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I am going too the store, to

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posted on May, 19 2020 @ 09:37 PM
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How stupid is the title for this thread? I bet 3/4 of you don't get it. Here is how I know....

It seems everyday, most posts get the use of to and too....which equals fore btw....wrong. the following are examples of proper usage of each word.

I am going TO the store.

My wife is going TOO.

We had TO wait in line TO get in because the store can not have TOO many people in it. It seems that many Americans piss themselves when someone coughs in public nowadays. This leaves the store extra space TO mop the floor before we get in.




posted on May, 19 2020 @ 09:42 PM
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originally posted by: theatreboy
How stupid is the title for this thread? I bet 3/4 of you don't get it. Here is how I know....

It seems everyday, most posts get the use of to and too....which equals fore btw....wrong. the following are examples of proper usage of each word.

I am going TO the store.

My wife is going TOO.

We had TO wait in line TO get in because the store can not have TOO many people in it. It seems that many Americans piss themselves when someone coughs in public nowadays. This leaves the store extra space TO mop the floor before we get in.


My odd issue is that for the last ten years almost nobody online seems to know the difference between "loose" and "lose".

"He's going too loose the election" seems perfectly OK now, for instance.




edit on 19-5-2020 by Lumenari because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 19 2020 @ 09:43 PM
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a reply to: theatreboy

I'm going two the store also.



posted on May, 19 2020 @ 09:49 PM
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originally posted by: Lumenari

originally posted by: theatreboy
How stupid is the title for this thread? I bet 3/4 of you don't get it. Here is how I know....

It seems everyday, most posts get the use of to and too....which equals fore btw....wrong. the following are examples of proper usage of each word.

I am going TO the store.

My wife is going TOO.

We had TO wait in line TO get in because the store can not have TOO many people in it. It seems that many Americans piss themselves when someone coughs in public nowadays. This leaves the store extra space TO mop the floor before we get in.


My odd issue is that for the last ten years almost nobody online seems to know the difference between "loose" and "lose".

"He's going too loose the election" seems perfectly OK now, for instance.





I so that, TOO. Makes one wonder how many bots are on ATS.


edit on 19-5-2020 by theatreboy because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 19 2020 @ 09:52 PM
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a reply to: theatreboy

Are you ever going “to” get “to” the point?



posted on May, 19 2020 @ 10:06 PM
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a reply to: theatreboy

Your complaint has peaked my interest!



And damn when you get to the store you have to wait in that long cue!



I may have better language skills than most, but I try not to take it for granite.







edit on 19-5-2020 by DietWoke because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 19 2020 @ 10:09 PM
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a reply to: theatreboy

Can we add your and you're to the list?

YOUR friend is silly, but YOU'RE not.

Also there, their, and they're.

THERE is THEIR house and THEY'RE home!


edit on 5/19/2020 by new_here because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 19 2020 @ 10:12 PM
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originally posted by: new_here
a reply to: theatreboy

Can we add your and you're to the list?

YOUR friend is silly, but YOU'RE not.

Also there, their, and they're.

THERE is THEIR house and THEY'RE home!



Added!

I guess I just don't get what is so hard about all of these words. They are basic (American)English. I knew the difference by 2nd grade.



posted on May, 19 2020 @ 10:18 PM
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originally posted by: theatreboy

originally posted by: new_here
a reply to: theatreboy

Can we add your and you're to the list?

YOUR friend is silly, but YOU'RE not.

Also there, their, and they're.

THERE is THEIR house and THEY'RE home!



Added!

I guess I just don't get what is so hard about all of these words. They are basic (American)English. I knew the difference by 2nd grade.


Agreed!
Another: its and it's

ITS light is so bright that IT'S blinding!



posted on May, 19 2020 @ 10:20 PM
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originally posted by: new_here

originally posted by: theatreboy

originally posted by: new_here
a reply to: theatreboy


Can we add your and you're to the list?

YOUR friend is silly, but YOU'RE not.

Also there, their, and they're.

THERE is THEIR house and THEY'RE home!



Added!

I guess I just don't get what is so hard about all of these words. They are basic (American)English. I knew the difference by 2nd grade.


Agreed!
Another: its and it's

ITS light is so bright that IT'S blinding!


Weird how that apostrophe changes possession...



posted on May, 19 2020 @ 10:21 PM
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How about how inhale did that happen?



posted on May, 19 2020 @ 10:40 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari

Oh my that is so my pet peeve. So misspelled all the time it drives me nuts.

While were at it, why do people use two or three periods at the end of a sentence? I can't read that gobbldeygook.



posted on May, 19 2020 @ 10:48 PM
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originally posted by: TheSpanishArcher
a reply to: Lumenari

Oh my that is so my pet peeve. So misspelled all the time it drives me nuts.

While were at it, why do people use two or three periods at the end of a sentence? I can't read that gobbldeygook.


I do that all the time...

It just means a pause instead of a full stop.

In my native language, punctuation isn't about the vocal tone (.?!) but the time between the words or sentences.

My issue is the English language itself, in some cases.

For instance the rule "I before E except after C" except for a few words where we don't do that and it's not really a rule and we don't really know, just use a spell checker....

What kind of language does that?



edit on 19-5-2020 by Lumenari because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 19 2020 @ 10:58 PM
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At least you didn't use a 's to signify plural
Goth REALLY, REALLY dislikes that...



posted on May, 19 2020 @ 11:03 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari

You misunderstood. I was talking about people who put multiple periods at the end of EVERY sentence. I just cannot read that. My eyes hurt when I see that and I have to scroll right past it.

Dramatic effect I get but stuff like that bothers me.



posted on May, 19 2020 @ 11:04 PM
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How about basic use of apostrophes and the formation of plurals?



posted on May, 19 2020 @ 11:07 PM
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originally posted by: TheSpanishArcher
a reply to: Lumenari

You misunderstood. I was talking about people who put multiple periods at the end of EVERY sentence. I just cannot read that. My eyes hurt when I see that and I have to scroll right past it.

Dramatic effect I get but stuff like that bothers me.


Oh!

Sorry, I get what you are saying.

Much like a person that when they talk just crop sprays "like" or "you know" in between every few words.




posted on May, 19 2020 @ 11:20 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari

Like and You Know are so hard to avoid in real life conversation but I've worked hard at it over the last few years and knocked it down pretty well. Kinda proud of myself for that as it's not easy. They are so overused by everyone that it's ingrained.



posted on May, 19 2020 @ 11:23 PM
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Yeah. Good examples have been mentioned, about grammar.

What has bothered me a little bit, is using the phrase "I could care less" when the intention is to say that i don't care.

The way i see it: if you could care less, then there is some amount of caring, because a lesser amount is possible. If you couldn't care less about this post, then the amount of caring is zero.

I decided to check Merriam-Webster before making myself stupid. And now i am stupid.

"What to Know
Merriam-Webster treats the phrases couldn't care less and could care less as synonymous, both meaning "not concerned or interested at all." "Couldn't care less" is the older and more obvious phrase grammatically, but it has been confused for so long that both are now defined."



edit on 19-5-2020 by Finspiracy because: typo



posted on May, 20 2020 @ 01:31 AM
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nvm
edit on 5/20/2020 by japhrimu because: (no reason given)



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