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Ultra-black fish that absorb 99.95% of light found in the deep ocean

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posted on Jul, 18 2020 @ 11:05 AM
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Wasn't sure where to put this. But this is pretty cool. Recently 16 species of ultra-black deep sea fish were discovered. Some of these species reflect as little as 0.05% light, nearly on par with vantablack

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In the darkness of the deep sea, where sunlight can barely reach, a single photon of light can blow an animal's cover.

Scientists have now discovered at least 16 species of ultra-black fish, each equipped with specialised skin that allows them to evade detection while hunting or hiding in the dark.

Absorbing 99.95 percent of all photons, this blacker-than-black exterior creates a cloak of invisibility against the ocean's dim backdrop.

Even under a harsh spotlight, these creatures appear as mere silhouettes.

All of these creatures had an ultra-black exterior that reflected less than 0.6 percent of available light, and 16 species reflected less than 0.5 percent. What's more, this ultra-black skin was found across the body, and in the near-complete darkness of the deep, this cloak of darkness probably evolved to absorb bioluminescent light, emitted from prey or predators

This low reflectance puts deep-sea fishes on par with the blackest known animals," the authors write, "surpassing the darkness of ultra-black butterflies (0.06%–0.5% reflectance) and equaling the blackest birds of paradise (0.05%–0.31% reflectance)."

In fact, the black skin of these fish is nearly on par with Vantablack, which absorbs 99.96 percent of light





Now I personally find this part to be really cool


In one species, this ultra-black skin was actually found around the gut, and this might be used to hide the glow of a recent bioluminescent snack.

Effectively what they've done is make a super-efficient, super-thin light trap," Osborn explains.

"Light doesn't bounce back; light doesn't go through. It just goes into this layer, and it's gone."


From the article, it seems like these ultra dark light absorbing fish may actually be fairly common and the simple method they use is something we may be able to adapt into some sort of useful technology.


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And I have to say, they're pretty amazing looking. I'd love to see what they actually look like in person.










posted on Jul, 18 2020 @ 11:10 AM
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S&f...but they look evil. Just saying...



posted on Jul, 18 2020 @ 11:19 AM
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a reply to: theatreboy
I mean yeah, they kinda look like horrifying nightmare fuel. The kind of thing you wake up to in the middle of the night as you hear a soft slithering in your room and nothing but a quick glance of shadow against shadow moving until you turn your head and see that row of teeth gleaming at you out of the darkness as it smiles and opens its mouth revealing a gaping chasm of darkess.

edit on 18/7/2020 by dug88 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 18 2020 @ 11:43 AM
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a reply to: dug88

Light is essential for life. They adapted to keep as much light as possible. Photosynthesis.

Great thread



posted on Jul, 18 2020 @ 11:45 AM
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originally posted by: dug88
a reply to: theatreboy
I mean yeah, they kinda look like horrifying nightmare fuel. The kind of thing you wake up to in the middle of the night as you hear a soft slithering in your room and nothing but a quick glance of shadow against shadow moving until you turn your head and see that row of teeth gleaming at you out of the darkness as it smiles and opens its mouth revealing a gaping chasm of darkess.


^LOLLOLOL

Seriously, they are way cool. Can't imagine how amazing they are when light just disappears on them. Too neat! Thanks for posting it



posted on Jul, 18 2020 @ 11:49 AM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

wiki


Definition of photosynthesis. : synthesis of chemical compounds with the aid of radiant energy and especially light especially : formation of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and a source of hydrogen (such as water) in the chlorophyll-containing cells (as of green plants) exposed to light


google


Why is light important to animals?
The energy from the sun is transferred from plants to animals when animals eat the plants. Animals also benefit from the sun's effect on their bodies, because sunlight on skin produces vitamin D, which is important in the formation of strong bones. Animals also get vitamin D by eating plants.



posted on Jul, 18 2020 @ 12:32 PM
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I like the one with the super pointy teeth! I see a Halloweeen costume or cool puppet. The kind that is on a stick.



posted on Jul, 18 2020 @ 01:00 PM
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I feel like I've seen these before. Just saying Still cool though.



posted on Jul, 18 2020 @ 01:07 PM
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a reply to: dug88

Cool post


I had to look up ultra-black butterflies. Here's an article on them (beautiful!)
www.sciencealert.com...



posted on Jul, 18 2020 @ 01:28 PM
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a reply to: zosimov

Oh wow those are really beautiful. Here, i'll throw in a few pics of those to make up for the nightmare fish.







posted on Jul, 18 2020 @ 02:02 PM
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a reply to: dug88

Vanta fish,Master of darkness!

