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Beautiful pics: Comet Neowise taken in NH and a breathtaking Saturn shot from Hubble

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posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 07:33 PM
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Here are two recent pictures taken from different sources.

The first is a picture of Saturn that was recently shot by Hubble. The level of detail and the subtle colors are astonishing!

The second is a photo of Comet Neowise taken from the Kancamangus Highway in the White Mountains of NH. I've driven that highway many times and it's always beautiful in that mountain range, but add in Neowise and it becomes spectacular!

BTW - I thought the only good views of Neowise were going to be found in more southern places, but what do I know?

Enjoy!


Here's Saturn:



And here's Neowise:





posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 07:35 PM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

I was never able to get a good look at Neowise and that annoys me a ton, thank goodness so many great pictures were taken.



posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 07:36 PM
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a reply to: Riffrafter




but add in Neowise and it becomes spectacular!

With quite a bit of post-processing. It should be noted. It doesn't look like that to the naked eye.
Very beautiful, all the same.



posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 07:49 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Very true.
The best view I got of it was at 4:30 am just before the sun started coming up, while on the highway headed to work.

It was very bright that morning.
It looked like a rip in the early morning sky.



posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 07:51 PM
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a reply to: Macenroe82

You poet, you.



posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 08:08 PM
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originally posted by: Macenroe82
a reply to: Phage

Very true.
The best view I got of it was at 4:30 am just before the sun started coming up, while on the highway headed to work.

It was very bright that morning.
It looked like a rip in the early morning sky.


Lucky man!

Where was this?



posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 08:39 PM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

I live in Pittsburgh Pennsylvania. I could not see Neowise with the naked eye. But I made a few adjustments to my ISO and varied exposure to 3 5 and as long as 30 seconds. Once i dialed in where to point... it was cake.

First up is my favorite one. I got the international Space station to the top, Neowise and a Boeing 717 on approach to Pittsburgh International Airport at 9:40 pm.



Here's Southwest Airlines long exposure with Neowise.


Here are the few of 300+ I took over 3 night's

edit on 3-8-2020 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 08:50 PM
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My friend mark lives down in Shenandoah valley. He has a way better camera and was willing to drive darn near everywhere he could to get a good shot.
off his IG.



posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 08:51 PM
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a reply to: Bigburgh

That's nice.
No post processing?



posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 09:03 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Bigburgh

That's nice.
No post processing?


No, i don't have a program or the knowhow to post process. They are done only with the camera, raw if you will. ATS won't let me upload the originals from this tablet due to size. I had to screenshot my own Instagram and present here to ATS. The quality doesn't cut it. As for Mark, I do know he does post edit.

Edit: he also has a Bluetooth, hence being able to take a pic of himself and comet Neowise.

edit on 3-8-2020 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 09:06 PM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

No stars behind Saturn.

Thousands of stars behind comet Neowise.

Seems like it should be OPPOSITE.



posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 09:36 PM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

2 hours North of Thunder Bay Ontario, headed to the mine site I work at.

Very remote location.
No cell phone coverage after being in the highway for 15 minutes.
The only days you see vehicle in the road are early Tuesday mornings, or Monday afternoons.
Both days are shift change.



posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 09:47 PM
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a reply to: carewemust
Start here:
How many degrees of view does each image cover?

edit on 8/3/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 11:18 PM
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originally posted by: carewemust
a reply to: Riffrafter

No stars behind Saturn.

Thousands of stars behind comet Neowise.

Seems like it should be OPPOSITE.


Ah, the good old "why no stars" debate...
Saturn is a huge planet lit by the Sun, easily visible to the naked eye. They had to use a fairly short exposure to take a picture of it, hence no stars.
Neowise is much fainter and requires a long expsure.



posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 11:22 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Yes i understand not seeing just right left up down from a tight prospective.

Off subject but it made me think of this.

Damn, paywall
www.nationalgeographic.com...

"Apr 24, 2015 · In 1995, astronomer Bob Williams wanted to point the Hubble Space Telescope at a patch of sky filled with absolutely nothing ... ( Robert Williams and the Hubble Deep Field Team (STScI) and NASA)."

Scientists pointed Hubble at a dead spot that light is not seen. Much like i was told to look below the Big Dipper for Neowise. With the right optics you can achieve your goal. Still I did not see with my naked eye, but it was there.

Music is calming...



I would like to state that I thought Hubble was directed at a point in space and the shutter was left open for a month. I must be mistaken as i can't find nothing but the 100 hours capture.



posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 11:23 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: carewemust
Start here:
How many degrees of view does each image cover?


Which instrument is better with depth/distance? I saw a Hubble image with something like 1,000 stars and galaxies per square inch.



posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 11:24 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace

originally posted by: carewemust
a reply to: Riffrafter

No stars behind Saturn.

Thousands of stars behind comet Neowise.

Seems like it should be OPPOSITE.


Ah, the good old "why no stars" debate...
Saturn is a huge planet lit by the Sun, easily visible to the naked eye. They had to use a fairly short exposure to take a picture of it, hence no stars.
Neowise is much fainter and requires a long expsure.

That's weird. I see a lot of stars immediately when I look up at the sky. That's a short exposure isn't it?



posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 11:31 PM
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a reply to: Bigburgh
WOW! That video left me mind-blown.

From what I've read, we could travel as fast as what's depicted by that animation our entire life, we'd die of old age still passing through galaxies.


edit on 8/3/2020 by carewemust because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 11:32 PM
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a reply to: carewemust




I saw a Hubble image with something like 1,000 stars and galaxies per square inch.

How many stars do you see right next to Saturn when you look at it in the sky? Do you even know where Saturn is?

How long was the Hubble deep field exposure? I'll tell you. It took four months to get it. You cannot see much of anything that is in that image, no matter how good your eyes are.


edit on 8/3/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2020 @ 11:33 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: carewemust




I saw a Hubble image with something like 1,000 stars and galaxies per square inch.

How many stars do you see right next to Saturn when you look at it in the sky? How long was the Hubble deep field exposure? I'll tell you. It took four months to get it. You cannot see much of anything that is in that image.

Bigburgh has explained it nicely. No more questions.

Hubble is AMAZING. Months' long exposure with no blur, even though everything is moving!
edit on 8/3/2020 by carewemust because: (no reason given)



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