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Questions about college and all that

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posted on Jun, 9 2020 @ 10:36 PM
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Alright everyone. I have some questions that I believe can be answered here.

I never went to college. Never had to. Worked my butt off, and got good at what I did.

Now I'm planning on going to college. I already know what I want to do, and this isn't about that.

My question is:

Should I go to a community college if I'm not worried about cost?

Or should I just go straight to whatever college or university I want to go to?

I've talked to a few people over the past few months, and they've all told me to go to a community college first.

But why?

It just seems like it would be more of a hassle.

I could go to my local state university and do well enough that if I wanted to I could transfer to a college/university that has cooler lab stuff, but ultimately I just want to get the stupid piece of paper.

So, what say you ATS-ers?
edit on 962020 by AutomateThis1 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 9 2020 @ 10:39 PM
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originally posted by: AutomateThis1

So, what say you ATS-ers?


Stay in drugs. Don't do skool.



If cost isn't an issue then what's the issue? If cost isn't an issue then do whatever you feel is best. I think the idea of cc is just to dip your toes in the water and get acclimated.

If you know what you want, go for it!





edit on 9-6-2020 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2020 @ 10:40 PM
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a reply to: AutomateThis1

Unless you are getting it free (tuition reimbursement), I would not waste my time unless you are going for something that truly requires it for the job function AND for a job that actually pays.

Doctor, Chemical Engineer, Dentist, ect.


Otherwise spend a fraction of the time and money and go get certified in internet security, project management, cisco certified network professional, etc. and actually have a well paid career.
edit on 9-6-2020 by infolurker because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2020 @ 10:41 PM
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The reason you go to a community college is the get all the basic requirement courses out of the way. Community colleges will offer those base credits for far cheaper than the big state school will and the course schedule will be one that would work around a regular schedule much easier.

The only caveat would be to do your homework and make sure that your general ed credits will transfer to whatever major college you plan on earning your actual degree from.



posted on Jun, 9 2020 @ 10:42 PM
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a reply to: AutomateThis1

Community college first but you must make sure the credits transfer to the University you want to attend.

The reasoning is you can knock out 2-3 semesters at a fraction of the costs. Community colleges are cheaper.
English, math, history, or any other electives. CC is going to same you some coin.



posted on Jun, 9 2020 @ 11:03 PM
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Yeah, I mean... I get the point of going to a community college if I was going to be the one fronting the money or signing a loan, but I'm not.

I've got enough benefits owed me and allowed to me that I could pull a Bernie and stay in school for quite a long time, before I even started to think about using my own money.

I guess a follow up question could be would it be easier to get better grades in a community college, thus making it easier to get into a better school? I always heard that the education received at community colleges was rather sub-par. Could be false, but again I don't know that's just what I've heard.

Say for instance I wanted to go to the Georgia Institute of Technology. I don't know if I could get into it just by applying. It's supposed to be a pretty nice school, and even though the admittance rate is higher than, IDK MIT for instance. I haven't stepped foot onto a campus for over a decade.

Or should I just stick with Middle Tennessee State University for the whole ride?

Really the only reason I'm even considering going to college is to network and open up my career options, and maybe have an opportunity to work on some really cool projects.

Somehow I've managed to work myself into a really specialized career, where even though I'm really good at what I do, there aren't really any of those positions available where I'm at that will hire me without a degree.

I've thought about going into a completely different career path, but I'm pretty settled on just continuing down the road I started on.



posted on Jun, 9 2020 @ 11:05 PM
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Also, can I not just CLEP out of all the gen ed classes? That's still a thing right? I mean why waste time and money on classes when I can just pay to take a test and get it over with?



posted on Jun, 9 2020 @ 11:29 PM
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If it's like it was when I was in school, you could only test out of some courses.

As far as networking, you really aren't going to hit a lot of that in your general ed credits, and if you know the material pretty much anyhow, does the quality of the course matter to you more than the easy A to pad your eventual GPA? So long as the course transfers to your eventual final school of choice, then it's all good. An easy A is better than one where you might have to bust your butt to get the same grade.

I had an Ocreanography 101 course that was supposed to be an easy gen. ed. credit course where I ran afoul of the expert professor who deigned to teach the lowly undergrads. He gave tests the grad students feared ... to the basic students! I had to retake the class and got lucky because he ended up on research in Spain that semester and grad student taught it. I passed it easy then.

