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Rocket Lab 13th launch ends in failure

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posted on Jul, 5 2020 @ 07:58 PM
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Rocket Lab 13th rocket launch (an unlucky number if ever...) , ended in failure as video contact was lost and the 2nd stage malfunctioned
6 minutes into the mission, The rocket named "PICS OR IT DIDNT HAPPEN" was to launch a Canadian imaging satellite along with several
smaller Cubesats

Launch appeared normal , though at Max Q (area of maximum dynamic air pressure) a decal peeled off the rocket . At 5 min 40 seconds the video feed from the second stage cut off, In following few seconds thrust from the seconds stage began failing until cut out completely . Rocket achieved apogee of about 200 km before falling into the South Pacific

Rocket Lab uses a unique electrical powered fuel pump. Most rockets us a turbo pump powered by burning fuel and O2 to use the hot gases to power a turbine linked to pump

Rocket Lab uses lithium battery packs to power the electrical fuel pumps , The 2nd stage uses a 3 battery pack, the first 2 batteries power the fuel pimp for the first few minutes , where it switches to the 3rd battery and first 2 batteries are jettisoned,

Speculation is in a failure of the battery packs which caused 2nd stage to cut out

Scott Manley has a video discussing the failure

www.youtube.com...



edit on 5-7-2020 by firerescue because: (no reason given)

edit on 5-7-2020 by firerescue because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 5 2020 @ 08:10 PM
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a reply to: firerescue

That’s a shame. The fact that they use battery packs is pretty unique. I guess they need to tweak those a bit.



posted on Jul, 5 2020 @ 08:24 PM
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Soon it will be very apparent that we cannot go beyond low earth orbit. The plasmapause - the outer layer of our atmosphere - is a 24,000km span that ranges between temperatures of 6,000-30,000 degrees Celsius. To put that in perspective, 6,000 degrees is the temperature of the sun. The Apollo rockets could not have gotten through this plasma hot layer.

'Pics or it didn't happen' is the perfect name indeed.



posted on Jul, 5 2020 @ 08:44 PM
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a reply to: cooperton

If the earth is flat and every satellite is fake anyway, why bother with failed launches at all? Why not declare every launch be declared a success. If not, who decides what launches were successes and which were not?

Who decides what insurance company gets to foot the bill when Bob from the global hoax dept. says nope we are calling this one a failure to keep up appearances?

I cant imagine such an expensive payload delivery wouldn't be insured. Heck my car has to be insured. International cargo is all insured. Every passenger flight is insured.

Even if the payloads are all fake the insurance companies would still have to pay out to keep up appearences, right?

I mean if the earth is flat and every satellite and orbiting body is just a pixel on a huge screen above our heads, why not just add another pixel to the feed and zip it along its course instead of screwing over x, y, or z inssurance company at random with a "failed" launch.

This seems to be a huge flaw in the flat earth theory. One among many might I add.



posted on Jul, 5 2020 @ 08:47 PM
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originally posted by: cooperton
Soon it will be very apparent that we cannot go beyond low earth orbit. The plasmapause - the outer layer of our atmosphere





posted on Jul, 5 2020 @ 09:18 PM
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In my trax car the batteries are.....fragile....no bump ya know....do not drop.....in a rocket?....no, please



posted on Jul, 5 2020 @ 09:28 PM
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a reply to: cooperton

One problem with your little conspiracy fantasy - the temperature of the space is dependent on the energy level
of residual gas molecules which is caused by UV and X rays from the sun striking the gas molecules

The temperature, while it is high because of the energy from solar radiation , does not have an efficient means of transmitting the energy because there are so few gas molecules in the area to transfer the energy to other materials

No gas molecules, no energy transfer ……...



posted on Jul, 5 2020 @ 09:41 PM
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originally posted by: cooperton
Soon it will be very apparent that we cannot go beyond low earth orbit. The plasmapause - the outer layer of our atmosphere - is a 24,000km span that ranges between temperatures of 6,000-30,000 degrees Celsius. To put that in perspective, 6,000 degrees is the temperature of the sun. The Apollo rockets could not have gotten through this plasma hot layer.

'Pics or it didn't happen' is the perfect name indeed.


WTF? Just stop already. Don’t hijack threads with your idiotic conspiracy theories. That is very disrespectful to the OP.



posted on Jul, 6 2020 @ 12:39 AM
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a reply to: firerescue

It's a shame, but sometimes things happen when you push the envelope.

Hopefully, we can figure out the reason from the telemetry we did get and ensure it never happens again.

