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I live life and believe in a Lord of the whole.

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posted on Jul, 15 2020 @ 03:22 AM
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You don't control whether you live or die, God does.
edit on 15-7-2020 by Out6of9Balance because: Spelling




posted on Jul, 15 2020 @ 07:02 AM
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originally posted by: SaturnFX
...
Love in the heart is key, be it from religion, a ideal, etc. Everyone needs something like that, be it a religious person finding something bigger than themselves, an atheist inspired by a vision from wise people, etc.

Love “rejoices with the truth.” Love identifies true Christians, who rejoice with the truth, speak the truth, and consider whatever things are true, despite living in a world full of falsehood and unrighteousness.​—1Co 13:6; Php 4:8. This kind of love prevents us from telling lies as well or from being so easily deceived by false stories as those who prefer having their ears tickled with falsehoods or false stories (those who 'love the darkness rather than the light', see quotation further below).

“But know this, that in the last days critical times hard to deal with will be here. For men will be lovers of themselves, lovers of money, boastful, haughty, blasphemers, disobedient to parents, unthankful, disloyal, having no natural affection, not open to any agreement, slanderers, without self-control, fierce, without love of goodness, betrayers, headstrong, puffed up with pride, lovers of pleasures rather than lovers of God, having an appearance of godliness but proving false to its power; and from these turn away. From among these arise men who slyly work their way into households and captivate weak women loaded down with sins, led by various desires, always learning and yet never able to come to an accurate knowledge of truth.” (2 Timothy 3:1-7)

“For there will be a period of time when they will not put up with the wholesome* [Or “healthful; beneficial.”] teaching, but according to their own desires, they will surround themselves with teachers to have their ears tickled.* [Or “to tell them what they want to hear.”] They will turn away from listening to the truth and give attention to false stories.” (2 Timothy 4:3,4)

“Now this is the basis for judgment: that the light has come into the world, but men* [Or “people.”] have loved the darkness rather than the light, for their works were wicked. For whoever practices vile things hates the light and does not come to the light, so that his works may not be reproved.* [Or “exposed.”] But whoever does what is true comes to the light, so that his works may be made manifest as having been done in harmony with God.”

Job 24:13:

There are those who rebel against light;

They do not recognize its ways,

And they do not follow its paths.


Isaiah 5:20,21:

Woe to those who say that good is bad and bad is good,

Those who substitute darkness for light and light for darkness,

Those who put bitter for sweet and sweet for bitter!

Woe to those wise in their own eyes

And discreet in their own sight!


originally posted by: SaturnFX
...
If religion however makes you miserable, or makes you a terrible person to others, then its a garbage belief system you picked up.

“The one who says that he is in the light and yet hates his brother is still in the darkness.” (1 John 2:9) That explains the behaviour of many in Christendom, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, etc. towards others.

“When religion is not encouraging strife it is acting as a drug which numbs the human conscience and fills the human brain with escapist fantasies. . . . [It] causes human beings to be narrow, superstitious, full of hatred and fear.” The former Methodist missionary who wrote that added: “These charges are true. There is bad and good religion.”​—Start Your Own Religion.

The facts of history show that to a large extent, religion​—defined as “the service and worship of God or the supernatural”—​has a shocking record. It should enlighten and inspire us. More often than not, however, what it does is engender strife, intolerance, and hatred. Why is that?

According to the Bible, there is a very simple answer. Posing as “an angel of light,” Satan the Devil has misled millions into following his teachings rather than God’s. (2 Corinthians 11:14) The apostle John showed that Satan’s influence is so extensive that “the whole world is lying in the power of the wicked one.” (1 John 5:19) John knew that Satan was “misleading the entire inhabited earth.”​—Revelation 12:9.

What have been the consequences of this? Satan has promoted religious systems that on the surface appear to be holy. They have “a façade of ‘religion,’” but their true condition is exposed by the evil fruitage they produce. (2 Timothy 3:5, J. B. Phillips; Matthew 7:15-20) Instead of helping to solve mankind’s problems, religion actually becomes part of the problem.

