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Watch The Water

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posted on Apr, 8 2020 @ 10:23 PM
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Watch The Water

I’ve been giving some thought to the quick and steely transmission of the coronavirus. Some disease experts have expressed confusion by the virus’ patterns, and I’ve seen those patterns referred to in articles as “stealth transmission,” and “suspicious pattern.”

I wondered if the virus could be intentionally spread through water. And after some research, I have learned that flu viruses can indeed survive a watery environment.

There are many articles on it, but I found one—by the WHO, on water systems and the avian flu—-particularly interesting. They submit in the article that it is theoretically possible for the flu to be transmitted through drinking water. Science Daily uses the term “unlikely” in an article.

But government agencies (like the Dept. of Homeland Security) have given quite a lot of thought to bio-terrorism and the public drinking supply. In 2005, Volume 26 of The Annual Review of Public Health wrote a full treatise on THE PUBLIC HEALTH CHALLENGE OF WATER TERRORISM.

In the article, they indicate that medical and public health practitioners should maintain a high level of suspicion for certain types of syndromes or clusters of disease in their patient populations which may indicate possible biowarfare using public water as an exposure route. They list several arrays of symptoms, including upper and lower respiratory disease with fever and sudden death of previously healthy patients.

“There is growing concern that biological warfare agents may be used against the U.S. civilian population, with water as one possible vehicle of transmission or mode of dispersal of weaponized compounds,” according to the article.

This points to the idea that bioterrorism through water is plausible enough that it has been taken note of by government agencies, especially in the wake of 9/11.

Watch The Water, QAnon said.

Certainly a hard theory to prove, but interesting to think about.

It stands to reason that water treatment and chlorination of water would kill viruses, but is there a way to access the water once the water passes through treatment plants?




posted on Apr, 8 2020 @ 10:32 PM
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a reply to: MRuss

Nope, you are good!

3 generations before me of hypochondriacs. Mom still pushes the sh!t till’ this day.

She’s thrilled with QUARANTINE! Makes her feel normal... somehow.

Sister, you will live and thrive — FAR past this covid-crap! 🍻

Don’t buy the hype.



posted on Apr, 8 2020 @ 10:33 PM
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a reply to: MRuss

it's been suggested that in china at least one woman passed the virus through the plumbing in building infecting another 10 floors down.



On Tuesday (Feb. 11), officials said they had evacuated and quarantined more than 100 residents of an apartment building in Hong Kong's Tsing Yi area after a 62-year-old woman became the second person in the building to catch the new viral disease, now called COVID-19 (short for coronavirus disease 2019). She lived 10 floors below the first infected resident, raising the question of whether the virus could spread through the building infrastructure, such as through a pipe, The New York Times reported. Officials also found an unsealed pipe in the woman's bathroom.





Here's how that could happen: Typically, bathroom drains have a U-shaped trap that prevents fluids and odors from coming back up, but at Amoy Gardens, officials found that air would flow backward through the drains under certain circumstances, according to a Washington Post article published during the 2003 outbreak.

"When the bathroom was in use, with the door closed and the exhaust fan switched on, there could be negative pressure to extract contaminated droplets into the bathroom," Yeoh Eng-kiong, Hong Kong's secretary for health, welfare and food, said at the time, according to the Washington Post. "Contaminated droplets could then have been deposited on various surfaces such as floor mats, towels, toiletries and other bathroom equipment."


Can the new coronavirus spread through building pipes?



posted on Apr, 8 2020 @ 10:37 PM
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a reply to: hounddoghowlie

Yes, I remember this, and I thank you for pointing it out again. It certainly lends to the theory.



posted on Apr, 8 2020 @ 10:51 PM
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a reply to: MRuss


but is there a way to access the water once the water passes through treatment plants?


i'm gonna say mostly no, but there are ways that a valve maybe in the waterline that allows a suction to pull other liquids in.

there can be instances where say a fire truck connects to a hydrant and pulls water out of lines running to other buildings or homes. anything connected to these lines can be sucked in.

here in fl there is a law that requires backflow preventers on all home waterlines after a certain date and just about all commercial buildings


edit on 8-4-2020 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 8 2020 @ 10:59 PM
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a reply to: MRuss

I think that if your drinking the city water. Your likely in more danger from drinking that stuff then from anything else. Its been regurgitated and re regurgitated and treated and re-treated so many times by the time it reaches your tap. That who knows what in there.

How many people do you know actually drink tap water now a days on regular basis? Around here its mostly for cooking or tea. And if you drink well water and tap water, you can taste the difference. The taste alone may kill you, no viruses need apply.



posted on Apr, 8 2020 @ 11:11 PM
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a reply to: galadofwarthethird

we got what we call city water, but it is actually well water. most if not all of the tap water in my area is. it still has to be treated.
home wells don't have to, and don't fall under the state and federal epa laws. it is possible that your well water can become contaminated from any number of sources and you would never know it.

plus it is a well known fact that 50% or better bottled water. comes from a tap.



edit on 8-4-2020 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 8 2020 @ 11:29 PM
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a reply to: galadofwarthethird

That is Actually wrong. I Worked on water mains for three years. I have been in the Jardine water plant More times than I care to remember. I know they get the water from Lake Michigan. Also did a lot of work in central Illinois they got their water from the Kankakee River.

