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A firearm safety dilemna... help

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posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 02:00 AM
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a reply to: madmac5150

Buy a gun safe and only you have the key.
edit on 2-8-2020 by CharlesT because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 03:09 AM
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originally posted by: madmac5150

originally posted by: DictionaryOfExcuses
a reply to: madmac5150

It seems that you're beyond discussion on this issue, so I'm asking to satisfy my own curiosity: does your stepson have a hypersensitive fight/flight response?


In a heated situation, he would shoot before thinking.

He wouldn't consider the consequences of pulling the trigger...

ETA: To directly answer your question... yes. We had a coyote on the property last year, and he freaked out. He left our birds alone with a predator, only to run inside and tell me to shoot it. So... yeah.


Hi Mac,

Could that incident have made him realize that he needs to get familiar with a gun?

The first thing he did was to come and get the responsible adult with a firearm.

Maybe I'm reading it wrong.

If it was me, I would allow it on a trial basis.

The firearm to be under your control.

Firearm safety drills and general training ad nauseum.

Make him earn the right and you will have bonded with him as well.



posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 03:36 AM
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I may be wrong but I believe in some States you can get a psychiatrist to determine an individual should not have a gun. This may require a diagnosis of a mental illness. That would go on his record and keep him from getting a permit.



posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 04:00 AM
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How has he gone with the pellet gut? Done anything stupid with it? That he came to you first instead of getting his gun for the coyote is a good thing.

Does he get picked on in his local community? It does come for those having challenges at times. I can understand an overreaction to this if he is armed.

How close is this BLM, defund the police madness to where you live? If things do happen to get hot one day would you want another set of hands to help defend your home?

It sure is a tough one. Will keeping the gun in a locked safe that he cannot access alone be enough to give him some security with all the Hollywood nightmares? Can this level of security be maintained?



posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 07:17 AM
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If he absolutely will not budge on the need for a firearm, try talking him into a blackpowder rifle. Much slower to use, he may just calm down a bit before using it in a way that could cause harm.

Or if he does bring home a non-blackpowder weapon, pull the firing mechanism out. Wether it's a sear or pin, you can always file them down to render it inoperable while looking functional.

And there is always martial arts schools he could check out. Maybe a little calm and clarity would benefit him more than thinking he needs to be armed.
Let's face it, it's much more badass to be able to disarm someone with a weapon, than it is to pull one on somebody.

Best of luck to you.
edit on 2-8-2020 by Notoneofyou because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 07:49 AM
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originally posted by: madmac5150

originally posted by: one4all

originally posted by: madmac5150
My stepson is 28 years old, and has Asperger's... a form of autism. Intellectually, he is high functioning. He is a smart kid... but he is essentially a 13 year old. He has been living here for the last 3 years, so I know his disability first hand.

He recently came into some money... a small inheritance from his grand-father.

He wants to buy a gun.

There is nothing on his record, to prohibit him from buying a firearm. He has no criminal record. He has no history of violence.

My gut, however... tells me that it is a very bad idea. Seriously.

My wife is in total agreement. The best we can come up with, is to forbid him from carrying anywhere on our property, or in our vehicles.

I would love to figure out a way to explain to him, that he isn't completely capable of making life or death decisions. Carrying any firearm assumes that level of responsibility.

If any of you guys have any ideas... I'd love to hear them...


You said he was high functioning right? Introduce him to a Co-Ed Archery Club.


His problem isn't a lack of instruction. His problem is that he truly believes Hollywood... THAT, is what scares the hell out of me. Like any teenager, he thinks if he straps on a gun he is both invincible, and infallible.



Hes a human being...a Male....he wants to be something more....its normal....I said CoEd Club....give him something he will like more than guns......just saying.



posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 08:06 AM
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originally posted by: Cmajlz
I may be wrong but I believe in some States you can get a psychiatrist to determine an individual should not have a gun. This may require a diagnosis of a mental illness. That would go on his record and keep him from getting a permit.


It's his son. If he were to do that, it would be detrimental to their relationship. Possibly even causing the very thing Mac is trying to prevent.

Sounds to me like the boy just needs confidence and some guidance to realize he doesnt need a weapon to be safe / to keep his loved ones safe.



posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 08:13 AM
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a reply to: madmac5150

Shoot him in the foot so he understands how dangerous guns can be.



posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 08:22 AM
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a reply to: madmac5150

Safety instructor...you are so biased that I can smell it through the screen. Only you know the best right?
You are important, the only one with gun.
Does he believe that some people are vampires from Blade? Or he wants to be like someone? People believe in weird things all the time. Crazy people have guns, evil kids have them, women carry them🙂
His rights should not be infringed. He didnt shoot someone or himself with the pellet gun - that's a better score than me



posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 08:56 AM
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a reply to: madmac5150

Go ahead. Get him one. AR-15s are bad-ass. What could go wrong?






posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 09:01 AM
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a reply to: madmac5150

No long guns... No simi-auto long guns especially... No riot shotguns...

A revolver or maybe a 22 target pistol...



posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 09:51 AM
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What a stupid situation.

He clearly shouldn't have access to a gun, any system that grants him access to one is clearly broken.



posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 09:55 AM
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a reply to: madmac5150

Gotta redirect that desire.

My suggestion is take him to jiu jitsu classes. It's martial arts for intelligent people.

Intelligent people need a physical out too.



posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 09:58 AM
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a reply to: wheresthebody

What the OP should do is have his son legally adjudicated as mentally ill. That way he will never be able to purchase a firearm legally.



posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 09:59 AM
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a reply to: projectvxn

That sounds like the right path, lets hope the system works.



posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 10:01 AM
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a reply to: wheresthebody

It would, at least in theory, bar him on the 4473. Should he lie about it the background check will ping him. But adjudication is required before any of that can happen.



posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 10:03 AM
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This situation has 'bad ju-ju' written all over it! I feel for you, brother.

I'm not sure I have a better suggestion than what you're already doing. The tough part of this is, he is of age, and the more you keep him from getting one the more he's going to want one. If you don't do it with him, he might go get one on his own which is almost even worse.

Maybe one solution might be to go with him to get something, and then he only gets to use it when under your supervision. Otherwise it is kept locked in a safe, or secured with a gun lock. This way he can get what he wants, but you can control the situation. Definitely something in the low capacity, single action, category though, like a revolver.

ETA - Another thought...has he ever fired a real firearm? Firearms are a lot louder than most new shooter's expect. What I'm going to say next is not a good idea on a long term basis, but is there any chance you might be able to get him to fire a firearm without hearing protection once or twice just so he understands just how loud they really are. The sound alone may deter him, especially if his desire to get one is based on TV shows, movies and video games.


edit on 8/2/2020 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 10:11 AM
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originally posted by: projectvxn
a reply to: wheresthebody

What the OP should do is have his son legally adjudicated as mentally ill. That way he will never be able to purchase a firearm legally.


Simple and done.



posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 10:48 AM
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a reply to: madmac5150
Before you do anything enroll him in a firearm safety course.



posted on Aug, 2 2020 @ 10:54 AM
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a reply to: Skid Mark

He's mentally ill. He needs to be barred from firearm ownership. Especially considering the description of his son's mental faculties and ability to make life and death decisions.

This isn't going to be addressed by a safety class. It will only get addressed by telling the hard truth and making the tough decisions and being honest with ourselves about what it means to give a gun to a mentally ill person who can't make sound decisions.

He needs to be adjudicated and prevented from ever owning a firearm.




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