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Enhanced by AI , Moon Landing Footage like You've Never Seen

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posted on Jul, 19 2020 @ 01:02 PM
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Take a ride on the Lunar Rover as it traverses the Moon in 60fps restored footage.
The clarity of the restored images and frame rate make it look like it was filmed yesterday.

A photo and film restoration specialist, who goes by the name of DutchSteamMachine, has worked some AI magic to enhance original Apollo film, creating strikingly clear and vivid video clips and images.

"I really wanted to provide an experience on this old footage that has not been seen before," he told Universe Today.

Take a look at this enhanced footage from an Apollo 16 lunar rover traverse with Charlie Duke and John Young, where the footage that was originally shot with 12 frames per second (FPS) has been increased to 60 FPS:
www.sciencealert.com...




Apollo 15 landing at 60fps.


Hats off to Dutchsteammachine , great job.
www.youtube.com...


edit on 19-7-2020 by gortex because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 19 2020 @ 01:30 PM
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a reply to: gortex

You make this site great again, great thread my friend





posted on Jul, 19 2020 @ 02:17 PM
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originally posted by: UpIsNowDown
a reply to: gortex

You make this site great again, great thread my friend




This is exactly the type stuff that brought me to ATS



posted on Jul, 19 2020 @ 02:23 PM
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Can we please get a round of applause for Gortex? Amazing!



posted on Jul, 19 2020 @ 02:44 PM
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Really cool . Strange you can't see any stars in the sky . Seems like they would be crystal clear .



posted on Jul, 19 2020 @ 02:52 PM
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a reply to: TREESNAKE1111

I think it's due to the brightness of the Moon.



posted on Jul, 19 2020 @ 02:56 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Yeah , if they pointed the camera up it would probably be pretty clear .



posted on Jul, 19 2020 @ 03:38 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Great find! Thanks for sharing!



posted on Jul, 19 2020 @ 04:26 PM
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great videos.



posted on Jul, 19 2020 @ 04:45 PM
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Why cant I get the last episode of Space Force series 1 out of my head...



posted on Jul, 20 2020 @ 02:04 AM
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It's the aperture...thats why you never see stars. To film on a bright surface you need to reduce the amount of incoming light using the aperture. Now stars are distant dim light compared to the moon being all light colored and sunlit. So to tame the light you dim it too much to see the stars dim light.



posted on Jul, 20 2020 @ 03:13 AM
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a reply to: TREESNAKE1111

As pointed out by others it's because the moon is very bright and the camera is set for filming the moon, not the sunlit sky.

Also, this is 16mm film footage, not photographic film. I've only seen Jupiter in one short sequence of Apollo 16mm footage (Apollo 12) and that was from lunar orbit. Apollo did take many images of stars, but they were either using film and lenses capable of doing the job or in conditions where they would show up.

edit on 20/7/2020 by OneBigMonkeyToo because: clarification



posted on Jul, 20 2020 @ 08:13 AM
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How was the rover footage originally transmitted to earth?
It couldn't have been transmitted live, due to the rovers erratic motion?

The documentary "American Moon", asks these questions, here:



www.youtube.com...

Skip to 1:40:30
edit on 20/7/2020 by kloejen because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 20 2020 @ 09:25 AM
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a reply to: kloejen

It wasn't.

The footage you're seeing there is 16mm footage, not the live TV broadcasts. Apollo 15 and 17 did do brief transmissions but the vibrations were too much.

The kind of minor vibrations from the astronauts loading and unloading equipment would not have had much of an impact given the broad broadcast cone being transmitted to the big receiving dishes on Earth.



posted on Jul, 20 2020 @ 11:05 AM
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a reply to: gortex

Is this real-time?

Considering he is on a different planet, in a life-suit, less gravity and the terrain itself, the speed he is doing seems fast. Have to give the operator extra credit for that!



posted on Jul, 20 2020 @ 12:03 PM
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Very cool! a reply to: gortex



posted on Jul, 20 2020 @ 12:33 PM
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a reply to: gortex

This was fascinating. Thanks for posting this. Looking for the day I can do some VR driving on the moon. I hope I live long enough for the VR technology to make it feel like the real thing.



posted on Jul, 20 2020 @ 12:50 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Nice OP Gortex!

Thanks very much for your work in this area. Perhaps you are the best one for this subject we have in my years reading your posts on ATS.



posted on Jul, 20 2020 @ 12:57 PM
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So .... are any of those "controversial" pictures included in this?



posted on Jul, 20 2020 @ 03:59 PM
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a reply to: AaarghZombies

No but a famous object that is either a rock or something very different to a rock most certainly is.
This object.

files.abovetopsecret.com...
files.abovetopsecret.com...
Second video about 14 second's in.



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