Remember, the very nature of deception is that the one being deceived is unaware of it. The apostle Paul gave an example of this when he wrote: “The things which the nations sacrifice they sacrifice to demons, and not to God.” (1 Corinthians 10:20) Those people would likely have been shocked to think that they were worshiping demons. They thought that they were worshiping a good god, or gods, of some kind. Yet, in reality they had been deceived by “wicked spirit forces in the heavenly places,” who support Satan in his efforts to mislead mankind.​—Ephesians 6:12.

Let's consider, for example, how Satan managed to deceive and mislead many professed Christians who chose to ignore the apostle John’s warning about that evil influence.​—1 Corinthians 10:12.

What Jesus taught came from God:

“What I teach,” said Jesus Christ, “is not mine, but belongs to him that sent me.” (John 7:16) Yes, what he taught was from Almighty God. So Jesus’ teachings had a powerful, uplifting effect on those who listened to him. They did not ‘numb the human conscience or fill the human brain with escapist fantasies.’ On the contrary, Jesus’ teachings set people free from religious error and human philosophies produced by a world that was “in darkness mentally” because of the Devil’s deception.​—Ephesians 4:18; Matthew 15:14; John 8:31, 32.

True Christians were identified, not by a mere profession of piety, but by a faith that reflected the beautiful qualities produced by God’s holy spirit. (Galatians 5:22, 23; James 1:22; 2:26) Outstanding among these qualities​—and the identifying mark of genuine Christianity—​is the sublime quality of love.​—John 13:34, 35.

Note this crucial point, however: Neither Jesus nor his apostles expected the Christian congregation to continue in the form in which it was originally established. They knew that apostasy would develop and that the true religion would be overshadowed for a time.

In an illustration about wheat and weeds, Jesus foretold that true religion would be virtually obscured for a time. Read the account for yourself at Matthew 13:24-30, 36-43. Jesus sowed a field with wheat, “the fine seed,” which pictured his faithful disciples who would make up the original Christian congregation. He warned that “an enemy,” Satan the Devil, would in time oversow the wheat field with “weeds”​—people who professed to follow Jesus Christ but who in fact rejected his teachings.

Very soon after the death of Jesus’ apostles, individuals appeared who proved to be “weeds,” favoring twisted human teachings over “the very word of Jehovah.” (Jeremiah 8:8, 9; Acts 20:29, 30) As a consequence, a perverted, counterfeit Christianity appeared on the world stage. It was dominated by what the Bible calls “the lawless one”​—a corrupt clergy class that was itself steeped in “every unrighteous deception.” (2 Thessalonians 2:6-10) Jesus foretold that this situation would change “in the conclusion of the system of things.” The wheatlike Christians would be collected together in unity and “the weeds” would eventually be destroyed.

It is this counterfeit Christianity that bears responsibility for the “centuries of unredeemed barbarism” and spiritual darkness that enveloped Christendom in the centuries that followed. Foreseeing this and all the other depraved and violent acts done since then in the name of religion, the apostle Peter rightly predicted that “on account of these [professed Christians] the way of the truth [would] be spoken of abusively.”​—2 Peter 2:1, 2.

It certainly is not just Christendom that has given religion a poor reputation. Think of the fundamentalist versions of “militant piety,” for example, that former nun Karen Armstrong says have been spawned by “every major religious tradition.” According to Armstrong, one crucial test of any religion is that it should lead to “practical compassion.” What has been the record of fundamentalist religions in this regard? “Fundamentalist faith,” she writes, “be it Jewish, Christian, or Muslim, fails this crucial test if it becomes a theology of rage and hatred.” (The Battle for God​—Fundamentalism in Judaism, Christianity and Islam) But is it only the “fundamentalist” brand of religion that has failed this test and become “a theology of rage and hatred”? History shows otherwise.

