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Pot Roast

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posted on May, 17 2020 @ 06:53 PM
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Now, I really like Pot Roast. Sorry, but I do.

It's a crummy cut of meat, which if prepared properly is absolutely out of this world!

I usually make mine with a couple cut up potatoes, some carrots and some onion. Add some beef broth, spices...and really anything else you want (except liquorice or M&M's...don't ask me why I know this!!)

Anyway, pot roast is one of the best things you can eat on a budget! Actually, it's even better than that! Done properly, it's fabulous!

So, tonight, the "Jack Incident" is finally over, and I am relieved beyond imagination. It wasn't just about getting the bull back, but all the stuff which happened afterwards (i.e. the corrals, the prep, the moving of animals, the separations, the calves, the mommas)....that whole experience was a world-rocker!! Seriously, and no joke. We had to build fences, build new corrals, move hay, herd animals...it was NOT pretty! This was probably one of the most "unpleasant" experiences we've ever had!

But, when I walked inside tonight, there was a pot roast...complete with some taters and some carrots, and some wonderfully done beef pot roast.

Been out in the sun for days, so I fit the "redneck" bill (not the moderator, never that), but a wonderful dinner tonight!

Never underestimate a "pot roast"!!
edit on 5/17/2020 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 17 2020 @ 07:03 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

You know, I have mixed feelings about pot roast. It was a regular meal when I was a kid, and usually a one dish meal at that, what with the meat, potatoes, carrots, and onion, and when cooked right—slowly—the meat is pretty damn good, fall apart good, especially with some Texas Pete or Cholula.

I just never got into the potatoes/carrots/onions cooked that way, even though I love all three of those cooked different, which I think is my primary aversion to "pot roast" as it is typically known.

Glad you had a good meal waiting after some long and hard days though.

I grilled some teriyaki ginger chicken breasts last night and had some grilled Italian marinated squash/zucchini/bell pepper kabobs, but tonight it's a gyro, spanikopita, and Greek salad from the local Greek joint.
edit on 17-5-2020 by Liquesence because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 17 2020 @ 07:04 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Potatoes, onions, carrots covered with a bit of olive oil and salt/pepper/garlic slow roasted in the oven for 90 minutes at 300F.

Pot roast in the crock pot with 2 cans of French Onion soup and 2 cups of water for 6 hours.

Sour cream with horseradish for a topper.



My personal favorite.



posted on May, 17 2020 @ 07:09 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

I really like potato wedges roasted in the oven until slightly browned and crispy with salt and pepper and a horseradish dipping sauce.

That horseradish also sounds good as a topper for a roast, too.



posted on May, 17 2020 @ 07:15 PM
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My sister just did a pot roast for Mother's day we had Mom's one of a kind mashed potatoes, slow-cooked green beans homemade gravy and rolls and it was the best dinner since this stuff started, even better cause most of my family made it.



posted on May, 17 2020 @ 07:29 PM
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My wife pulls the potatoes and mashes them with heavy cream, butter and some fresh horseradish. They're off the rails, good!! The carrots I just like, any way, any time! The onions are just for flavor, usually only one, cut in half...and then the spices.

Serve the 'sauce' over the mashed taters (with butter, S&P), wife give me all the carrots (she hate's 'em) and the beef all around...Pure NIRVANA!!



posted on May, 17 2020 @ 07:32 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Nothing beats slow pot roasted meat, but for vegetables, nah.

I still prefer proper roasted baked potatoes, (slightly) honeyed carrots and mashed pumpkin with a tablespoon of molasses and a dollop of sour cream, and fresh asparagus done in butter and lemon water.

And the gravy! Always go for a thick non-packet real stock gravy with not too much cornflour, a splash of red wine in it, and reduced 'till it's perfect.



edit on 17/5/2020 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 17 2020 @ 07:37 PM
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I like it made into carnitas



posted on May, 17 2020 @ 07:38 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut


And the gravy! Always go for a thick non-packet real stock gravy with a splash of red wine in it and reduced 'till it's perfect.


I've been using bone broths for my gravy. I have been making batches and freezing it in small containers for easy portioning when I cook.

the beauty is it even puts the fat on top which I can skim before thawing.... I use the fat to start some garlic or other aromatics before adding in the broth and thickening agents.



posted on May, 17 2020 @ 07:40 PM
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I love a pot roast too. My go-to is a Mississippi Mud roast. It's about as simple of a recipe you'll ever find and works for just about any type of meat out there. I highly recommend it.



posted on May, 17 2020 @ 07:40 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Hmm, when I mash taters I definitely use heavy cream and butter, but never thought of horseradish. Fresh garlic and cheese also go well in them.