But he would write out an entire page worth's of text for a multiple choice question and you would have to go through and be able to pick out the one lone thing that might be wrong to make a choice invalid for your answer because each option for an answer would have over a paragraph's worth of text you had to work through too. Half the test was those, and the other half was essays where you had to write no less than an entire page in length to answer each one.



posted on Jun, 9 2020 @ 11:58 PM
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what ketsuko said.
I've been to both. Like everyone said, cost is the main reason and you can knock out the required basics while working around a job easier. My cc was very good. Not subpar in the least, and when I dd transfer to Uni I was ahead of many of my classmates simply because the cc classes were so thorough. It all depends on the professors. And do some research on your cc's and see how they rate.
You will not have all the university 'accouterments' in a cc but it is usually surprisingly workable. That being said, if you do go straight to Uni, you can dive right in and get the learning curve started early. (learn best ways to navigate the system and campus etc)
Have fun! It's very exciting and rewarding.
Have you started applying to your local colleges already? Get that started and see where it leads. Good luck and have fun!

edit on 10-6-2020 by Starcrossd because: added info



posted on Jun, 10 2020 @ 12:29 AM
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Well, I gotta figure out when the next semester is starting. I don't know what's going on with school with the whole Covid BS, so I was planning on contacting a few different schools in the area to find out.

I still also need to get some things finished up with the VA that's also a pain in the butt due to the whole Covid thing. So, it's just a one thing at a time kind of thing.

There are a few different community colleges in my area. I don't really desire to do any online education as I just don't know how I feel about it, I wouldn't mind doing it if it was just for the gen ed stuff. I just don't want to be doing online courses when it comes to the courses that actually pertain to the major of my choice.

But we'll see. After all, like I said. I really just want to get the piece of paper. It would just be nice to be able to make some new memories along the way. Which I don't think would happen from sitting in my underwear in front of a computer lol.



posted on Jun, 10 2020 @ 07:07 AM
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originally posted by: AutomateThis1
Alright everyone. I have some questions that I believe can be answered here.

I never went to college. Never had to. Worked my butt off, and got good at what I did.

Now I'm planning on going to college. I already know what I want to do, and this isn't about that.

My question is:

Should I go to a community college if I'm not worried about cost?

Or should I just go straight to whatever college or university I want to go to?

I've talked to a few people over the past few months, and they've all told me to go to a community college first.

But why?

It just seems like it would be more of a hassle.

I could go to my local state university and do well enough that if I wanted to I could transfer to a college/university that has cooler lab stuff, but ultimately I just want to get the stupid piece of paper.

So, what say you ATS-ers?


A few questions:

1) What subject are you planning to major in? This is important to know because it determines how much the brand name of the school matters. Are you attending school full time or part time? What universities or colleges are you considering?

2) It sounds like you've already been successful without college. How does going to college play in that success? If you don't need college for work, I assume you are just going for personal benefit?

The reality is that there are only about 30 colleges / universities that have real name cache. After those schools, it doesn't matter as much where you go.

Given you are a non-traditional student, I would focus on going somewhere convenient and fits into your life more than anything. If you are older, you aren't likely to have the traditional college / univeristy experience.



posted on Jun, 10 2020 @ 07:08 AM
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a reply to: AutomateThis1

First ... look into UMUC or Central Texas College. You'll want to take two on-line classes with them. After, have them generate a transcript for you that credits you with all your service schooling.

By the time you've walked this far down the trail, you'll know if you want to continue or not.

I'd say, if you're going to be over 35 when you finish your Bachelor's, you've already waited too long ... unless you're planning on competing against other college grads for promotions (what a waste of life). Anyone who wants to judge you on how much time and money you wasted on today's course curriculum, is not someone I'd be seeking employment with. So, why bother. You're better than that!!



posted on Jun, 10 2020 @ 07:48 AM
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Some other things to think about:

1. If you are going this to further your career because you can't get advancement without the degree letters, if a company really, really wants you, they may help to fund part of the coursework so long as you stay on top of your grades. My husband is in that situation should he choose to pursue an advanced degree. He also has the added benefit that some of what he does professionally can be applied as research toward any thesis-style project he may choose to do.

2. My cousin's wife got a lot of her degree via correspondence/online. Depending on what your program is, you may not have to set foot on campus much at all. You might be able to get a good chunk of it accomplished that way.



posted on Jun, 10 2020 @ 08:58 AM
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a reply to: AutomateThis1

If you decide to go to a community college first make absolutely sure that it is one where your credits will transfer to a university- and don't just take their word for it, talk to whatever potential university you might go to down the road and ask THEM if credits from chosen community college will transfer to them.

You would be amazed by how many community colleges will lie about whether or not credits earned there will transfer to universities. You wouldn't want to have to spend more money and time re-taking classes you've already completed because the credits aren't accepted.



posted on Jun, 10 2020 @ 10:07 AM
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a reply to: AutomateThis1

Only way to know for sure is to research your local colleges.
You can visit them if you like. most let people tour.



posted on Jun, 10 2020 @ 10:53 AM
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Like Edumakated said, it really depends on what you're trying to accomplish.

