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Pentagon refuses to comment on new UAP leak

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posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 08:53 AM
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a reply to: Spacespider

This




posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 10:01 AM
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originally posted by: Rancidmilk2go
whatever it was...you can see the missle launched at 1:50 has zero effect on the object !!!!


Can a missile hit more than one target? One after the other... In mid air?

I mean, wouldn't the fins or nose cone or something get destroyed on first contact? It even flies off after hitting the first two objects.

But it does look neat. Reminds me of a eyewitness encounter that mentioned what looked like molten metal falling from a ufo.



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 10:20 AM
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a reply to: ByteChanger

Im not sure but it isnt an illusion because the missile changes trajectory. It definately hit the UAP.

Theoretically...it would seek out its next target if it just flew through the first. But they objects are clearly spaced out in almost a perfect line because the missile doesnt even manuever. It accidently hits the second one.



I could see these being flares up until the end where they fly away. Not to sound nutty...It almost looks like someting imitating flares.

Obvouisly the base was on alert and the story behind the video details these as unexplained.



battlerattle.marinecorpstimes.com...
edit on 17-7-2020 by Rancidmilk2go because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 10:49 AM
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a reply to: LtFluffyCakes96

Because they would rather just call them flares without watching the end where they fly away
edit on 17-7-2020 by Rancidmilk2go because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 10:58 AM
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originally posted by: Krahzeef_Ukhar

originally posted by: AutomateThis1
As far as the objects remaining stationary, what it looks like to me is that the missile flew past both of them without fragmenting and the speed as it was going past blew off some of the molten material, but not enough to extinguish or push it out of the way.


Is the idea that they are shooting at balloons held up by flares a silly idea?

Not the flares that we see.
Perhaps from the other 2 that we see that don't get attacked.

If these parachute flares are dripping magnesium then you probably want to avoid that with a missile.


That's what I'm wondering. Where's the balloons? And if it were training why is the cameraman looking around when they drop like he's searching for them. Doesn't seem right that if it's a training mission he'd look for them in that manner. I mean you have an idea of what's going on if you're on a training mission one would think.



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 10:59 AM
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I think some footage is missing. At the start of the video the timer in the bottom right corner reads 21:25 and 21:39 when the video ends. That's 14 mins., however, the video length is 10:39.

What's in those 3m21s that we don't see?

Hope the maths is right.



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 11:05 AM
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a reply to: Encia22

According to the poster...

The guy was recording a screen on a CROWS system.

So he may not have had his camera. Thats probably enough time to go crab your camera
edit on 17-7-2020 by Rancidmilk2go because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 11:06 AM
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originally posted by: Rancidmilk2go
a reply to: LtFluffyCakes96

Because they would rather just call them flares without watching the end where they fly away


Could you please give a timestamp when the objects fly off sideways?



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 11:09 AM
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originally posted by: Kreeate

originally posted by: Rancidmilk2go
a reply to: LtFluffyCakes96

Because they would rather just call them flares without watching the end where they fly away


Could you please give a timestamp when the objects fly off sideways?




Watch the whole video and stop moving the goalposts
you see it at the end. That last 2 minutes
edit on 17-7-2020 by Rancidmilk2go because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 11:12 AM
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originally posted by: Rancidmilk2go

originally posted by: Kreeate

originally posted by: Rancidmilk2go
a reply to: LtFluffyCakes96

Because they would rather just call them flares without watching the end where they fly away


Could you please give a timestamp when the objects fly off sideways?


Stop being lazy

Watch the whole video and stop moving the goalposts


Go look at my earlier posts in this thread again and then tell me who's actually lazy?

I watched the video several times and I don't see this movement you claim to see, therefore I requested a timestamp?



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 11:14 AM
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originally posted by: Rancidmilk2go
a reply to: LtFluffyCakes96

Because they would rather just call them flares without watching the end where they fly away


Now, back that comment up with the time they start to fly away.

I cant see that anywhere on the video..

Here's the video

edit on 17/7/20 by SecretKnowledge because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 11:29 AM
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I suspect that the people who see the objects fly away mean this :

It starts at around 10:31 in the video.


To me, that's just the camera tracking.
edit on 17-7-2020 by Kreeate because: typo



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 11:36 AM
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originally posted by: Encia22
I think some footage is missing. At the start of the video the timer in the bottom right corner reads 21:25 and 21:39 when the video ends. That's 14 mins., however, the video length is 10:39.

What's in those 3m21s that we don't see?

Hope the maths is right.


Ok, my bad.

I just studied it again and the video appears to have been sped up. An actual minute equates to 1:24 in the camera timer in the corner.



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 11:49 AM
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a reply to: Flesh699
The balloons wouldn't be hot so they are invisible.

Maybe it's helium balloons getting hit and then explode and become visible?

I'm grasping at straws.



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 11:52 AM
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originally posted by: ByteChanger
Can a missile hit more than one target? One after the other... In mid air?


If the pentagon has figured it out, should they be explaining it to everybody?



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 11:54 AM
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originally posted by: AutomateThis1
a reply to: Kreeate

It is interesting. Normally, when an AIM9 Sidewinder gets near it's target it actually explodes and fragments. The fragmentation offers greater hit capacity and less chances of missing than if the missile were just to impact into the aircraft.

In your video capture you can see the object, which may or may not be a missile, hit the first object(which may or may not be a flare[which are often used in training exercises which deal with target acquisition equipment.]) then, go just under the second one.

It doesn't look like the missile is exploding or fragmenting, as you can see it fly on past the second flare. Which makes sense if it's just an inert missile used for training.

In my experienced and well trained eyes. It really does look like flares.

The flares have parachutes which you can see in the video. The parachutes allow the flares to stay airborne longer, and if the wind carries them they can travel further. The parachutes absorb the heat, thus displaying a heat signature.

There are illumination rounds that are bigger in general, provide for longer range, and have brighter illumination.

Flares are made of material than burns and the intensity of that burn causes molten material to drop off, which is what is most likely the stuff "dripping" off of the bottom.


As far as the objects remaining stationary, what it looks like to me is that the missile flew past both of them without fragmenting and the speed as it was going past blew off some of the molten material, but not enough to extinguish or push it out of the way.


Best explanation so far!



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 12:00 PM
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a reply to: CraftyArrow
Not close enough!
Definitely the best though.

The flares we are looking at were never touched.



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 12:41 PM
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a reply to: Krahzeef_Ukhar

Vids down.

Hope someone made a copy



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: Krahzeef_Ukhar

The missile also changed trajectory



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 12:56 PM
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This looks like a training missile from a Stinger launcher targeting flares at night. That's why it doesnt explode and immediately goes for the next one after "hitting" the first. You can clearly see them slowly working their way towards the ground. Now if one happened to just shoot off into Neverland thatd change my mind, sorry dude just flares and music.

They do look sinister in a scifi sort of way in the IR mode



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