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Tr3b/ aurora/ astra over texas last night ?

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posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 08:56 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Its maiden flight took place in 1981 at Groom Lake, Nevada, and the aircraft achieved initial operating capability status in 1983. The Nighthawk was shrouded in secrecy until it was revealed to the public in 1988. Of the 64 F-117s built, 59 were production versions, with the other five being prototypes.

The technology for the F-117 was developed in the 1970s, and the first F-117 unit reached initial operating capability in October 1983, becoming the first operational, purpose-built stealth aircraft.




posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 08:58 AM
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a reply to: edharris79

Which is hardly the 20 years you claimed in your post. Even the SR-71 was public before it ever flew, contrary to popular myth.



posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 08:59 AM
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a reply to: edharris79

The B-2 was rolled out and unveiled to the public in November of 1988, with first flight in July 1989.



posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 09:48 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
The Advanced Technology Bomber (ATB) program began in 1979.[15] Full development of the black project followed, and was funded under the code name "Aurora".[16] After the evaluations of the companies' proposals, the ATB competition was narrowed to the Northrop/Boeing and Lockheed/Rockwell teams with each receiving a study contract for further work.[15] Both teams used flying wing designs.[16] The Northrop proposal was code named "Senior Ice" and the Lockheed proposal code named "Senior Peg".[17] Northrop had prior experience developing the YB-35 and YB-49 flying wing aircraft.[18] The Northrop design was larger while the Lockheed design included a small tail.[16] In 1979, designer Hal Markarian produced a sketch of the aircraft, that bore considerable similarities to the final design.[19] The Air Force originally planned to procure 165 of the ATB bomber.[1]

The Northrop team's ATB design was selected over the Lockheed/Rockwell design on 20 October 1981.[15][20] The Northrop design received the designation B-2 and the name "Spirit". The bomber's design was changed in the mid-1980s when the mission profile was changed from high-altitude to low-altitude, terrain-following. The redesign delayed the B-2's first flight by two years and added about US$1 billion to the program's cost.[14] An estimated US$23 billion was secretly spent for research and development on the B-2 by 1989.[21] MIT engineers and scientists helped assess the mission effectiveness of the aircraft under a five-year classified contract during the 1980s.[

you really think its first public flight was its first in 1989 for the "public" you think they would spend a billion + dollars and well over a decade in development without testing early prototypes in flight thats some imagination brah



posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 11:37 AM
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a reply to: edharris79

Even if they did fly it before the public rollout, which they didn't, they still wouldn't be even remotely close to your claim of 20 years.

You obviously don't have a clue how military procurement works though "brah". Until recently, they didn't give a crap about overruns in cost or schedule, so spending a billion dollars to design, develop, and build them was common.



posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 11:40 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

and your MOS is



posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 11:41 AM
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a reply to: edharris79

Noneya. Let me guess, you worked advanced procurement at the Pentagon.



posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 12:14 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

exactly what i thought so keep floating that opinion. fact is the military is not gonna dump a billion dollars into something and over a decade in development cost and logistics and debut it for the public without knowing it can fly or function and make them look dumb as hell. Versions of That craft was flown long before any "public" debut.



posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 12:24 PM
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a reply to: edharris79

Yeah, you don't know crap about military procurement. Look at some of the major programs underway right now. The KC-46 is a $4.6B contract, with a $4.9B cap. Boeing has spent that much in their own money in overruns, with at least another $600M to go, with the Air Force responsible for $55M of that. And guess what, it doesn't work. The boom scratches receivers, the camera system for the boom needs to be completely redesigned and replaced, the underwing drogue pods aren't certified, and other issues.

The F-35 has been in development for almost 20 years and still has significant deficiencies. Currently it can't fly near lightning because of damage found to a system to protect against fuel tank explosions. They have at least 15 deficiencies still to be corrected, or that will be left as is. And they're about to accept the 250th aircraft for the Air Force.

But yeah, they'd absolutely never spend a billion dollars on something without knowing it works. Keep dreaming.



posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 12:31 PM
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a reply to: edharris79

You know what happens to black projects with no results? they end up in the scrap heap
perfect example 2 years of intensive testing on the f15 befor it was even designated as an f15 and took its "first" flight
McDonnell Aircraft formalized the concept for the F-15 in 1967 when the company was selected to enter the second phase of the U.S Air Force's FX competition. Competing against Fairchild Hiller and North American Rockwell, McDonnell used lessons learned during the Vietnam War on the changing nature of jet age air-to-air combat, given that the F-4 Phantom II was earning its reputation as a formidable fighter. On Dec. 23, 1969, after more than two years of intensive testing and evaluation, the Air Force awarded McDonnell Douglas the F-15 Advanced Tactical Fighter contract. The McDonnell Douglas team had placed first among the three competitors in all phases of the competition and had the lowest contract price.