Satan has, in fact, built up a world empire of false religion, identified by rage, hatred, and almost endless bloodshed. The Bible calls this empire “Babylon the Great, the mother . . . of the disgusting things of the earth,” and it is pictured as a prostitute who rides on the back of a beastlike political system. It is noteworthy that she is held accountable for “the blood . . . of all those who have been slaughtered on the earth.”​—Revelation 17:4-6; 18:24.

History proves, however, that not everyone has been deceived. Even in the darkest of times, notes Melvyn Bragg, “many fine souls did good when most around them were evil.” Genuine Christians continued to “worship [God] with spirit and truth.” (John 4:21-24) They stood apart from a worldwide religious system that had prostituted itself as “a reinforcer of military power.” They refused to be drawn into a working relationship of Church and State that history reveals as “more a pact made by Satan than any Jesus of Nazareth.”​—Two Thousand Years—​The Second Millennium: From Medieval Christendom to Global Christianity.

Song 141 Searching for Friends of Peace (with lyrics)



posted on Jul, 15 2020 @ 07:33 AM
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originally posted by: Out6of9Balance
a reply to: TzarChasm

It's an honor addressing your ignorance, you are not in control here.


It's becoming pretty obvious that no one is.



posted on Jul, 15 2020 @ 07:36 AM
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originally posted by: whereislogic
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History proves, however, that not everyone has been deceived. Even in the darkest of times, notes Melvyn Bragg, “many fine souls did good when most around them were evil.” Genuine Christians continued to “worship [God] with spirit and truth.” (John 4:21-24) They stood apart from a worldwide religious system that had prostituted itself as “a reinforcer of military power.” They refused to be drawn into a working relationship of Church and State that history reveals as “more a pact made by Satan than any Jesus of Nazareth.”​—Two Thousand Years—​The Second Millennium: From Medieval Christendom to Global Christianity.

“For though we walk in the flesh, we do not wage warfare* [“We do not wage warfare.” Lit., “we are not doing military service.” Lat., non . . . mi·li·ta'mus.] according to what we are in the flesh. For the weapons of our warfare are not fleshly, but powerful by God for overturning strongly entrenched things. For we are overturning reasonings and every lofty thing raised up against the knowledge of God.”—2 CORINTHIANS 10:3-5

More details in my latest commentary in these threads (direct links to my commentary):

How do Christians justify their taking the mark of the beast already?

Wanted: Honest intelligent productive thinking to resolve the issue God exists or not.

Uh-oh! No good will come from this...

Silent No Longer (see also subsequent pages)

Who will be the next pope? Your views, please.
edit on 15-7-2020 by whereislogic because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2020 @ 08:35 PM
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originally posted by: whereislogic

originally posted by: SaturnFX
...
Love in the heart is key, be it from religion, a ideal, etc. Everyone needs something like that, be it a religious person finding something bigger than themselves, an atheist inspired by a vision from wise people, etc.

Love “rejoices with the truth.” Love identifies true Christians,.............

----2 hours later---

........enuine Christians continued to “worship [God] with spirit and truth.” (John 4:21-24) They stood apart from a worldwide religious system that had prostituted itself as “a reinforcer of military power.” They refused to be drawn into a working relationship of Church and State that history reveals as “more a pact made by Satan than any Jesus of Nazareth.”​—Two Thousand Years—​The Second Millennium: From Medieval Christendom to Global Christianity.



So...umm...you like love too? Cool.

I am not that crazy about the bible...its a bit dated. Should have been written for a more timeless appeal. I prefer quotes from LOTRs, however Star Wars has some memorable quotes also and the message translates better as it ages.



posted on Jul, 15 2020 @ 08:36 PM
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originally posted by: Out6of9Balance
You don't control whether you live or die, God does.


Lots of suicide cases would beg to differ.



posted on Jul, 16 2020 @ 12:21 AM
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a reply to: SaturnFX

No, God is The Most High.
edit on 16-7-2020 by Out6of9Balance because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 16 2020 @ 03:14 AM
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originally posted by: Out6of9Balance
a reply to: SaturnFX

No, God is The Most High.

