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USS Bonhomme Richard on fire at Naval Base San Diego

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posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 05:50 AM
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originally posted by: mightmight
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

this good enough?

twitter.com...



Some rando's Twitter feed? No. The Navy said earlier they still need to assess the ship.




posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 05:57 AM
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originally posted by: BoneSay
Ship is lost, they just trying to prevent any more damage around it


The Navy hasn't made that determination at this point.



posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 06:36 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

There's nothing to determine.
The ship has been burning bow to stern for hours with no end in sight, the superstructure has been gutted and structural integrity is gone.



posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 06:37 AM
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originally posted by: mightmight
There's nothing to determine.


You should have the conversation with the Navy, they said it.



posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 07:17 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust
CNN says a tremendous cloud of Noxious smoke is enveloping parts of San Diego. A tremendous danger to Residents... with potential long-term consequences.



That was one of my first thoughts on seeing the video,

If you go to 4:12:00, there are people nonchalantly swimming from a boat while the vessel burns in the background, I certainly wouldn't want to be that close to the smoke, no matter the wind direction,

'Fire, what fire? 🤷🏻‍♂️'

SMH




posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 08:15 AM
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originally posted by: mightmight


a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

There's nothing to determine.
The ship has been burning bow to stern for hours with no end in sight, the superstructure has been gutted and structural integrity is gone.

There were ships sunk at Pearl Harbor that were re-floated, repaired and returned to fight in the war. One was hit by at least 7 torpedoes.
We are the mighty link

The USS West Virginia was one of the worst hit in the raid. The "Weevie," as it was called, had been hit by up to seven torpedoes, but no one could be certain exactly how many torpedoes hit it, really, because the damage was so severe. At least two torpedoes flowed through holes in the hull and exploded inside against the lower decks. Salvage crews were forced to create large patches that were held in place with underwater concrete. As seawater was pumped out, it was expected that the ship's electric drive would be unusable or would need extensive repairs but, surprisingly, it turned out that seawater hadn't reached the main propulsion plant. The alternators and motors were repaired, and the ship headed for Puget Sound Navy Yard. The ship received much better anti-aircraft armament and defensive armor and headed back into the fight in the Pacific. At the Battle of the Surigao Strait, Weevie fired ninety-three rounds into the Japanese fleet. It later hit Japanese forces ashore on Leyte, served at Luzon, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa, and was the first of the older battleships to sail into Tokyo Bay to witness Japan's surrender in 1945.



posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 08:59 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy

Also California, Tennessee, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Nevada.

Hell, the Nevada stood up to two atomic tests and naval gunfire training after the war and still didn't sink.



posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 09:19 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy

Different situation though. If they decide to repair in this case, they're looking at a major rebuild and a lot of money. There's no major need to rebuild her, and the new LHDs are coming on line.



posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 09:55 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: butcherguy

Different situation though. If they decide to repair in this case, they're looking at a major rebuild and a lot of money. There's no major need to rebuild her, and the new LHDs are coming on line.

Yes, and we were also freshly into a World War.
Of course the situation is different.
But to say that the decision has been made already that a ship still afloat won't be repaired is a bit hasty.
We don't know the extent of the damage and we don't know if they may want to do something that we would never think of with that hull.



posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 10:06 AM
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originally posted by: butcherguy
There were ships sunk at Pearl Harbor that were re-floated, repaired and returned to fight in the war. One was hit by at least 7 torpedoes.


Different technology levels, barely any electronics anywhere.
Also funds and yards capacity. You can rebuild a burned-out hulk if you wanted to. There's just zero chance of it happening.
They'll either reactivate USS Peleliu or make do with less and end up delaying the retirement of USS Wasp for a tour or two.



posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 10:13 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy

No, I agree that they'll do a full assessment before making any decisions, and I wasn't trying to say otherwise. Only that there was a lot more urgency and need for those ships after Pearl Harbor.



posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 10:15 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
Only that there was a lot more urgency and need for those ships after Pearl Harbor.


Was there? They were far too slow and fuel-hungry to be used. They didn't make it back into the Western Pacific until well into the war.

The newer North Carolina and South Dakota battleships along with the carriers were the only capital ships in the theater for close to two years.



posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 10:22 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

And repairing those ships, even though they took a couple years to do, freed up other ships to do other missions. Repair ten or twelve older ships, and you have ten or twelve older ships that can be used for escorts or rear security, so your newer more effective ships can go forward into combat zones.



posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 10:29 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
And repairing those ships, even though they took a couple years to do, freed up other ships to do other missions.


I'm not following. Most of the standard battleships never left the west coast until late 1943/early 1944 so I'm not seeing how they freed up anything. By the time they reentered service they had be mostly relegated to shore bombardment as the carrier doctrine was in place and only the newer fast battleships could provide escort duties for them.



posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 10:53 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

If you have 10 newer battleships, and both carrier escort and shore bombardment requirements, where do you put them? One or the other is getting shorted. If you repair 10 older battleships damaged in Pearl, now you've got 10 battleships for shore bombardment, and 10 newer battleships for carrier escort, and you're stronger in both. Send the older ships in to do shore bombardment, while the faster hulls are operating with the carriers, moving forward.



posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 11:51 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

But we were doing very little shore bombardment until late 1943/early 1944 anyway. The ships that made it back into service prior to that time weren't used for anything other than shore patrol on the west coast until the fuel situation was sorted out. There was no pressing need for the standard battleships up until that point, they were too slow, too fuel-hungry and ill-equipped to deal with the IJN.



posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 12:23 PM
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Updated new live feed.



Started streaming 85 mins ago.

edit on 13-7-2020 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 03:12 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

And if they weren't on patrol at that time other ships that were able to go forward into combat zones would have had to go on those patrols.



posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 03:50 PM
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There was no welding in the area at the time.

The halon system was largely shutdown.

The island has been gutted, the ship listing and parts of the superstructure have collapsed. I have serious doubts the ship being anything but lost.

www.thedrive.com...

www.thedrive.com...



posted on Jul, 13 2020 @ 04:01 PM
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a reply to: anzha

What Halon system?

There was no firemain pressure, so there was no way to fight the fire until a way to bring water to the fire was figured out. The ship had been in the yards for around two years. The crew was NOT living on the ship. They only had a light duty section on board.

The fire boats are cooling the hull to prevent the heat from cracking it, sinking the ship at the pier causing a major environmental issue.

Look at the mast by the island. It is collapsed from the heat. The heat may not melt the steel, but, it will weaken it until it cannot support the loads that are being applied to it. (9-11).




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