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Navy Ship Uses High Powered Laser To Shoot Down Drone During At Sea Test

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posted on May, 22 2020 @ 11:40 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Phage

That's what I was talking about. Lasers will make a decent counter tti the hypersonic threat. We can't ignore defense in favor of offense, or vice versa.


I see it as purely defensive since there's the horizon in the way.

Targeting, very problematic. Especially if it's coming in low and very, very hot like it would be. When that happens I guess you have to throw everything you've got. But what if there are a bunch of them (and there will be)? It only takes one.

Do we have a notion of the range of the latest super duper ship sinkers? Can China air launch them? Since they would seem to be the most likely threat at this time, even if they aren't really.



edit on 5/22/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 22 2020 @ 11:55 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
Do we have a notion of the range of the latest super duper ship sinkers? Can China air launch them? Since they would seem to be the most likely threat at this time, even if they aren't really.



Up to 1500 miles on some...but I read they are very vulnerable in the first stage for either scram jet or gliders as they need to get up to speed or altitude before they go to the hyper sonic mode.


edit on 22-5-2020 by Xtrozero because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 22 2020 @ 11:56 PM
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I remember watching a documentary about planes shooting down scud missiles in the gulf war with lasers. I remember the plane had a small half sphere at the front under the cockpit where the laser eminated from, and the entire fuselage was the mechanism. I also recall seeing the melted and warped missile post hit. I was shocked at the time, had to be at least 10 years ago, probably more...a reply to: StoolSample



posted on May, 22 2020 @ 11:57 PM
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originally posted by: BadBoYeed
I remember watching a documentary about planes shooting down scud missiles in the gulf war with lasers. I remember the plane had a small half sphere at the front under the cockpit where the laser eminated from, and the entire fuselage was the mechanism. I also recall seeing the melted and warped missile post hit. I was shocked at the time, had to be at least 10 years ago, probably more...a reply to: StoolSample



Think that was on a 135, had a friend on one of them...



posted on May, 22 2020 @ 11:58 PM
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a reply to: Phage

There currently is only one truly hypersonic ship killer that's even close to operational The newer missiles are HGVs, meaning thar they're going to fly a totally different profile. They're launched from a ballistic missile, so they'll start higher and dive down towards the target.



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 12:01 AM
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a reply to: BadBoYeed

They didn't have an operational airborne laser in either Gulf War. That's actually where the idea came from. The aircraft you're talking about was the YAL-1A. It successfully shot down several test missiles, but has since been scrapped.
edit on 5/23/2020 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 12:04 AM
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a reply to: Xtrozero

The ALL was never used operationally, and didn't have the power to drop a ballistic missile. Research with it did lead to development of the LAIRCM systems.
edit on 5/23/2020 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 12:10 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I figured. It's not easy to get something moving that fast.

Still, even a sunburn is very scary.



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 12:29 AM
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a reply to: Phage

The Navy got their hands on a number of instrumented copies of Kh-31 supersonic missiles designed to act as targets. Between them and the Coyote the SeaRAM got pretty damn good at hitting supersonic missiles.



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 12:34 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Yeah. But it just takes one.



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 12:38 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Of course it does. But the better the defense, the harder it is for that one.



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 03:23 AM
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originally posted by: TortoiseKweek
a reply to: shawmanfromny

I don't see it happening for a long time. That's not to say they don't already have something in place, but if they don't, I would look at Formula1 KERS style system.

If you can somehow regenerate the battery system for a lazer through the energy of the jet engines, you might be able to recharge that sucker for non stop combat? Me and my crazy ideas!


We got this,



Rolls-Royce has revealed the radical state-of-the-art jet engine that will power the UK's Tempest fighter plane when it enters service in 2035. Currently in its fifth year of development, the new engine will not only provide thrust for the supersonic warfighter but also unprecedented amounts of electricity to power future energy weapons and other systems.

...The problem is that the Tempest will be a very thirsty beast when it comes to electricity, producing unprecedented levels of power demand and thermal loads due to its carrying lasers and other energy weapons, advanced sensors and avionics, and swarming technologies. This means that the old engines that were made mainly to pump out thrust aren't up to the job.