None of the water I’ve ever seen has been regurgitated
edit on 8-4-2020 by Aallanon because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 8 2020 @ 11:48 PM
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a reply to: Aallanon

Is it possible to access the water after it’s been treated?



posted on Apr, 8 2020 @ 11:56 PM
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a reply to: MRuss

Links would have been helpful.



posted on Apr, 9 2020 @ 12:24 AM
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a reply to: Aallanon
ya. Depends on were your at or a bunch of other things.

Do you speak for all the water out there in every city on every block out there? Maybe regurgitated is the wrong word, but then again. Even running pipes for long stretches is not something that can be done without grime and things building up, even on clean water from lakes or rivers. Heck even water pumped from 20 feet from your house on wells is not without a lot of maintenance to keep it clean over short periods of time.

So, regurgitated OK. But recycled sounds better either way. Do you drink the tap water? And would you do it every single day? I have seen more people flush all kids of crap down the drain, all of it ends up somewhere eventually and gets recycled and reused. And with giant populations of most cities? That there to keep the water supply and clean and without contaminants. Is just a pipe dream, and something you all can not achieve.



posted on Apr, 9 2020 @ 12:27 AM
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originally posted by: MRuss
a reply to: Aallanon

Is it possible to access the water after it’s been treated?


You access it at a tap. As another poster already said it can be siphoned back into the system, but Group A water systems require backflow prevention on all connections. Newer homes usually have a double check valve at the connection. That can mean an apartment building shares one connection. Back siphoning could happen and spread contaminants in that system.

Group A water systems also have to maintain constant pressure to prevent groundwater or sewage infiltration. I think the minimum is 15 or 20 psi. If it dips below that they're required to issue a boil water notice and do bacteriological testing with 2 consecutive negative tests with 24 hours between tests.

The main threat to water systems is at the source and they're required to have some barriers in place, but out water supply is certainly vulnerable to bioterror or contamination. Using an indicator like E.coli tells you If there is fecal contaminations, but obviously other contaminants go undetected. Even during broad testing there are plenty of contaminants that would never be detected.



posted on Apr, 9 2020 @ 12:39 AM
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a reply to: MRuss

This is from the Surfridrr foundation. Suggesting that the virus could get into to recreational waters and they are not sure about saltwater.

I looked this up after I hear about the paddles boarder in California That got arrested
Surfrider Foundation


The virus has been shown to remain viable and infectious, at least temporarily, in natural freshwater environments including lakes and streams. While dilution is suspected to keep the risk low, high concentrations of the viable COVID-19 virus could put freshwater recreation users at risk. There is still no information on the ability of the COVID-19 virus to remain viable in saltwater, so it’s unclear if swimming at saltwater beaches elevates the risk of contracting COVID-19. However, communal spread is a serious issue so spending time at popular beaches, if in close contact to other beachgoers, will increase your risk.


Gonna be a rough summer. - might they be planning close the beaches, rivers and lakes.
edit on 9-4-2020 by Observationalist because: (no reason given)

edit on 9-4-2020 by Observationalist because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2020 @ 01:43 AM
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a reply to: hounddoghowlie




plus it is a well known fact that 50% or better bottled water. comes from a tap.





Any sources to back that up?



posted on Apr, 9 2020 @ 01:52 AM
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originally posted by: Wide-Eyes
a reply to: hounddoghowlie




plus it is a well known fact that 50% or better bottled water. comes from a tap.





Any sources to back that up?


Have you seriously never looked at the source info on any given bottle of water?? You'd be damn amazed at how many name brands are just repackaged municipal water.

List of search returns here for search criteria "which brands of bottled water are actually tap water".



posted on Apr, 9 2020 @ 09:51 AM
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a reply to: MRuss

A lipid fat shell protecting a live bacteria means it can use fluidic conduits of travel.Maybe live in animal saliva or body fluid or and be passed on .
edit on 9-4-2020 by one4all because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2020 @ 09:53 AM
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originally posted by: galadofwarthethird
a reply to: MRuss

I think that if your drinking the city water. Your likely in more danger from drinking that stuff then from anything else. Its been regurgitated and re regurgitated and treated and re-treated so many times by the time it reaches your tap. That who knows what in there.

How many people do you know actually drink tap water now a days on regular basis? Around here its mostly for cooking or tea. And if you drink well water and tap water, you can taste the difference. The taste alone may kill you, no viruses need apply.


Maybe an ingredient added to the water to "sanitise it" breaks down into chemicals sympathetic to this bugs survival in some ways?Thats what Dr.Hulda Clark discovered is possible on a Global scale.



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