Strangely,vantablack the synthetic stuff which is supposedly as black as possible is close to 99.95% absorbant of light.
I guess that is the maximum possible due to the constraints of physics or something?

en.wikipedia.org...

I wonder if these fish have some way of identifying members of the same species-infra red vision maybe?
cool thread,the deep sea is like an alien world.



posted on Jul, 18 2020 @ 02:24 PM
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Very cool, so much yet to find down there. Nature is so freaking amazing, I hope we don't ruin it any further.

S&F



posted on Jul, 19 2020 @ 06:15 AM
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so if there are fish that can visually disappear for prey in the ocean, can there be land based animals/pre human inhabitants that can't be seen?
like in the national parks?
*cough * disappearing humans *cough *



posted on Jul, 19 2020 @ 06:25 AM
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a reply to: anticitizen

I mean it's pretty easy to disappear when you live in a world of darkness.

Here on dry land it's a different matter. You can't reliably go invisible by absorbing all light, and you certainly can't go about it by reflecting all light.

There are way's to do it, but not in any convenient manner.



posted on Jul, 19 2020 @ 03:43 PM
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a reply to: AutomateThis1

i think it would be sufficient if a lifeform with the brainpower between higher apes and humans has the ability to merge colourwise with the background as octopuses and others already do.



posted on Jul, 20 2020 @ 09:43 AM
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Far from being any kind of scientist and, knowing this is a really dumb observation, here goes anyway! When I saw "absorption/absence of light" my thoughts went immediately to black holes. Yes, I know black holes have something to do with gravity and refraction, etc. Just thought it was interesting to note the similar descriptions.



posted on Jul, 20 2020 @ 10:27 PM
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originally posted by: anticitizen
a reply to: AutomateThis1

i think it would be sufficient if a lifeform with the brainpower between higher apes and humans has the ability to merge colourwise with the background as octopuses and others already do.


Oh.. haha. That totally slipped my mind. I was still thinking about the manipulation of light as a means to camouflage.

I mean there are animals that can do that. That's more of genetic and physiological thing though.

I'd wager chameleons aren't as intelligent as octopuses and squid, but both can change their color appearance.

There are difference between the two as well as to how their systems work.

With cephalopods like squid and octopuses their camouflage is dynamic. Chameleons utilize passive camouflage. Chameleons merely reflect whatever color they happen to be near. Octopuses can change their color and pattern at will.

So, I would say that ability is more of a physiological thing.

Even if humans went through gene therapy to activate or introduce those genes, we'd still lack the physiological makeup to utilize the ability. Mammals only have melanocytes for coloration. Fish and amphibians have chromatophores which have a more varied coloration and can aborb and reflect light. Certain species have iridophores, which unlike chromatophores that only get brighter or darker, can also change colors.

Chameleons change color by releasing hormones in response to stimuli. The hormones circulate through the body and take a few seconds to finish.

Octopuses on the other hand actively change their color and sometimes even texture, by will. Their neurons activate which achieve the desired affect in fractions of a second. That why you can see them pulse and strobe.

A chameleon can't do that

And it's entirely possible, in fact I'd say it's certain, that there are animals that we haven't discovered that can utilize camouflage. Bugs especially.
edit on 2072020 by AutomateThis1 because: (no reason given)

edit on 2072020 by AutomateThis1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2020 @ 12:29 AM
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a reply to: AutomateThis1

Bird mite spores are 0.5 mm (or less) big and just by kicking their legs (frog or scissor kicking) can “fly” (and flock around). In daylight, you normally do not see them. And they don’t mess with you.

But when desperate, any mammal will do. And that is where you end up in hell!

Hundreds of unseen entities biting your face in the middle of the night while you sleep, crawling in your mouth, in your ears,... really gross! And that make you sneeze, dry heave, and, at the end, have diarrhea!! That is how they spread their eggs and procreate.

If you see a bird sneeze... run!!!

Never go barefoot on the lawn!

And if you blow your nose one morning see blood... welll, it will not be fun!

That is one I know of that you should avoid at all costs!!!

That “vanta black” fish looks scary!

What about inter dimensional beings???

Heck. The Greys freak me out as is!!


edit on 21-7-2020 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: This getting dumb! Let me type what I type and stop second guessing me!! Stoopid smartphone!



posted on Jul, 22 2020 @ 01:55 PM
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a reply to: AutomateThis1
appreciate your scientific input

wonder what animals with "superpowers" are still out there yet to be discovered.



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