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Starlink satellite internet beta sign up

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posted on Jun, 17 2020 @ 06:26 PM
link   
For those of you who have asked questions,
A couple of facts And speculations I just read....

Each satellite will communicate with 4 others using lasers.
Lasers allow the data rate to exchange at the speed of light, just like fibre optic currently comes close to.

Estimated cost per month: $80
Set up package Fee estimate: $100-$300

An initial beta test partnership between the US Air Force and Starlink, called Global Lightning, saw download speeds of 610 Mbps using 2 of the StarLink satellites.
Users will have 4 satellites beaming the data

An initial beta test partnership between the US Air Force and Starlink, called Global Lightning, saw download speeds of 610 Mbps.

SpaceXs ultimate mega constellation will consist of 42,000 fricken satellites.

Starlink will also rely on ground terminals or gateways to bring internet into your home. Musk said they look like a “small- to medium-sized pizza,” which led to the internet calling these terminals and gateways “pizza boxes.”

To compare, a satellite internet plan from Viasat ranges from $30 to $150 a month for download speeds of 12 Mbps up to 100 Mbps, and HughesNet plans range from about $60 to $150 a month for download speeds of 25 Mbps.

Source for above points
edit on 17-6-2020 by Macenroe82 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 17 2020 @ 06:30 PM
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originally posted by: crayzeed
When will it change it's name to Skynet?


Starlink...
Skynet...
Uh oh.



posted on Jun, 17 2020 @ 07:29 PM
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a reply to: Macenroe82




Perhaps the beta will address such issues.

the're only solution & one bad actually == one user's modem connects to many visible sats at the same time, but speed gets ruined by redundancy number. yet another problem is when ion thruster runs the're no power left for anything else.



posted on Jun, 17 2020 @ 07:37 PM
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a reply to: Macenroe82




Each satellite will communicate with 4 others using lasers. Lasers allow the data rate to exchange at the speed of light, just like fibre optic currently comes close to.

free space (wireless) laser connections showed not good results even for vacuum. there looks like space radiation makes them fuzzy.



posted on Jun, 17 2020 @ 07:53 PM
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a reply to: SarK0Y

Sounds like nonsense.
Do you have a source?


The first commercial laser intersatellite link, Airbus’s SpaceDataHighway, began operation in 2016, using Tesat laser communications terminals to transmit high-priority image data collected by four satellites in low-Earth orbit at rates to 1.8 Gbit/s to relays in geosynchronous orbit for radio transmission to the ground. The high-speed laser uplink in the low satellite tracks the geosynchronous satellite so it can relay images quickly, without having to wait to pass over a ground station. Then, the synchronous orbit can relay the images to cloud servers on the ground via its high-speed microwave link. Addition of a second geosynchronous satellite in 2019 increased relay speed.

www.laserfocusworld.com...
edit on 6/17/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 17 2020 @ 08:02 PM
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a reply to: SarK0Y

You obviously do not understand the technology they are using so why are you even posting this negative #?
Do you think they would spend this kind of money on a system that operates the way you think it will?
Educate yourself on what they are doing.
edit on 17-6-2020 by charlyv because: (no reason given)

edit on 17-6-2020 by charlyv because: correct context



posted on Jun, 17 2020 @ 08:03 PM
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a reply to: charlyv

SpaceX = bad (for Russian space industry)
edit on 6/17/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 17 2020 @ 08:09 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Yeah... gets my goat when nubes with agenda's start spouting off crap they do not know what they are talking about.



posted on Jun, 17 2020 @ 09:04 PM
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a reply to: Phage




collected by four satellites in low-Earth orbit at rates to 1.8 Gbit/s to relays in geosynchronous orbit for radio transmission to the ground. The high-speed laser uplink in the low satellite tracks the

looks funny...



ViaSat-2 is a commercial communications satellite launched June 1, 2017 and went live late February 2018. It was advertised to be the world's highest capacity communications satellite with a throughput of 300 Gbit/s, succeeding HughesNet EchoStar XIX launched in December 2016.[2] It is the second Ka-band satellite launched by ViaSat after ViaSat-1. The satellite provides internet service through ViaSat (Exede prior to rebranding) to North America, parts of South America, including Mexico and the Caribbean, and to air and maritime routes across the Atlantic Ocean to Europe.[1]
en.wikipedia.org...

now let's see laser links via optic fibers...



Year : 2009; Organization: Alcatel-Lucent; Effective speed: 15.5Tbit per sec; WDM channels: 155; Per channel speed: 100Gbit per s; Distance: 7000km
en.wikipedia.org...

So, even your source shows how how poor wireless laser links perform

edit on 17-6-2020 by SarK0Y because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 17 2020 @ 09:16 PM
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a reply to: SarK0Y
Neat. I don't think anyone is claiming Starlink will be faster than fiber.

Now how about some evidence that "space radiation" affects lasers.


edit on 6/17/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 17 2020 @ 09:30 PM
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a reply to: Phage




Now how about some evidence that "space radiation" affects lasers.

ionizing radiation provides electrical surge in the detectors & emitters of laser beam.



Neat. I don't think anyone is claiming Starlink will be faster than fiber.

actually, it will not stand even versus high-orbit sats.



posted on Jun, 17 2020 @ 09:32 PM
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a reply to: SarK0Y




ionizing radiation provides electrical surge in the detectors & emitters of laser beam.

Sure it does. That's why radios don't work in space. That's why cameras don't work in space. That's why computers don't work in space. Because there's no such thing as shielding.

edit on 6/17/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 17 2020 @ 09:44 PM
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a reply to: Phage



. Because there's no such thing as shielding.

Your sarcasm makes me to ask you: how would you like to shield detectors??? some tricks to protect emitters look possible, but not ideal. detectors are another story == they need to be highly sensitive (ain't good for shielding at all).



posted on Jun, 18 2020 @ 03:45 AM
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a reply to: Macenroe82

this is so cool I sent an email to elon musk asking him to provide global internet service for the world
and he does this

?

I'll need to check my sent emails and see the date
he probably already had it planned but it was cool to see it happen anyway

edit on 18-6-2020 by sapien82 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2020 @ 08:52 AM
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a reply to: Phage




Sure it does. That's why radios don't work in space. That's why cameras don't work in space.

between RF communication & laser ones get planted simple difference, it's FREQUENCY == the higher one means the lower thermal efficacy at given power. So, L-links at high power have high internal noise & ,at low one, suffer external noise == classical deadlock
cams are completely another story == software filters suppress distortions in the video/images.



posted on Jun, 18 2020 @ 11:58 AM
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originally posted by: crayzeed
When will it change it's name to Skynet?


Someone beat them to that name.

www.scmp.com...




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