Onward and upward!



posted on Jul, 6 2020 @ 06:54 AM
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Nope. Go home.

FYI the temperature of the sun is 15 MILLION DEGREES CELCIUS.

a reply to: cooperton



posted on Jul, 6 2020 @ 07:01 AM
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Oh, I should also point out that I am posting using satellite internet right now. An EM signal is travelling from my house to space, EchoStar XIX is the name of the satellite. It's in geosynchronous orbit at ~35500 km. The plasmapause is at ~24000 km from Earth's surface.

Explain.

Or am I just a conspiracy too?



a reply to: cooperton



posted on Jul, 6 2020 @ 08:27 AM
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originally posted by: cooperton
Soon it will be very apparent that we cannot go beyond low earth orbit. The plasmapause - the outer layer of our atmosphere - is a 24,000km span that ranges between temperatures of 6,000-30,000 degrees Celsius. To put that in perspective, 6,000 degrees is the temperature of the sun. The Apollo rockets could not have gotten through this plasma hot layer.

'Pics or it didn't happen' is the perfect name indeed.


The plasmasphere does contain very hot molecules, but those molecules are very sparse. They are so few and far between that they don't have any appreciable effect on something passing through it.

Think of it this way using this similar example:
If I were walking through the Arizona desert in July, the overall air temperature I measure around me might be 100 degrees F. The sunlight heats up the air molecules around me, and all of those heated molecules makes me feel hot. However, if I were in 35,000 feet above the desert (like where a passenger jet cruises), the temperature might be -40 degrees F (40 degrees below zero).

That difference in temperature has nothing to do with each air molecule being cooler; the same amount of sunlight is still heating the air molecules. But rather it's due to there being fewer air molecules at 35,000 feet. The sun is still heating up each air molecule at 35,000 feet as it was near ground level, but with fewer molecules touching my body and transferring some of their heat to me, the overall temperature I would feel around me would be lower.

So rockets can fly through the plasmasphere/plasmapause. That's because even though each molecule might be very hot, the plasmasphere is a near-vacuum and has very few of those hot molecules to transfer their heat to the rocket, so their overall effect on the rocket of those very few molecules transferring heat to the rocket would not be enough to make the entire rocket itself hot.

-

We have empirical evidence of rockets that have made it through: satellites that help broadcast TV and radio signals. Those satellites are about 23,000 miles up -- beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). A 23,000-mile high orbit is the usual altitude for geostationary satellites. Those satellites would be beyond the plasmapause, which ends about 16,000 miles up. There are many weather satellites that are also in geostationary orbits well beyond LEO.

Many of these geostationary satellites are visible from the ground. If two people in two different places on Earth look at the same geostationary satellite at the same time, they can use parallax to calculate its height.

That's why websites like heavensabove.com can work. That website can tell someone in (say) Dallas where exactly in the sky to see a particular geostationary satellite while it tells someone in Miami where THEY should look to see the exact same satellite at the exact same time. Both of those people would look in different distinct locations of the sky to see that satellite, and by comparing those sky locations with each other, those two people could do a little math to calculate the satellite's altitude.

The same goes for the websites that tell you where to point a TV satellite dish. Anyone could use a little trigonometry to calculate the height of a particular satellite based on the exact locations in the sky that two dishes remote from each other are pointing.


edit on 7/6/2020 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2020 @ 09:14 AM
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originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: firerescue

It's a shame, but sometimes things happen when you push the envelope.

Hopefully, we can figure out the reason from the telemetry we did get and ensure it never happens again.

Onward and upward!


Yeah SpaceX's estimated time to get to the moon is 6 days, whereas apollo somehow claims to have done it in 3. It is relevant to the 'pics or it didnt happen' rocket (hilarious name, thought this was a parody article at first). Geosynchronous orbit is undeniable and I retract what I said about low earth orbit. I was actually going off what a NASA engineer said, but after listening again he was referring to the inability to send humans past the van allen belts


starts at 3 minutes

This is strange because NASA during the apollo missions somehow knew how to traverse it, but not anymore? I love the new attempts to make it there and I'm excited to get clear information regarding our habitation in the cosmos
edit on 6-7-2020 by cooperton because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2020 @ 10:04 AM
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Electric powered (motorized) turbo pumps, that’s interesting!

Normally they are kerosene powered, think of a jet engine with a centrifugal liquid pump bolted on the end. The benefit of using fuel is it’s part of the main rocket fuel system. Also the fact that as fuel is burned off the lighter the vehicle becomes, less mass to increase velocity.