So, in addition to Edumakated's questions, I would ask / clarify to the following:

1. Are you trying to get a degree? Does this matter to you? If yes, then why? For work? Different career?

2. If you're not trying to get a degree, but just want to learn some things, then why not audit the courses you wish to learn? This way you can dispense with all the BS gen ed classes and save a ton of money, and even more importantly, a ton of precious time.

I was listening to a really interesting Saturday talk radio program this past Saturday. It's a syndicated financial program which airs on Saturdays. This particular segment was about colleges, and the future in light of the whole Covid 19 thing. The projections are college revenues for the 2020/2021 school year are going to be off by 52% Most of the major universities have cancelled the 2020 school year, or will only be holding on-line courses (which most do not like). This coupled with the shut down of most of the major sports programs which bring in huge revenue adds up to the 52% or more.

The upshot for people like yourself (the OP) is, colleges and universities are going to be a lot more flexible than they have been in the past...which is a good thing. They said not to expect tuition to come down much, if at all, but otherwise it's kind of a 'buyer's market'.

Hope this helps.



posted on Jun, 10 2020 @ 01:54 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Most? If they've cancelled, then why are the BIG 12 and SEC holding on campus football practices this summer? I assume that means they're at least looking at a season?



posted on Jun, 10 2020 @ 02:30 PM
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Many years ago I did both, full time at each. Generally, students at the community colleges work and professors understand that. Professors at community colleges are there because they want to teach. Professors at the well known universities are there for research opportunities. My two years at the community college prepared me well for the last 4 semesters at the University.

Cost was a big factor in my decisions. I thought the community college professors cared more about the student and were more accessible. That was my impression. The atmosphere at the University was much different than the community college. University life can be overwhelming or you love it. Community college life you go to class then leave for the day. Quality of the education is about the same.



posted on Jun, 10 2020 @ 03:04 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Not all BIG 12, only one Oklahoma and that's voluntary

Cancelled was probably too strong, but nothing is certain at this point

Here's a pretty good run down as of Monday...

NCAA Run Down - ESPN



posted on Jun, 10 2020 @ 04:12 PM
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originally posted by: AutomateThis1

..........
1.
I guess a follow up question could be would it be easier to get better grades in a community college, thus making it easier to get into a better school? I always heard that the education received at community colleges was rather sub-par. Could be false, but again I don't know that's just what I've heard.

...........
2.
Say for instance I wanted to go to the Georgia Institute of Technology. I don't know if I could get into it just by applying. It's supposed to be a pretty nice school, and even though the admittance rate is higher than, IDK MIT for instance. I haven't stepped foot onto a campus for over a decade.

.............
3.
Or should I just stick with Middle Tennessee State University for the whole ride?

........
4.
Really the only reason I'm even considering going to college is to network and open up my career options, and maybe have an opportunity to work on some really cool projects.

.......

5. I've thought about going into a completely different career path, but I'm pretty settled on just continuing down the road I started on.



I've tried basically all these options in different combinations, over the years. I started at a junior college, transferred to a high quality state university for my first Bachelor's degree, went to a small private university and transferred to a medium quality state university for a second Bachelor's degree and then got into Stanford for my Masters and Doctorate level degrees. So, to answer your questions:

1. Yes, it will probably be easier to get into a junior college and then transfer to a 4 year university. As others here have pointed out, most professors at junior colleges are there to teach, not to do research. Two of the best professors I ever had were at junior college. Education at a junior college does not have to be subpar, but not all junior colleges are equal. I live and work around Silicon Valley, and we have some outstanding junior colleges that draw faculty from all of the high tech area. A 2 year degree from one of these will probably land you a starting job almost anywhere in the Valley. You have to shop around, don't take just any old junior college. You won't want to go to a school where you think everyone around you is a loser.

2. Georgia Tech would be a very good choice; I've worked with and hired Georgia Tech graduates over the years and they have a solid reputation. However, you're right, you might not be able to get in on the first try because you have been out of school for a while. Equally important is the possibility you may not be able to stay in, if you do get accepted. Going from zero to full speed university student overnight can be quite a shock. It actually takes some time to learn how to be a university student. If you stumble coming right out of the blocks and get some crappy grades, it can be hard to recover. It depends on how confident you are in your ability to come up to speed instantly. My experience has been that once you have successfully completed 2 years at any college with a reasonable reputation it is generally pretty easy to transfer as a junior to a 4 year school.

3. No, don't stick with MTSU for the whole ride. They have an acceptance rate of 94%. A degree from Georgia Tech or similar would open many more doors for you.

4. Going to a good university will allow you to do all of the above; network, open up options, and work on cool projects. However, you will still have to actually earn the degree in the process. It's not either or, it's both and.

5. Don't go to another career path unless you actively hate the one you're on and/or have suddenly become passionate about another one. In order to complete a 4 year degree, you're going to have to feel positive enough about the path you're on to convince yourself to put in the blood, sweat, and tears that will be necessary.



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