make a good officer. I believe I’m patient, compassionate, I’ve always been a confident communicator, I can empathise without it clouding my judgement. I’m not by any means an athlete, but I maintain an acceptable level of fitness. I know there’s a lot I don’t know, a lot to learn, but I’m willing. I’ve recently turned 27, and feel as though it’s now or never.

So here’s my question for the ATS community, especially those who currently serve or who have previously served on the force – What was your experience? What advice would you have for someone considering joining the force? Do I even possess the skills necessary to hack it? What are, say, the top 5 qualities a person should possess to be a good police officer, in your opinion? Any wisdom you could impart would be appreciated.

I’d like to hear from anyone anywhere in the world, too – I’m sure the majority of skills a person requires transfer internationally, though I’m certain that the challenges some countries face differ to what I’d expect here in Britain (i.e. the ever looming risk in America of a firearm coming into play is not an equal risk here in the UK).

I thank you in advance.




posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 07:25 AM
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Sounds to me like this is something you want, so I say go after it before it is to late.
I had same dream as you once, but I keep postponing it..
I have much respect for the people that choose to serve as police force, they are the hand of the law and the keepers of peace.



posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 07:40 AM
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a reply to: DeusInAbsentia
What's wrong about your job?
Why is it the zenith of your time there?



posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 07:55 AM
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I took a hit to follow my passion. In the long run I am happier and now back to where I was b4. It just took hard work.

Follow your dreams or you will never be happy.



posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 07:56 AM
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Yes, go for it if that's what you want.

My brother in law served as a police officer for a bit. He had a difficult time dealing with the lowest scum of the world though.

You'll have to develop a thick skin; but don't lose your humanity.



posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 07:56 AM
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UK COPWATCH

www.youtube.com...

Were you bullied or were you a bully at school?

Do you beat your wife/children/animals?





edit on 6-8-2020 by acrux because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 08:04 AM
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a reply to: acrux
WOW....That was mighty douchey of you. You do understand that there are bad AND good people in the world right?



posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 08:19 AM
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a reply to: Trueman

It has become significanty less rewarding, and where before I felt I was making a difference in at least some small part, that has long gone. The company is stagnating thanks to Covid, to a point where redundancies are taking place.

It feels as though if I were to make a move to the police, I should do it now.

a reply to: Spacespider
a reply to: theatreboy

thank you both for the responses



posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 08:30 AM
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The timing of this - age 27...new baby...taking a high risk job that pays less...

So how does your significant other feel about you trading a job that typically has regular working hours for a job where new hires typically get the worst shifts (nights and weekends)? You said that you have a child...how does your partner feel about you leaving a relatively safe career field for one which will put your life in danger and possibly leave your partner to raise your child without you? a reply to: DeusInAbsentia



posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 08:35 AM
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a reply to: acrux

Seems as though you've already decided the content of my character, so I won't address those questions.


No one is here to defend poor policing, so if you were trying to make a point, well... you haven't.



posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 08:47 AM
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a reply to: Buvvy

It's a good point, and the questions you've asked are something I've considered myself. I have spoken with my partner about this on a few occassions, and other than the concerns around money, she's supportive. She's far more of a realist than I, so if anyone were to call me out on this it'd be her.

Having said that, let's say 6 months down the line I were a successful applicant, she might change her mind. It's certainly not a decision I'm making alone, and of course the stability of my immediate family comes first.

I'm at the point right now where I either do this or I don't - the peope on ATS have a wide breadth of experience and wisdom, so I thought I'd get some collective feedback too.
edit on 6-8-2020 by DeusInAbsentia because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 08:52 AM
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a reply to: paraphi

Thanks for the post. Your brother-in-law, did he end up making a career out of it, or did he decide to move onto something else? You also say he had a difficult time dealing with certain people - do you think this was something he managed to adjust to?



posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 09:24 AM
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a reply to: DeusInAbsentia

If you do join I wish you all the best and hope that all officers get a pay rise to deal with the scum they do on a daily basis, good luck and stay safe and sane



posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 09:52 AM
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a reply to: DeusInAbsentia

Back in the 80's to join Lancashire constabulary it was a huge dossier about 80 to a hundred pages thick, by the late 90's it was only about 20 pages.
Basically back ground check's, education, health, social background and also affiliations etc.

In London the Met are currently prosecuting a police officer whom joined there force without telling them he had been either a former of still active member of National Action a proscribed organisation that is banned as a neo Nazi organization under anti terror legislation, he apparently also had an obscene image or two of some kid so they are better rid of that one.