Serve the 'sauce' over the mashed taters (with butter, S&P), wife give me all the carrots (she hate's 'em) and the beef all around...Pure NIRVANA!!


Maybe I'm Dumb, but that sounds fantastic. All Apologies.
edit on 17-5-2020 by Liquesence because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 17 2020 @ 07:41 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut


d fresh asparagus done in butter and lemon water.


My go-to asparagus is easy: sprayed with olive oil, sprinkled with S&P and Italian seasoning (basil/oregano/parsley), roasted for about 10, then sprinkled with Parmesan. This works for a variety of veggies.



And the gravy! Always go for a thick non-packet real stock gravy with not too much cornflour, a splash of red wine in it, and reduced 'till it's perfect.


I have this red-wine and mushroom gravy recipe that I make with Salisbury steak....It. Is. Divine.
edit on 17-5-2020 by Liquesence because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 17 2020 @ 07:42 PM
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a reply to: Liquesence

You should try cream cheese and taters.

Totally different flavor profile.



posted on May, 17 2020 @ 07:43 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Prepared how, mashed together, as a wedge dip, or what?



posted on May, 17 2020 @ 07:45 PM
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originally posted by: Liquesence
a reply to: DBCowboy

Prepared how, mashed together, as a wedge dip, or what?


Mashed together.

I also add pearl onions to my mashed. But that's just me.



posted on May, 17 2020 @ 07:51 PM
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A side note, if you're going to add pearl onions to your mashed, make your mashed a little "dry" because the onions add moisture and you don't want soggy potatoes.

Speaking from experience.



posted on May, 17 2020 @ 07:53 PM
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Pot roast with potatoes, carrots, and onions is one of my favorite of all dinners. We usually use our chuck roasts for making that. We like the chucks and chuck arm roasts the best, I give the rolled rump and sirloin tips to the daughters and granddaughters as part of their Christmas gift.

I like the chuck roasts the best off of beef. The short ribs and soup bones are all made into soups. The marrow bones are great for making bone broth for the french onion or minnistrone soups.

When we make those pot roasts, we save the juice and have roast beef sandwiches dunked into the hot broth, ajus style.
edit on 17-5-2020 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 17 2020 @ 07:53 PM
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originally posted by: CriticalStinker
a reply to: chr0naut


And the gravy! Always go for a thick non-packet real stock gravy with a splash of red wine in it and reduced 'till it's perfect.


I've been using bone broths for my gravy. I have been making batches and freezing it in small containers for easy portioning when I cook.

the beauty is it even puts the fat on top which I can skim before thawing.... I use the fat to start some garlic or other aromatics before adding in the broth and thickening agents.


That sounds like heaven!




posted on May, 17 2020 @ 07:55 PM
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originally posted by: Liquesence
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Hmm, when I mash taters I definitely use heavy cream and butter, but never thought of horseradish. Fresh garlic and cheese also go well in them.




Serve the 'sauce' over the mashed taters (with butter, S&P), wife give me all the carrots (she hate's 'em) and the beef all around...Pure NIRVANA!!


Maybe I'm Dumb, but that sounds fantastic. All Apologies.


Mom usually makes enough that we have leftovers that we put with cheese and onions in a ramekin add some bacon bits baked for a little and have baked stuffed potatoes with out the skin so good.

Nothing special in her mash potatoes except a little mayo butter salt and pepper, she does whip the hell out of them LOL
but the hold up well we have even added onions and done potatoes pancakes the morning after.



posted on May, 17 2020 @ 07:59 PM
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originally posted by: Liquesence
a reply to: chr0naut


d fresh asparagus done in butter and lemon water.


My go-to asparagus is easy: sprayed with olive oil, sprinkled with S&P and Italian seasoning (basil/oregano/parsley), roasted for about 10, then sprinkled with Parmesan. This works for a variety of veggies.



And the gravy! Always go for a thick non-packet real stock gravy with not too much cornflour, a splash of red wine in it, and reduced 'till it's perfect.


I have this red-wine and mushroom gravy recipe that I make with Salisbury steak....It. Is. Divine.


I love mushrooms too. But I've been overdoing them a bit of late (we collected a stack of them fresh from the shaded 'foresty' bit at the back of the farm), so I was going light on them at the moment.




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