Linky




posted on May, 23 2020 @ 05:26 AM
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I think this is a good first baby step but dont break out the champagne yet

First as a few pointed out it seemed to take a fair amount of time on target before it was destroyed.

I was not that long but long enough a fast , evading and/or shielded (be reflective or really tough skin) could have hit their target or released their payload.

remember they were shooting a a "drone"...
as with other military tests you can get a desired result depending on what the drone is and how its performing (ex going fast, doing evasive maneuvers, using/not using counter measures, ect).

but one thing I did notice was it was a straight wing prop powered drone..
you have to look closely but it is clearly seen.

with respect unless its say an observation type drone or a prop armed (like the predator) the test was NOT REAL WORLD situation.

the targets you be facing in most (if not all situations) will be fast moving missiles, evading jet aircraft (some with countermeasures to include armored for lazers) and heavily armed ships.

even small attack boats that could be more vulnerable you have to have (given the test) a set amount of time vs material to get "burn though" for damage stopping effect.

im sorry but test like this I remember seeing YEARS ago on the history channel

with respect and given the target not yet seeing it as an effective weapon.

not saying it does not hold potential but as long as they been working on this system I see a long way to go still.

scrounger



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 08:49 AM
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originally posted by: StoolSample
Isn't this old news? Like old as hell news?


Navy mounted 1st on board lasers in 2014. Old news...



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 09:47 AM
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a reply to: mysterioustranger

That was part of a different program, and was a different laser. The original laser, which was installed on the Ponce, was the Laser Weapons System(LaWS). It was a 30kW laser designed for low end threats. The laser on Portland is the Solid State Laser- Technology Demonstrator (SSL-TD). It took what was learned from LaWS, and was developed into a 150kW solid state laser.



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 10:30 AM
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When thinking about all this hypersonic technology, I just can't help but think about all the radar and detection systems these ships are going to need to detect these threats. There's going to be so much energy going through the air that you'll be able to shove a hotdog on a stick out a porthole for a few seconds and it will cook!

edit on 5/23/2020 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 11:35 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58

Of course it does. But the better the defense, the harder it is for that one.


I think it is most likely the first stage when they will be taken down the most. Initial launch awareness will be key with even a F-35 in place can take it down in that stage. The glider needs to get to like 90k before it transitions to the hyper speed stage, so maybe space defense, but that is a good amount of time for target acquisition either way.



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 11:40 AM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
When thinking about all this hypersonic technology, I just can't help but think about all the radar and detection systems these ships are going to need to detect these threats. There's going to be so much energy going through the air that you'll be able to shove a hotdog on a stick out a porthole for a few seconds and it will cook!


There is a cone shape above the decks that you do not go into, ever, with radar up. When we fly our drones on the ships they need to turn off the radar when we are 3 miles out, and to go out into that area for maintenance is kind of a big deal.



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 11:48 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58

The ALL was never used operationally, and didn't have the power to drop a ballistic missile. Research with it did lead to development of the LAIRCM systems.


Back in the 90s I use to see a 135 parked at Kirkland in a special spot with a ton of refrigerator units wrapping it, looked like liquid nitrogen was always leaking from it. That was back when I flew Primary Nuclear Airlift Force (PNAF) and so we would be parked relatively closer to it due to our cargo.

The one my friend use to fly on was mainly all civilians and it must have been testing..He told me stories of on board fires and such as the aircrew would freak out and the technicians in the back were like whatever...lol



posted on May, 23 2020 @ 11:53 AM
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The thing is with slapping a mega laser onto a plane you are going to need a hell of a lot of juice stored up in battery form and the replenishment of it is going to have to be fast as its not going to be much use with a once every 5 mins time.

Can remember seeing those chemical tanks that they had with one that was attached to a 747 i think and it was massive and only good for 30-40 shots before needing to be replaced and the stuff was highly toxic.

Just can't really see it making it to fighter level craft but more the cargo sized planes that are designed to handle the weight and putting an extra 20% in fuel carrying to cover the generation along with the very heavy duty wiring won't be a problem.



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