Which?



posted on Jul, 16 2020 @ 04:19 AM
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a reply to: SaturnFX

The Most High. You know, that which you are not.
edit on 16-7-2020 by Out6of9Balance because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 16 2020 @ 10:45 AM
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originally posted by: SaturnFX

So...umm...you like love too? Cool.

As indicated by my first Bible quotation, not every type of love is the good kind. It speaks about those who love themselves and love money, and lists those attributes amongst things like being “without love of goodness”. I also quoted a text that describes those who 'love the darkness rather than the light', which would include those who have a preference for false stories over “beneficial teaching” and “the truth”* as described at 2 Timothy 4:3,4 (see footnote).

*: “All Scripture is inspired of God and beneficial for teaching, for reproving, for setting things straight,* [Or “correcting.”] for disciplining in righteousness, so that the man of God may be fully competent, completely equipped for every good work.” (2 Timothy 3:16,17)

God’s Word says: “The fear of* [Or “reverence for.”] Jehovah means the hating of bad. Self-exaltation and pride and the bad way and the perverse mouth I have hated.”​—Pr 8:13.

People, no doubt, become more aware of the evils of wrongdoing when the act, little or big, is committed against themselves. Then it hurts. The pain becomes real. When we hear of the bad done in the world​—the lying, the frauds, the brutality and killings—​it helps us to get the right viewpoint if we realize that we or our loved ones might have been the victims. And if a person feels tempted to do wrong, he does well to ask himself how he would feel if that same wrong were committed against himself or members of his family.

Such an approach will cause one to understand and appreciate better why God commands: “O you lovers of Jehovah, hate what is bad.” Also why the apostle Paul urged: “Abhor what is wicked.” And why the psalmist said: “I have hated every false path. Falsehood I have hated, and I do keep detesting it.” (Ps. 97:10; Rom. 12:9; Ps. 119:104, 163) Do you feel as the apostle and the psalmist did about badness? Do you hate what is bad? Do you hate “falsehood” and “false stories”? (2 Tim. 4:3,4)

Just like with love, there are wrong and right kinds of hatred. This word “hate” has several shades of meaning. It may denote intense hostility, sustained ill will often accompanied by malice, that impels one to bring harm to the hated object. This is a wrong kind of hatred. It has a bad motive. It is born of the Devil, often is nurtured in a confused and frustrated mind, and is invariably misdirected. The whole history of men and nations under the Devil’s control has been practically a continuous account of violent bloodspilling hatred (see links to the commentary in my previous comment). Sometimes only a few individuals are involved. At other times anarchy and revolution engulf a whole nation. Frequently the hatred bred by international wars blots out the lives of thousands of innocent ones.

“Hate” may also signify a strong dislike, but without any intent to bring harm to the object, seeking instead to avoid it as when one loathes something distasteful. This kind of hate is good if directed against that which is bad.

This right kind of hatred is in imitation of Jehovah, the God of righteousness. He does not hate what is bad because of frustration nor does he manifest his hate in uncontrolled, intemperate, violent actions. God’s hatred of what is bad is a principled hatred. Such hatred does not disturb one’s peace of mind and afflict one with ulcers. It is a strong dislike, an extreme aversion, a pronounced distaste, a profound repugnance of what is bad. It means to loathe, to abhor, to abominate whatever is bad because it is wrong, very harmful and wholly unloving.​—Prov. 6:16-19.

So as the apostle Paul encourages: “Let your love be without hypocrisy. Abhor what is wicked; cling to what is good.” (Rom. 12:9)

What Makes Us Good or Evil? (Awake!—2010)

...
Good or Evil​—The Choice Is Yours
...

Goodness (Insight on the Scriptures)
edit on 16-7-2020 by whereislogic because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 16 2020 @ 12:09 PM
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originally posted by: Out6of9Balance
a reply to: SaturnFX

The Most High. You know, that which you are not.

If I must appreciate a deity, I would rather choose one that walks not above me, but with me.

