It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Atlanta rolls back to phase 1 COVID plan

page: 3
10
<< 1  2    4  5 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 06:12 PM
link   
a reply to: projectvxn

It should be noted that the curve is not flattened. It is steepening.

edit on 7/10/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 06:13 PM
link   

originally posted by: projectvxn

originally posted by: underwerks
a reply to: putnam6

Everyone is probably going to have to go back to Phase 1, and the economy is going to take another hit. All because people can’t be adults and just wear a damn mask.

Because of all the idiots that think an inconvenience is oppression.


We agreed to flatten the curve not destroy the economy over a virus the VAST majority of people survive without any issues.


The curve is no longer flat.



posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 06:48 PM
link   
Sounds like payback for the governor activating the national guard due to the mayor's inability to keep law and order. What percentage of the ICU beds are actually being used for covid? In Houston, another doom and gloom city, only 15% of the ICU beds have covid patients. Since the rollback to phase 1 is symbolic only this publicity stunt is completely irrelevant.



posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 06:59 PM
link   
a reply to: DeadlyStaringFrog




What percentage of the ICU beds are actually being used for covid?

That data does not seem to be available. The state doesn't seem to be providing those details.
But COVID hospitalizations have been on the rise lately so it's reasonable to think that would affect ICU use.

www.covid-georgia.com...


In any case, the more beds are filled, the fewer are available.
edit on 7/10/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)

edit on 7/10/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 07:13 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: DeadlyStaringFrog




What percentage of the ICU beds are actually being used for covid?

That data does not seem to be available. The state doesn't seem to be providing those details.
But COVID hospitalizations have been on the rise lately so it's reasonable to think that would affect ICU use.

www.covid-georgia.com...


In any case, the more beds are filled, the fewer are available.


Did you read what you linked to?



The number of current hospitalizations of COVID + patients has been climbing. The numbers of currently hospitalized patients do not include the number of patients hospitalized who are “under investigation” (PUI) for COVID-19, only those who have tested positive. Early on, there were substantial numbers of PUI (about 50%). Now, with more efficient testing, we have a much higher ratio of confirmed cases to PUI, so current numbers cannot be compared easily with earlier numbers.

I wish we had more insight into the current hospitalizations, like how many people are hospitalized with COVID (patients at the hospital for other reasons) versus for COVID, and how many people are under investigation for COVID vs already tested positive. Also, what regions are these hospitalizations in, and what kind of beds these patients are in (are they in the ER, the ICU, etc.?).

Our overall hospital utilization (especially critical care beds and ventilator usage) has not changed much and we still have plenty of general and ICU beds across the state, but some hospitals are very full. Keep in mind the vast majority of these beds are for non-COVID patients. Most patients in the hospital are there for reasons other than COVID.


Bolding mine.

The China Bug is just an excuse, IMO.



posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 07:26 PM
link   
a reply to: LookingAtMars

Yes, I did. And that is the situation in most places. It does not change the fact that increasing COVID hospitalizations are creating problems. They have to be isolated, for one thing. Staff has to wear PPE around them.



Jansen said that while numbers of coronavirus patients in the Intensive Car Unit are down, the actual numbers of patients in the hospitals are up because more people are getting the virus.

"The stress it puts on the hospital systems, the medical systems, is significant," Jansen said. "And that is increasing, not decreasing."

source

COVID has a disproportionate effect on hospitals, beyond the percentage of cases. And as more people are hospitalized for COVID or with COVID, that effect will become more of a problem. It is not unreasonable to expect ICU cases to begin to increase as well.



The curve is not flat. By a long shot.
edit on 7/10/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 07:36 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

It should be noted that deaths are flat and that testing has grown exponentially.



posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 07:38 PM
link   
a reply to: projectvxn


It should be noted that deaths are flat and that testing has grown exponentially.

Deaths are showing some spiking. They usually lag hospitalizations.
covidtracking.com...

edit on 7/10/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 07:42 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage



Our overall hospital utilization (especially critical care beds and ventilator usage) has not changed much


So lets shut the world down again for "has not changed much", why not....




edit on 10-7-2020 by LookingAtMars because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 07:46 PM
link   

originally posted by: projectvxn
a reply to: Phage

It should be noted that deaths are flat and that testing has grown exponentially.