These day's the Majority of British Police forces are less corrupt than they were at other time's in the past but still far from perfect but if you join it can be a hard working but rewarding career, however I have known of officers particularly in more corrupt decades whom were willing to quit the police having become jaded, some that stayed on but had lost any real respect for the majority of there colleagues etc.

It's a Job, it's a career but they are still human being's with all the same flaw's, character trait's and tendency's of any other job, you shall meet people you will respect and even love and others whom you can not stomach.

I wish you the very best with your application and hope it is for a force you will enjoy working for.

BTP is an interesting one, there wages are or used to be set at national salary level's so they were usually paid about the same as an officer in London but are of course a national police force spanning the whole of the UK's transport (mostly train's etc) network (not motorways or road's though that is the local constabulary's remit).

Best background for the job can vary, they want people from all walk's of life and with a wide range of skill's so being former RMP does not necessarily stand anyone in better stead than for example being a former CNC operator.


Best of luck and I hope you enjoy it and find it rewarding, I hope you end up with GOOD, Honest colleagues (like any job there are still a few arseholes in the police).
edit on 6-8-2020 by LABTECH767 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 09:54 AM
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a reply to: DeusInAbsentia

I say go for it. But the lengthiness of your op...well intented for sure...to me shows you are trying to convince us and perhaps yourself!

Therein...I see your answer. Good luck, God bless.

1st Responder/EMT
I.C.S. CERT-Dept of Homeland Sec/FEMA
Region 2 South
(Retired 2020)



posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 09:57 AM
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originally posted by: paraphi
Yes, go for it if that's what you want.

My brother in law served as a police officer for a bit. He had a difficult time dealing with the lowest scum of the world though.

You'll have to develop a thick skin; but don't lose your humanity.


It is front line, police are the first one's called to any incident and in the UK most of the time it is more like being a social worker than a police officer, neighbour dispute's, this neighbour has thrown there dog much over into that neighbour's garden or has stolen there plant's (Seeing this from the victims point of view my mother suffered that when some travellers were housed next to her and put her through hell) and when it is not something basic like that it can get pretty harsh, dealing with violent offences, knife crime on the rise, having to quell potentially dangerous situations, crowd control and of course hunting the worst of the worst and being front line between violent offenders and the general public - and in these day's being a target yourself for terrorists, hateful mob's etc.



posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 09:58 AM
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P.S. 35 years old, I went and made Oakland County Sheriff's Dept, and Air Force Reserves.

Follow your heart brother...just do it for the right reasons...peace. MS



posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 10:01 AM
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originally posted by: LABTECH767

originally posted by: paraphi
Yes, go for it if that's what you want.

My brother in law served as a police officer for a bit. He had a difficult time dealing with the lowest scum of the world though.

You'll have to develop a thick skin; but don't lose your humanity.


It is front line, police are the first one's called to any incident and in the UK most of the time it is more like being a social worker than a police officer, neighbour dispute's, this neighbour has thrown there dog much over into that neighbour's garden or has stolen there plant's (Seeing this from the victims point of view my mother suffered that when some travellers were housed next to her and put her through hell) and when it is not something basic like that it can get pretty harsh, dealing with violent offences, knife crime on the rise, having to quell potentially dangerous situations, crowd control and of course hunting the worst of the worst and being front line between violent offenders and the general public - and in these day's being a target yourself for terrorists, hateful mob's etc.


Hey Lab-I think he's prob aware of the cons...because he doesn't mention them.

Quite telling...in itself



posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 10:46 AM
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originally posted by: DeusInAbsentia
Thanks for the post. Your brother-in-law, did he end up making a career out of it, or did he decide to move onto something else? ...


He did a three of years after training. He went into policing for the best intentions and enjoyed it quite a bit of it. Unfortunately, being on the front-line of society means you are exposed to some really horrible people and situations, and that took a toll on him. Policing involves spending a lot of time dealing with difficult and complex people and that can be an emotional drain.

I really support the police because they have to get involved in things which most people would run a mile from. If you make a career out of it and do some good, then that's thumbs up from me. Even if you try to make it work and it fails, then at least you can say that you tried.

Many people just snipe from the side-lines at the police (acrux, yes you), but would cry like a girl if they were exposed to what a police officer has to deal with in a "normal" day.



posted on Aug, 6 2020 @ 10:54 AM
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Jesus they are absolute filth in the majority.

They spend their time punishing people for meaningless offences and taking their money for the pleasure.

I couldn't think of a worse job to go into.

You won't be helping people.

You'll be surrounded by bearded apeths with huge chips on their flabby shoulders. Know it all bullies with problems at home and problems from when they were at school.

Yes I've met some good coppers. But they are in the minority.

Plus they're over worked and underpaid.
edit on 6-8-2020 by and14263 because: (no reason given)



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