But you keep on with your emperor god idea...just not really my cup of tea. Too hierarchal. got the head, then the ones close, the mid managment level, etc...seems like a pyramid scheme but without even the chance to move up.



posted on Jul, 16 2020 @ 12:11 PM
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originally posted by: whereislogic

originally posted by: SaturnFX

So...umm...you like love too? Cool.

As indicated by my first Bible quotation, not every type of love is the good kind. It speaks about those who love themselves and love money, and lists those attributes amongst things like being “without love of goodness”. I also quoted a text that describes those who 'love the darkness rather than the light', which would include those who have a preference for false stories over “beneficial teaching” and “the truth”* as described at 2 Timothy 4:3,4 (see footnote).

*: “All Scripture is inspired of God and beneficial for teaching, for reproving, for setting things straight,* [Or “correcting.”] for disciplining in righteousness, so that the man of God may be fully competent, completely equipped for every good work.” (2 Timothy 3:16,17)

God’s Word says: “The fear of* [Or “reverence for.”] Jehovah means the hating of bad. Self-exaltation and pride and the bad way and the perverse mouth I have hated.”​—Pr 8:13.

People, no doubt, become more aware of the evils of wrongdoing when the act, little or big, is committed against themselves. Then it hurts. The pain becomes real. When we hear of the bad done in the world​—the lying, the frauds, the brutality and killings—​it helps us to get the right viewpoint if we realize that we or our loved ones might have been the victims. And if a person feels tempted to do wrong, he does well to ask himself how he would feel if that same wrong were committed against himself or members of his family.

Such an approach will cause one to understand and appreciate better why God commands: “O you lovers of Jehovah, hate what is bad.” Also why the apostle Paul urged: “Abhor what is wicked.” And why the psalmist said: “I have hated every false path. Falsehood I have hated, and I do keep detesting it.” (Ps. 97:10; Rom. 12:9; Ps. 119:104, 163) Do you feel as the apostle and the psalmist did about badness? Do you hate what is bad? Do you hate “falsehood” and “false stories”? (2 Tim. 4:3,4)

Just like with love, there are wrong and right kinds of hatred. This word “hate” has several shades of meaning. It may denote intense hostility, sustained ill will often accompanied by malice, that impels one to bring harm to the hated object. This is a wrong kind of hatred. It has a bad motive. It is born of the Devil, often is nurtured in a confused and frustrated mind, and is invariably misdirected. The whole history of men and nations under the Devil’s control has been practically a continuous account of violent bloodspilling hatred (see links to the commentary in my previous comment). Sometimes only a few individuals are involved. At other times anarchy and revolution engulf a whole nation. Frequently the hatred bred by international wars blots out the lives of thousands of innocent ones.

“Hate” may also signify a strong dislike, but without any intent to bring harm to the object, seeking instead to avoid it as when one loathes something distasteful. This kind of hate is good if directed against that which is bad.

This right kind of hatred is in imitation of Jehovah, the God of righteousness. He does not hate what is bad because of frustration nor does he manifest his hate in uncontrolled, intemperate, violent actions. God’s hatred of what is bad is a principled hatred. Such hatred does not disturb one’s peace of mind and afflict one with ulcers. It is a strong dislike, an extreme aversion, a pronounced distaste, a profound repugnance of what is bad. It means to loathe, to abhor, to abominate whatever is bad because it is wrong, very harmful and wholly unloving.​—Prov. 6:16-19.

So as the apostle Paul encourages: “Let your love be without hypocrisy. Abhor what is wicked; cling to what is good.” (Rom. 12:9)

What Makes Us Good or Evil? (Awake!—2010)

...
Good or Evil​—The Choice Is Yours
...

