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State Killed 275k Jobs Over COVID-19, Sheriff Now Evicting Residents Who Can’t Pay

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posted on May, 23 2020 @ 12:08 AM
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See the link for the official notice of eviction. I wonder how this will work ? People are broke with no job and I assume many will have no family to flee to so how are they going to move their stuff out of their residence ? Talk about losing everything ! I am all for justice but I am having a hard time with kicking people in the head when they are down.

Now, as the inevitable effects of the government’s shutdown order crash the economy and force people to choose between eating and paying their rent, that same government is going to start kicking them out of their homes.

OK government and the fear of COVID did this


As banks and other large corporations across the country receive hundreds of billions in Federal money — ensuring a lifetime of debt for future generations — Joe Sixpack on Main Street, USA is told to kick rocks.

No one here is advocating for people to be able to squat and exploit this situation to get out of paying their house note or rent. However, that is not the case here. While grocery stores and fast food restaurants are hiring, other businesses are told they must operate at 25% capacity or remain closed entirely. This is hardly sustainable when it comes to maintaining a decent work force with substantial pay.

www.activistpost.com...




posted on May, 23 2020 @ 12:20 AM
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well when every one is late for rent who ARE they renting to .
But i dout its very many who are being evicted . more then likly the tenets were always late or failed to pay .
most landlord will work with tents as much as possible as good tenets are hard to find .


+1 more 
posted on May, 23 2020 @ 12:36 AM
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originally posted by: midnightstar
well when every one is late for rent who ARE they renting to .
But i dout its very many who are being evicted . more then likly the tenets were always late or failed to pay .
most landlord will work with tents as much as possible as good tenets are hard to find .


So you didn't comprehend the OP at all and didn't read the link.

/golfclap



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 12:51 AM
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Let's be honest here... while it is the government who is directly responsible for the unemployment and loss of income, it is not the government that is evicting tenants. It's the landlords. They are required by law to use the court to effect an eviction, which gives the tenant a chance to speak their case, and the court will then direct the Sheriff to remove evicted tenants to prevent physical violence.

Still, it would certainly behoove the government to declare that there would be no evictions until the crisis is over. Let's face it, while some landlords can be compassionate and will make arrangements to help tenants, others just want every penny they can get. That's actually why landlords have to go through a courtroom now to evict: to ensure that landlords are not abusing their tenants.

Of course, the amount of government involvement in the process doesn't stop there... there would be more consequences. Most rental units are financed and insured, so forcing landlords to do without rental income would mean they couldn't pay the loan and insurance on the property. Banks would then foreclose on the properties. In some places, insurance on rental properties is mandatory (so I have been told), so landlords would also be looking at fines on top of foreclosures they couldn't pay. Now, since the tenants cannot be evicted nor forced to pay up, the property then becomes a liability rather than an asset, and those foreclosures would cause another housing collapse as people were unable to sell property for any price.

The simple truth is that the economy cannot be tightly controlled, no matter how much we might want to control it. It's just too vast and too varied. Interfere with the free flow of money in one area and you affect a dozen others. The very concept that the government is big enough or powerful enough to take over the economy is laughable for anyone who has the slightest inkling of how it works.

We should have never shut down the economy. That was foolishness. We should have rallied to protect our most vulnerable and let it go at that. Now we have a double whammy: a rogue virus and a collapsing economy. That's what happens when the government gets too big and too corrupt.

My advice: buy popcorn. A lot of popcorn. It's cheap, still available, contains fiber and thus will decrease one's dependency on toilet paper, and it will make the ride more enjoyable.

'Cause we ain't seen nuthin' yet!

TheRedneck



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 01:26 AM
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SUE THEM!!!!!

START A MASS CLASS ACTION LAWSUIT!

If you file lawsuits ALL actions must come to a stop until the case is resolved. THAT COULD TAKE YEARS!!

FIGHT BACK!!

Or don't, and pick a nice shady underpass to build your cardboard condo and lament on better times.

Your choice folks.



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 01:30 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Most people in the Chicago area seem to be making good money from the Fed/State unemployment benefit, or still working.



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 02:05 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust
a reply to: 727Sky

Most people in the Chicago area seem to be making good money from the Fed/State unemployment benefit, or still working.



Not just Chicago but in several states the unemployment money received is more than holding down a full time job. People can stay home or go fishing and make more than clocking into a real time job.... can't blame them no matter if right or wrong.