Using battery packs for that, the weight in regards to the turbo pump remains the same.



posted on Jul, 6 2020 @ 11:18 AM
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originally posted by: cooperton
I was actually going off what a NASA engineer said, but after listening again he was referring to the inability to send humans past the van allen belts

starts at 3 minutes

This is strange because NASA during the apollo missions somehow knew how to traverse it, but not anymore? I love the new attempts to make it there and I'm excited to get clear information regarding our habitation in the cosmos


Orion relies heavily on today's electronics rather than the more analog hardware of the Apollo era because Orion is designed to do more than the Apollo CM. As the guy in the video says, the radiation of the Van Allen belts can affect Orion's more sensitive electronics if they weren't shielded.

Therefore, he is absolutely correct in saying that the Orion's electronics and their shielding will need to be tested before sending people through the Van Allen belts in that spacecraft.

It would not be good if they send people on the Orion spacecraft through the belts and then the electronics in that spacecraft fail them. For that matter, the entire Orion craft needs to be tested before sending people on it. That's also because NASA may want to fly the Orion craft on a route that goes more directly through the belts, rather that using the round-about (and fuel-consuming) circuitous path taken by the Apollo capsules through the belts.

All of these factors together means it would be too risky (in NASA's modern era of risk management) to send people through the belts -- and potentially through a denser part of the belts than crews have gone before -- on a craft that has never been tested in the belts.


edit on 7/6/2020 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2020 @ 11:26 AM
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a reply to: 38181

Yes the idea being to eliminate and simply the design by removing the weight and complexity of the plumbing and valves
needed to fuel the turbo pump. The pump, is powered by a turbine burning kerosene (RP1) and Lox - the mix ratio is
very fuel rich to avoid melting the turbine

If you look at some large rockets can see the turbine exhaust usually very dark and sooty

The Rocket Lab Electron, which is we are talking about is a very small rocket. it is only 55 ft (17 m) tall and 4 ft (1.2m)
diameter

The first stage is powered by 9 small (4000 - 4500 lb thrust) engines with second stage having a single 4500 ln engine

Idea was to use the electric fuel pump to save weight



posted on Jul, 6 2020 @ 02:27 PM
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a reply to: firerescue

That makes sense on these small rockets. I can see the viability of electric motorized pumps, some of these electric motors are phenomenal, especially paired with today’s batteries. This is exciting.



posted on Jul, 6 2020 @ 02:33 PM
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originally posted by: cooperton
Soon it will be very apparent that we cannot go beyond low earth orbit. The plasmapause - the outer layer of our atmosphere - is a 24,000km span that ranges between temperatures of 6,000-30,000 degrees Celsius. To put that in perspective, 6,000 degrees is the temperature of the sun. The Apollo rockets could not have gotten through this plasma hot layer.

'Pics or it didn't happen' is the perfect name indeed.


Yeah because the Soviets let us just have that giant propaganda victory by "beating" them to the moon when they could've proven it's impossible...

You guys really do not think this # through.



posted on Jul, 6 2020 @ 02:43 PM
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originally posted by: cooperton
Soon it will be very apparent that we cannot go beyond low earth orbit. The plasmapause - the outer layer of our atmosphere - is a 24,000km span that ranges between temperatures of 6,000-30,000 degrees Celsius. To put that in perspective, 6,000 degrees is the temperature of the sun. The Apollo rockets could not have gotten through this plasma hot layer.

'Pics or it didn't happen' is the perfect name indeed.


Wouldn't the fact that there have already been very many successful missions beyond low-Earth-orbit, indicate that the 'problem' you propose doesn't actually exist?

And although this particular shot failed, Rocket Lab has already lofted rockets that went higher than this one and have achieved orbit.

edit on 6/7/2020 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2020 @ 03:36 PM
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originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: cooperton
Soon it will be very apparent that we cannot go beyond low earth orbit. The plasmapause - the outer layer of our atmosphere - is a 24,000km span that ranges between temperatures of 6,000-30,000 degrees Celsius. To put that in perspective, 6,000 degrees is the temperature of the sun. The Apollo rockets could not have gotten through this plasma hot layer.

'Pics or it didn't happen' is the perfect name indeed.


Wouldn't the fact that there have already been very many successful missions beyond low-Earth-orbit, indicate that the 'problem' you propose doesn't actually exist?

And although this particular shot failed, Rocket Lab has already lofted rockets that went higher than this one and have achieved orbit.


Hey we can agree on something.



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