Goodness (Insight on the Scriptures)


Hmm

"Fire and wind come from the sky, from the gods of the sky, but Crom is your god. Crom, and he lives in the Earth. Once giants lived in the Earth, Conan, and in the darkness of chaos they fooled Crom, and they took from him the enigma of steel. Crom was angered, and the Earth shook, and fire and wind struck down these giants, and threw their bodies into the waters. But in their rage, the gods forgot the secret of steel, and left it on the battlefield. We, who found it, are just men: not gods, not giants, just men. And the secret of steel has always carried with it a mystery. You must learn its riddle, Conan, you must learn its discipline. For no one, no one in this world can you trust. Not men, not women, not beasts... This you can trust " - Father of Conan the Barbarian
edit on 16-7-2020 by SaturnFX because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 16 2020 @ 12:16 PM
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a reply to: SaturnFX

You'll never be God, that's for sure.



posted on Jul, 16 2020 @ 04:32 PM
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originally posted by: Out6of9Balance
a reply to: SaturnFX

You'll never be God, that's for sure.

Seems like too much pressure. I would rather just be true to myself.



posted on Jul, 16 2020 @ 04:42 PM
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originally posted by: Out6of9Balance
a reply to: SaturnFX

You'll never be God, that's for sure.


Is this about God or about how cool you are for being one of his followers?



posted on Jul, 16 2020 @ 06:08 PM
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a reply to: TzarChasm

How you honestly even missed that. Not impressive at all.



posted on Jul, 16 2020 @ 10:23 PM
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originally posted by: SaturnFX

originally posted by: Out6of9Balance
a reply to: SaturnFX

You'll never be God, that's for sure.

Seems like too much pressure. I would rather just be true to myself.

In order to analyze yourself, one would do well to occasionally ask themselves the question: “Who am I?”

An identity is an inner sense that tells you who you are and what you stand for. Armed with that knowledge, you’re empowered to say no to trouble​—to control your life instead of letting others control it for you. How can you develop such confidence? Answering the following questions is a good start.

1 WHAT ARE MY STRENGTHS?

Why it matters:
Knowing your abilities and positive traits will boost your confidence.

Consider: Everyone has various gifts. For example, some people are talented in art or music, while others are athletically inclined.

Bible example: The apostle Paul wrote: “Even if I am unskilled in speech, I certainly am not in knowledge.” (2 Corinthians 11:6) With his thorough grasp of the Scriptures, Paul was able to stand his ground when others challenged him. He didn’t let their negative attitude shake his confidence.​—2 Corinthians 10:10; 11:5.

2 WHAT ARE MY WEAKNESSES?

Why it matters:
Just as a chain is only as strong as its weakest link, your identity can quickly change for the worse if you let your shortcomings get the upper hand.

Consider: Nobody’s perfect. (Romans 3:23) Everyone has some trait that they would like to change. “Why do I let the silliest things get to me?” asks a girl named Seija. “The smallest thing sets me off, and suddenly I lose control of my emotions!”

Bible example: Paul was aware of his weaknesses. He wrote: “I really delight in the law of God according to the man I am within, but I behold in my members another law warring against the law of my mind and leading me captive to sin’s law.”​—Romans 7:22, 23.

3 WHAT ARE MY GOALS?

Why it matters:
When you have goals, your life has direction and purpose. You’re also more likely to avoid people and situations that could hinder you from accomplishing what you’ve set out to do.

Consider: Would you get into a taxi and tell the driver to drive around the block repeatedly until his car ran out of fuel? That would be foolish​—and costly! Goals keep you from traveling in circles with your life. You have somewhere to go and a plan of how to get there.

Bible example: Paul wrote: “The way I am running is not uncertainly.” (1 Corinthians 9:26) Rather than drift through life letting things happen to him, Paul set goals and then lived in accord with them.​—Philippians 3:12-14.

4 WHAT ARE MY CONVICTIONS?

Why it matters:
Without convictions, you’ll be wishy-washy. Like a chameleon, you’ll change colors to blend in with your peers​—a sure sign that you don’t have your own identity.

Consider: The Bible encourages Christians to ‘prove to themselves the good and acceptable and perfect will of God.’ (Romans 12:2) When your actions are based on your convictions, you stay true to yourself​—regardless of what others do.

Bible example: While a teenager, the prophet Daniel “determined in his heart” that he would observe God’s laws, though separated from his family and fellow worshippers. (Daniel 1:8) By doing so, he stayed true to himself. Daniel lived in accord with his convictions.