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 02:51 AM
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They should chop some trees and build houses on the federal land. Either we are free or we're just numbers that need to pay to breathe



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 05:29 AM
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just a thought, some landlords aren't wall street rich. Some are trying like hell to hold on to two mortgages, and won't be able to with a renter not paying. None of that makes any of this fair, but before you scream about the mean evil landlords, remember, they are just like the renters when it comes to being hurt by this situation. Just a little perspective.



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 07:09 AM
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originally posted by: network dude
just a thought, some landlords aren't wall street rich. Some are trying like hell to hold on to two mortgages, and won't be able to with a renter not paying. None of that makes any of this fair, but before you scream about the mean evil landlords, remember, they are just like the renters when it comes to being hurt by this situation. Just a little perspective.


Part of the problem of housing is people using rentals as investments from the mom-and-pops types to wall street it lowers the available housing in the area and drives prices up which forces people into rentals and then drives rental rates up. Yes landlords are being hurt by it but who is being hurt more the landlord that could sale property to get by or the renter who has NOTHING if they get evicted?



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 08:09 AM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
Still, it would certainly behoove the government to declare that there would be no evictions until the crisis is over. Let's face it, while some landlords can be compassionate and will make arrangements to help tenants, others just want every penny they can get. That's actually why landlords have to go through a courtroom now to evict: to ensure that landlords are not abusing their tenants.

That's what the Portuguese government did, they suspended evictions for debts created after March (March not included). Besides that, tenants can get a special loan to pay their rents, with no interest, payable in 12 months, starting on January 2021 or on the month after the crisis ends. They need to show proof that their income was affected by this crisis.

That way landlords do not stop getting their money and people do not lose their homes.



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 08:23 AM
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a reply to: Pyle


Part of the problem of housing is people using rentals as investments

There is no situation I am aware of where a rental unit is not an investment. That's just the way things work. A tenant is using an expensive asset that belongs to someone else, by definition. There are always expenses that have to be covered, if not loan payments then interest, taxes, and upkeep.


Yes landlords are being hurt by it but who is being hurt more the landlord that could sale property to get by or the renter who has NOTHING if they get evicted?

Who would one sell the property to if a tenant cannot be evicted and is not paying rent? Who are these people who will pay a large sum of money for something they must then pay out more money on an ongoing basis on to keep up and still cannot use?

That's not how things work. Landlords are not all greedy, money-hoarding rich guys. Many are just people trying to make an honest buck by providing housing. Take away their possibility to profit (or in the situations we are talking about, to even break even) and there will be no rental property for people to live in.

TheRedneck



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 08:24 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust
a reply to: 727Sky

Most people in the Chicago area seem to be making good money from the Fed/State unemployment benefit, or still working.



This^^. While I don't necessarily agree with the way things have been handled, there are now a multitude of mechanisms that are allowing people who were working to get paid...sometimes more than they every were -- no waiting week, full salary unemployment (now through the end of the year I believe) even for self-employed. They basically let anyone and everyone qualify. The only group I know that got kind of hosed were the ones who just got hours cut back but weren't 'unemployed'.

If you aren't using that money to pay rent, I get it, there isn't much you can say about that.



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 08:25 AM
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originally posted by: [post=25187925]Pyle


Yes landlords are being hurt by it but who is being hurt more the landlord that could sale property to get by or the renter who has NOTHING if they get evicted?


Ummm, its a bit difficult to sell a rental occupied by a non-rent payer without deep deep discount probably below whats owed by landlord.

Such genius nowadays,




posted on May, 23 2020 @ 08:27 AM
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a reply to: ArMaP

That makes more sense than simply declaring that evictions are suspended. It keep the money flowing, albeit at the expense of the taxpayers. Unfortunately, I haven't heard that suggestion here; it seems any discussion centers around protecting tenants and leaving the landlords out in the cold.

TheRedneck



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 08:43 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

This might have been sustainable for a couple weeks, but it has gone on for far too long.

A couple of weeks would have been ample time for businesses to take the information and put rules in place, for people in every day life to take the information and figure out how to proceed in their life as seems best.

It also would have given us one incubation cycle, give or take, to have had some kind of idea what we were looking at to see how severe things might get.



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 08:46 AM
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a reply to: Halfswede

The problem I am seeing is that a lot of the complexes are reminding people that for the duration of the lockdowns at least, they aren't responsible to pay rent that month. They do remind them that the full rent will be due by the end of the crisis.