We have learned a bit since this began.

However, if hospitals become overwhelmed, that death rate might start to rise.

Regardless, long term internal tissue damage from Covid is a reality.



posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 07:50 PM
link   
a reply to: Liquesence

I don't know how much Texas hospitals are "overwhelmed" but the death rate is certainly spiking there.
covidtracking.com...

The equation seems to go:

cases = x*hospitalizations = y*deaths

x seems to run about 0.15 to 0.20. That seems to be the nature of the beast.
As you say y could well be reduced by better techniques and younger patients, perhaps, but deaths will still rise.

edit on 7/10/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 07:56 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Liquesence

I don't know how much Texas hospitals are "overwhelmed" but the death rate is certainly spiking there.
covidtracking.com...


Houston and Corpus Christi are close to capacity, according to reports

Houston hospitals are increasingly turning away new patients as coronavirus overwhelms emergency rooms.

'It Just Exploded On Us': Coastal Bend Tries To Contain COVID-19 As ICU Capacity Dwindles

I haven't seen the actual data, but this is what the hospital are saying, apparently.

Which is also what I'm paying attention to here in GA.

Yes, X and Y will ultimately also rise, but by how much or more is the question. And focus
edit on 10-7-2020 by Liquesence because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 07:57 PM
link   
What do you expect after all the riots and protest that went on a few weeks ago. I think that is what has caused the spike. The protests need to be shut down, not the economy.


edit on 10-7-2020 by LookingAtMars because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 07:59 PM
link   

originally posted by: LookingAtMars
What do you expect after all the riots and protest that went on a few weeks ago. I thing that is what has caused the spike. The protests need to be shut down, not the economy.


Consensus is outdoor activities don't contribute as much to spikes as indoor activities where there is little social distancing (and w/o masks).



posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 08:07 PM
link   
a reply to: Liquesence



While experts agree the great outdoors reduces the risk of virus transmission as compared to confined areas with stagnant air, they also say there is still a theoretical risk. Critical factors influencing virus transmission from an infectious person to a susceptible person involve physical distancing, duration of time together and surrounding ventilation, doctors say.


Coronavirus Published May 20 Can I get coronavirus outside? Experts talk wind dispersal, provide safety tips

The protesters were not following the safety tips.



edit on 10-7-2020 by LookingAtMars because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 08:13 PM
link   
This whole post I'm referring to Atlanta and Georgia in general, because I have been in these hospitals talked with nurses and doctors, lab techs etc. as well as have family members that work at hospitals throughout the state. The informal consensus it's real but being overblown from administrators all the way to the media and politicians. Yes wear a mask BTW and keep an eye on those at risk. One comment I heard quite a few times unsolicited, is it's made people overly fearful.



posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 08:24 PM
link   
a reply to: Liquesence

Yeah. It isn't just a matter of bed space, that's for sure.

Texas provides a lot of data.
www.dshs.state.tx.us...

Here's bed availability by area. Nothing is showing 0, but some are tight. No COVID breakdown but that's not really the point.
www.dshs.state.tx.us...

Shows down about 50% from April on the whole, with quite a lot of variation. Maybe I'll graph it.

edit on 7/10/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 08:32 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

Which currently stands at .003% of all cases.




edit on 7 10 2020 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 08:43 PM
link   
a reply to: projectvxn

Which currently stands at .003% of all cases.

You seem to be referring to unknown cases. That's problematic and you seem to be using a very large multiplier. Like 1000:1 ?

As far as known cases goes, it's this:
Georgia:
Deaths 2,965
Cases 111,211
That's 2.6%


Nationwide:
Deaths 126,444
Cases 3,167,984
That's 3.9%

covidtracking.com...
edit on 7/10/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 10 2020 @ 09:03 PM
link   
Why does this all have to be political, rather than a health discussion? I really don't #in get it. Why can't we all talk about the science of the virus and what is sensible and what is not??

Or is debate/discussion boring? Maybe it isn't fun anymore. Maybe tagging the opposition is the name of the game.




top topics



 
10
<< 1  2    4  5 >>

log in

join