Analyze yourself. What are your convictions? For example:

- Do you believe love is always good and hate is always bad? If so, why? What evidence convinces you of this?

- Do you believe love of self is always harmless? Perhaps even a requirement to love others as in the popular philosophy and slogan-like phrase: “you can't love if you don't love yourself”?*

These are not questions to answer quickly. Take time to consider the reasons for your beliefs.

In the end, which would you rather be like​—a fallen leaf that gets blown around by every mild breeze or a tree that withstands even powerful storms? Strengthen your identity, and you’ll be like that tree. And that will help you answer the question, Who am I?

“So we should no longer be children, tossed about as by waves and carried here and there by every wind of teaching by means of the trickery of men, by means of cunning in deceptive schemes.” (Eph 4:14)

*: What It Means to Love Our Neighbor

How Do We Love Our Neighbor as Ourselves?

Jesus said: “You must love your neighbor as yourself.” It is normal to care about ourselves and to have a healthy measure of self-respect. If that were not so, the commandment would have little meaning. This proper love of self is not to be confused with the egocentric love of self mentioned by the apostle Paul at 2 Timothy 3:2. Rather, it is a reasonable sense of self-worth. One Bible scholar described it as “a balanced self-love that is neither a narcissistic ‘I am divine’ nor a masochistic ‘I am dirt.’”

To love others as we love ourselves means that we view others as we want to be viewed and treat others as we would like to be treated. Jesus said: “All things, therefore, that you want men to do to you, you also must likewise do to them.” (Matthew 7:12) Notice that Jesus did not say to mull over what others have done to us in the past and then repay in kind. Instead, we are to think about how we would like to be treated and then act accordingly. Notice, too, that Jesus did not restrict his words to friends and brothers. He used the word “men,” perhaps to indicate that we should act in this way toward all people, everyone we meet.

Loving our neighbor will protect us from doing what is bad. The apostle Paul wrote: “The law code, ‘You must not commit adultery, You must not murder, You must not steal, You must not covet,’ and whatever other commandment there is, is summed up in this word, namely, ‘You must love your neighbor as yourself.’ Love does not work evil to one’s neighbor.” (Romans 13:9, 10) Love will move us to look for ways to work what is good toward others. By loving fellow humans, we demonstrate that we also love the one who created man in His image, Jehovah God.​—Genesis 1:26.

Do Not Be Fooled by “the Wisdom of This World”

The Bible says: “Everyone proud in heart is detestable to Jehovah.” (Prov. 16:5) Why does Jehovah detest proud people? One reason is that those who develop and promote an inflated love of self reflect Satan’s own arrogance. Imagine, Satan believed that Jesus​—the one whom God used to create all things—​should bow down and worship him! (Matt. 4:8, 9; Col. 1:15, 16) Those with such an inflated view of their own importance confirm that the wisdom of the world is foolishness with God.

THE BIBLE’S VIEW OF SELF-IMPORTANCE

The Bible helps us to have a balanced view of ourselves. It acknowledges that a degree of self-love is proper. Jesus said: “Love your neighbor as yourself,” which indicates that we should give a reasonable amount of attention to our needs. (Matt. 19:19) However, the Bible does not teach that we should elevate ourselves above others. Rather, it states: “Do nothing out of contentiousness or out of egotism, but with humility consider others superior to you.”​—Phil. 2:3; read Romans 12:3.

Today, many people who are considered wise would ridicule the Bible’s counsel about self-importance. They would say that considering others superior to you would make you vulnerable and that others would take advantage of you. Really, though, what fruitage has the self-centered attitude promoted by Satan’s world produced? What have you observed? . . . From what you have seen, which produces the best results​—following the wisdom of this world or the wisdom found in God’s Word?



posted on Jul, 18 2020 @ 01:42 PM
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Here we don't discuss whether this is creation, we know life is lived within temptation.
edit on 18-7-2020 by Out6of9Balance because: (no reason given)




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