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Air Force cancels GE sole source engine contract

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posted on May, 20 2020 @ 01:37 AM
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The Air Force announced that they have canceled the sole source contract given to GE to supply engines for the F-15EX. The contract was initially awarded on the basis that the P&W F100 engine wasn't certified on the EX, while the GE F110 would be from the start. Pratt pushed back against the contract, and an RFP dropped May 15th for 461 engines, to begin delivery in 2023.


The US Air Force (USAF) is asking for engine proposals for its Boeing F-15EX programme, a few months after saying it would grant a sole-source award to GE Aviation for 480 F110 jet turbines.

The USAF received pushback on its sole-source plan from Pratt & Whitney (P&W). That company’s F100 engine powers the service’s fleet of legacy F-15C/D and E fighters.

www.flightglobal.com...




posted on May, 20 2020 @ 01:43 AM
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There's a very small handful of companies capable of fielding this order.

In all likelihood, based on that fact, GE will probably end up being the pick for it, again...

Sure, it's "open" but what, there's maybe 5 companies that could even approach the idea.

GE knows they can. Sure, another party maybe wanted to muscle their offer in, but is this really what's happening, or is the Air Force just trying to force a better deal out of GE to secure the deal?

I think it's just a ploy to try and get the offer down.

But what the hell do I know?
edit on 20-5-2020 by Archivalist because: meh



posted on May, 20 2020 @ 02:03 AM
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a reply to: Archivalist

It keeps Pratt happy. If they go with GE again, then they can say it was a fair and open competition, but they lost on merits.



posted on May, 20 2020 @ 03:06 AM
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This is the problem with military contracts ..it gies to the one who whines the loudest.



posted on May, 20 2020 @ 05:38 AM
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originally posted by: lakenheath24
This is the problem with military contracts ..it gies to the one who whines the loudest.


Not just military, but with all Government contracts. Basically boils down to who spends the most on lobbyists.



posted on May, 20 2020 @ 10:07 AM
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I often wonder about GE in general. Over many years I have read how they are one of those companies with so many back doors into the Fed's that they get sweetheart deals that no other company could ever hope to receive. A bit off topic, but this is a conspiracy site.



posted on May, 20 2020 @ 03:18 PM
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originally posted by: Fools
I often wonder about GE in general. Over many years I have read how they are one of those companies with so many back doors into the Fed's that they get sweetheart deals that no other company could ever hope to receive. A bit off topic, but this is a conspiracy site.


A lot of those Pentagon doors, back or front, open because GE makes really good turbines. And they are responsive. When we all complained about the huge smoke trails left by the J-79, GE went to work and developed the dash 17C and E variants which were much better. The company I fly for now has 747-400s with engines from GE (CF-6), Pratt PW4056), and Rolls-Royce (RB211). I much prefer the GE. Early 20 series Learjets used GE engines. Later series went to Garretts and suffered more reliability problems , at least with the companies I flew for. The GE powered Lear 24 was a little rocketship. The GE CJ-610 engines produced 2950 pounds of thrust each and the empty weight of the aircraft was only 7000 pounds.



posted on May, 21 2020 @ 07:05 PM
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a reply to: F4guy

One other thing I forgot. GE was making jet engines for the Air Force even before there was an Air Force. In the mid-40s they built the J-31 to power the P-59A, which was our first jet fighter. That engine led to the development of the I-40/J33 which powered the P(F)-80 Shooting Star, the first operational jet fighter in the USAF inventory. So GE has a history of producing jet engines that is longer than the history of the USAF, which began in 1947.



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