On June 26, 1972, James S. McDonnell, founder of McDonnell Aircraft, christened the F-15 "Eagle." Test pilot Irv Burrows took the first F-15 Eagle to the air on July 27, 1972, at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Six months later, the Air Force approved the Eagle for full-rate production.

so on a non super secret black project an open one such as the f15 they was flying f15s around for 2 years from 3 different companies befor the first "f15" took flight

Military programs differ from commercial in that the government contracts with the aircraft manufacturer to design and build an aircraft to meet specific mission capabilities. These performance requirements are documented to the manufacturer in the aircraft specification and the details of the flight test program (among many other program requirements) are spelled out in the statement of work. In this case, the government is the customer and has a direct stake in the aircraft's ability to perform the mission. Since the government is funding the program, it is more involved in the aircraft design and testing from early-on. Often military test pilots and engineers are integrated as part of the manufacturer's flight test team. The final phase of the military aircraft flight test is the Operational Test (OT). OT is conducted by a government-only test team with the dictate to certify that the aircraft is suitable and effective to carry out the intended mission.[citation needed] befor any public can see a military plane they know damn well it can fly



posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 12:33 PM
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a reply to: edharris79

yeah long time on the f-35 but guess what they been flying them before they are really official and "fixed"



posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 12:36 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
again irrelevant to what im talking about its KC-46 "not ready" but yet it flys they dont spend a billion dollars on something if it cant fly to begin with you missing entire point



posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 12:41 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

fighterjetsworld.com...
tell me how many of these technology demonstrators are flight capable basically smaller of skeletons of their official models.
that bird of prey is a good example.



posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 12:42 PM
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Nice ATS material


a reply to: edharris79



posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 12:46 PM
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a reply to: edharris79

No, they weren't flying F-15s around. They performed thousands of hours of wind tunnel testing, and "flights" in the simulator before they ever flew an F-15. The first F-15 flight was 1972, and some of the more dangerous tests were performed with an RPV that was dropped from a NASA B-52.

The F-35 didn't fly anything before they were publicly acknowledged. Even the final selection was broadcast on tv. The X-35 flew test flights until the first F-35 was built(the two aren't the same), but it was all public. The X-35 and X-32 flew before the selection, but only for a few months prior. The X-35 first flew in October of 2000, with formal selection in 2001.
edit on 7/7/2020 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 12:49 PM
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a reply to: edharris79

The A-12 was flying before it was acknowledged, but that was a CIA program. The SR-71 was unveiled before it ever flew. Bird of Prey was a technology demonstrator not an actual program of record. The F-117 was already said to have flown less than 10 years before going public.



posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 03:46 PM
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The real ones do not move like that at all of course. They hover then sometimes even well...... go somewhere else. Learned that from Art Bell and of course ATS.



posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 05:20 PM
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originally posted by: Macenroe82
Most likely another one of these LED kites


I never understood why a UFO would have any lights past maybe a glow from the power plant in the first place, did the shuttle have any lights other than maybe landing lights, as example.



posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 07:43 PM
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a reply to: edharris79

Kite. Posted all over the internet



posted on Jul, 7 2020 @ 09:26 PM
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I'm sorry to tell all the factoid bros here but public information is not accurate regarding these projects - there is no reason for them to be.

My grandfather worked on many of the black projects and shuttle up until the early 90's and would tell us zero about anything - the only 3 things I knew - he went before congress regarding 1 project, it was wiped from the record - we have a picture of him inspecting the wing of a B2 in a book released in the mid 90's which he wont comment on and when I asked him about the b2 he would only say he was surprised to see it on TV.

When I asked him 1x about things he gave me the company line "we have things 20-50 years beyond what you know." I heard the same thing from a project lead during it's initial construction at the Groom Lake facility.

The reason he had access to so many projects was he was a specialist in non destructive testing for decades and that he worked with Rockwell, Lockheed Martin and Nasa, thats all we really do know. My Uncle also does stuff in that realm and has never said a single word about anything and we dont ask, so if anyone tells you they are this or that and have information I would challenge them.


edit on 7-7-2020 by circuitsports because: (no reason given)




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