So how many people are choosing not to pay the rent at that time and will instead be hit by the full bill at the end of it all and not be able to pay because they simply made a bad decision?

And how many people fell through the cracks and didn't qualify for unemployment and genuinely couldn't pay and will be in the same boat with no money for rent ... or much of anything else by then?



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 08:52 AM
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I think we ain't seen nothing yet!
Watching stock channel this week and the reporter gal asked some finance dude ( no link, sorry) about why the market seems so stable and steady with all that's going on. He said remember no one's paid rent , mortgage, car notes, loans back in 2 months and most of those furloughed payments expire on June 1. That will be the time when we actually see the other shoe drop in the stock market, at least. Millions will be homeless overnight who rent. Millions will lose their homes they've worked hard to pay for overnight. Millions will lose cars they've been paying on for years overnight. That's when the real economic impact will be visible. Currently we are in a two month delay because of the furloughed payments. I hope some folks took their stimulus and +600 unemployment checks to keep the rent and mortgage as current as possible.



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 09:31 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko


So how many people are choosing not to pay the rent at that time and will instead be hit by the full bill at the end of it all and not be able to pay because they simply made a bad decision?

That's the real problem, and it's far from a new one.

Back in 2007, the government decided that poor minorities were being unfairly treated because they couldn't afford to own homes. So programs were implemented to make it easier for them to get first-time homeowner loans. It worked; more poor minorities were able to get loans to buy a home. but then the bills for those loans came due and the homeowners suddenly found themselves in foreclosure because they couldn't pay the mortgage payments. The banks didn't suffer... they came up with the bundling scheme and sold off the bad loans. They knew what was coming. The result was the Great Recession. Housing prices plummeted and the rest of the economy followed.

This is no different. Government has decided that it is too dangerous to work, so people shouldn't have to pay their bills until everything is sorted out. Those bills still exist, however; they're just being postponed. The banks won't get hurt; they'll come up with a way to profit. That's what they do. Those who are hurt are the average people who don't understand that they need to plan long term and instead try to live day to day.

I see it all the time. On the road, I see people who totally ignore anything more than 100 feet in front of them. They'll race up to that red light and give no thought to stopping until it enters their field of vision, then they'll stand on the brakes to stop just short of it. They just used extra fuel and saved nothing. I look as far ahead as I can see and try to time the lights. Most of the time, while the short-sighted are gunning their motor to start off from a dead stop, I just cruise through the light beside them and never lose my speed. In a few minutes they come flying by me again, and at the next light the situation repeats.

Stop and look around in the next convenience store... everything is higher priced there, because it is there for convenience. I know that, and I limit purchases there for that reason. If I don't need the product right now, I don't buy it there. But most people wander in talking on the cell phone, walk through the store never missing a word, grab whatever hits their fancy at the moment without knowing or caring the price, throw it on the counter along with a few "specialty" items from the counter displays, hand the clerk some money or swipe a card, and wander out... still on the phone and completely oblivious to anything they just did.

The average person lives for the moment. What happens in five minutes is none of their concern, much less what happens next month. I cannot count the number of times when I was younger and someone owed me a few bucks for something and would actually tell me that if I wanted the money I would have to catch them before they spent their check or wait until the next payday! I almost never got repaid from people like that (and quickly learned to never loan them anything). Now, if I ever hear something like that come out of someone's mouth, I refuse to loan them anything.

So what is happening now? "Hey, we got some extra money this month! Yay! And we don't have to pay rent this month either! Yay-yay! Let's go buy something!" That free ride is going to come crashing to an end real soon now, and the tone will change. "Back rent? I don't have it right now; catch me on payday (or when I get a job since mine disappeared)." Banks know about that trick better than I do; they aren't going to chase your spending habit all over time and space. They're going to foreclose and cut their losses, and landlords are going to evict and cut theirs.

And, as before, the economy will crash again and Trump will have to rebuild it again (and be criticized for doing so again). As before, the people who can't see more than 30 seconds ahead of themselves will be the ones hurt. And as before, they will blame whoever crosses their field of view instead of their own short-sightedness.

"sigh" Humans...

TheRedneck



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 10:01 AM
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originally posted by: Lumenari

So you didn't comprehend the OP at all and didn't read the link.

/golfclap



I have a hard time trusting any source with "activist" in their name.

In all fairness how many of these evictions were in process before the shutdown. In most areas you have to be at least 90 days behind in payments before eviction proceedings can even be started. I'll bet that these were in process before the shutdown and now the Courts are re-opening and processing these.



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