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Pentagon refuses to comment on new UAP leak

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posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 02:53 AM
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I made a GIF of the "impact".



Could it be a heat seeking capability test with a missile that is not "explosive"? Shot at some special purpose flares?
I don't have enough knowledge about military procedures to make an educated guess, so I'm spitballing.

If it was an A-10 and not a missile, why would the pilot fly into the lights?


edit on 17-7-2020 by Kreeate because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 03:05 AM
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edit on 1772020 by AutomateThis1 because: (no reason given)
Don't know what happened.

But yeah, looks like a sidewinder. I'd say it was probably a training exercise.
edit on 1772020 by AutomateThis1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 03:26 AM
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a reply to: Kreeate

A-10s carry sidewinders.



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 03:57 AM
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originally posted by: AutomateThis1
a reply to: Kreeate

A-10s carry sidewinders.


The only thing that really baffles me is that those objects remain stationary, even after being hit. No idea how that's possible.



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 04:11 AM
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a reply to: Kreeate

It is interesting. Normally, when an AIM9 Sidewinder gets near it's target it actually explodes and fragments. The fragmentation offers greater hit capacity and less chances of missing than if the missile were just to impact into the aircraft.

In your video capture you can see the object, which may or may not be a missile, hit the first object(which may or may not be a flare[which are often used in training exercises which deal with target acquisition equipment.]) then, go just under the second one.

It doesn't look like the missile is exploding or fragmenting, as you can see it fly on past the second flare. Which makes sense if it's just an inert missile used for training.

In my experienced and well trained eyes. It really does look like flares.

The flares have parachutes which you can see in the video. The parachutes allow the flares to stay airborne longer, and if the wind carries them they can travel further. The parachutes absorb the heat, thus displaying a heat signature.

There are illumination rounds that are bigger in general, provide for longer range, and have brighter illumination.

Flares are made of material than burns and the intensity of that burn causes molten material to drop off, which is what is most likely the stuff "dripping" off of the bottom.


As far as the objects remaining stationary, what it looks like to me is that the missile flew past both of them without fragmenting and the speed as it was going past blew off some of the molten material, but not enough to extinguish or push it out of the way.
edit on 1772020 by AutomateThis1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 04:43 AM
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originally posted by: IMSAM

originally posted by: Rancidmilk2go

"Pentagon has neither confirmed or denied this video is authentic. We waited 2 month's "




Source for that?




Where is the pentagon source?



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 06:19 AM
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magnesium flares tied to a ballon was my first thought..

Until it a missile failed to knock it down.. and in the end of the video where the objects are making left to right at impossible speeds.


cool video.



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 06:22 AM
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originally posted by: SecretKnowledge
a reply to: Rancidmilk2go

From the youtube uploader

"A-10 Warthog makes contact at 1:53"

Look like flares, whats that crap dripping from them? Is that the way flares act?

I searched for "parachute flares as seen through a FLIR" but go no results

Yes.
On IR



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 06:33 AM
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a reply to: AutomateThis1

can you please post a video that shows parachute flares with this kind of behaviour, thanks.



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 07:12 AM
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originally posted by: Kreeate

originally posted by: AutomateThis1
a reply to: Kreeate

A-10s carry sidewinders.


The only thing that really baffles me is that those objects remain stationary, even after being hit. No idea how that's possible.


Maybe a science based member can answer this................. If a sidewinder missile hit some UAP made from plasma would it have a destructive impact or would it just pass through with no damage?



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 07:18 AM
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a reply to: Kreeate
Nice work!!!!

Look close at the one on the left it doesn't seem to get hit. It's like something behind it or in front of it got hit.

This is just a cool angle I think, the first hit looks awesome but the second one is a little off.



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 07:23 AM
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originally posted by: Kreeate

originally posted by: AutomateThis1
a reply to: Kreeate

A-10s carry sidewinders.


The only thing that really baffles me is that those objects remain stationary, even after being hit. No idea how that's possible.

Yeah that's the part that really has me scratching my head. I would think that at any speed, an object suspended by chutes being hit would be significantly disturbed.



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 07:25 AM
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originally posted by: ufoorbhunter

originally posted by: Kreeate

originally posted by: AutomateThis1
a reply to: Kreeate

A-10s carry sidewinders.


The only thing that really baffles me is that those objects remain stationary, even after being hit. No idea how that's possible.


Maybe a science based member can answer this................. If a sidewinder missile hit some UAP made from plasma would it have a destructive impact or would it just pass through with no damage?


I'm not that guy, but...

Yes it would leave damage.
Which means the obvious answer is that they were not hit.

This is the equivalent to a movie punch.
Another angle and it wouldn't look as cool.



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 07:47 AM
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a reply to: Krahzeef_Ukhar

Top one for the advice mate and clearing that one up. Was just considering if the lights were plasma based UAP or not. Looks like we can discount those types



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 07:57 AM
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a reply to: ufoorbhunter
I don't know my ass from my elbow.

My uneducated guess is that it's a jet going past 4 markers and either dropping fuel or flares or bombs or miscellaneous at each of those markers.

It would be less impressive if we saw all 4 incidents I think.



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 08:03 AM
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For what it's worth... an image showing the trajectory.



Green straight line was added just to get an offset of the red trajectory.
edit on 17-7-2020 by Kreeate because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 08:06 AM
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originally posted by: Krahzeef_Ukhar
a reply to: ufoorbhunter
I don't know my ass from my elbow.

My uneducated guess is that it's a jet going past 4 markers and either dropping fuel or flares or bombs or miscellaneous at each of those markers.

It would be less impressive if we saw all 4 incidents I think.



Ya know more than me mate, school wouldn't even let me take science as was deemed too simple



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 08:08 AM
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a reply to: Kreeate

It does appear to take an upwards lift as illustrated in your diagram



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 08:11 AM
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At one point you can't see the vertical position after the projectile disturbance of the heat signature. Not an expert on flares, seen lots in the military but (assuming) it moves some but recovers so fast human eye can't detect it.

What would help are R&D vids of flares. They study them in the elements and their integrity with projectiles. I firmly believe if we had access to those and a subject matter expert on flares explaining it in laymens terms it would make sense. It would also showcase we have some damn good scientists and engineers and they made some bad ass flares.



posted on Jul, 17 2020 @ 08:18 AM
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originally posted by: AutomateThis1
As far as the objects remaining stationary, what it looks like to me is that the missile flew past both of them without fragmenting and the speed as it was going past blew off some of the molten material, but not enough to extinguish or push it out of the way.


Is the idea that they are shooting at balloons held up by flares a silly idea?

Not the flares that we see.
Perhaps from the other 2 that we see that don't get attacked.

If these parachute flares are dripping magnesium then you probably want to avoid that with a missile.
edit on 17-7-2020 by Krahzeef_Ukhar because: Editing is fun







 
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