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Seems to me that warm weather is starting to "win".

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posted on Apr, 2 2020 @ 04:00 PM
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So I have been following this link to check new patients for the virus and so on. Seems to me that as weather warms up that cases fall. I think (of course) that this is a good thing. There seems to be variables due to population and incubation time of the virus, but it seems pretty clear looking at the stats that warmer temps are going to give us a break and some time to figure this out.


www.worldometers.info...
edit on 2-4-2020 by Fools because: ...




posted on Apr, 2 2020 @ 04:05 PM
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So since winter is coming , is this an attack on the Southern Hemisphere ?

It is where most of the 3rd world is...

Rich getting richer, the poor get the picture.

Gets below zero here is Australia, even is sunny Queensland.

Africa suffers single digits during winter.


edit on 2/4/2020 by scubagravy because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 2 2020 @ 04:15 PM
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a reply to: Fools

Chech Africa and South America where temperatures are 30 C and corona positive are on the rise.

Temperatures do not slow are speed up infections. It is contact with infected people and infected surfaces.



posted on Apr, 2 2020 @ 04:16 PM
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originally posted by: scubagravy
So since winter is coming , is this an attack on the Southern Hemisphere ?

It is where most of the 3rd world is...

Rich getting richer, the poor get the picture.


Nah, generally speaking (from what I understand researching) virus's in general do not like heat or humidity. An oddity seems that this particular one seems to be able be treated by malaria medicines.



posted on Apr, 2 2020 @ 04:21 PM
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a reply to: DeathSlayer

You obviously didn’t pay attention in biology.
A little advanced for some but informative



posted on Apr, 2 2020 @ 04:24 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Apr, 2 2020 @ 04:28 PM
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a reply to: DeathSlayer




Temperatures do not slow are speed up infections. It is contact with infected people and infected surfaces.


You can check Africa or any where if you aren't there you don't know squat.


(post by DeathSlayer removed for a manners violation)

posted on Apr, 2 2020 @ 04:33 PM
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a reply to: Fools

The spread should decrease in the summer in areas where it is humid. My understanding is that humidity causes the virus droplets to fall to the ground quicker rather than staying suspended in the air. There is also the fact that in the winter the heaters cause hot air to rise and the droplets stay suspended longer. With cool air conditioning the cold air should push the virus down faster even if the humidity inside is lower than outside.

Looking at the worldometer you can see the trend towards humid and warm vs cold vs dry.



posted on Apr, 2 2020 @ 04:41 PM
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a reply to: SeektoUnderstand

From your article....
Increase in temperature may not always kill off the virus?

Our results show no evolutionary tradeoff in thermal adaptation, in agreement with many experimental studies. Several authors (1,3,4,6,8,9) have shown that bacteria and viruses that have adapted to elevated environmental temperatures acquire fitness superior to that of strains that have been growing at the original temperature for an extended period of time, even when they are competing in the same original thermal environment.

viruses, whose generation time may be as short as a couple of hours, can adapt to a novel thermal environment on timescales from several days to a few months. Thus, according to our model, fever might not always be the most effective mechanism to fight certain viral infections



posted on Apr, 2 2020 @ 04:42 PM
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a reply to: SeektoUnderstand

I will remind you in June and then let's see what excuse you have.



posted on Apr, 2 2020 @ 04:45 PM
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I didn’t say it would kill it; however it plays a huge role in evolution. I’m general viruses prefer colder temps. Just spreading some knowledge



posted on Apr, 2 2020 @ 04:45 PM
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a reply to: Identified

Bingo.



posted on Apr, 2 2020 @ 05:07 PM
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Viruses seem to thrive at about 98.6 °F. Heat has nothing to do with it. UV rays and humidity, yes. Not heat. And how do you gather that the spread is slowing down??? Are you following the same Worldometer that I am? Over 1/10th of our confirmed cases are from today.



posted on Apr, 2 2020 @ 05:16 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Apr, 2 2020 @ 05:29 PM
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The only thing warmer weather does is shorten the lifespan of the virus on inanimate objects. Incubation period of an infected person and person to person transmission is unchanged. So, yes it does help but I don't think it will be the lifeboat some people are looking for. Time will have to sort that one out.



posted on Apr, 2 2020 @ 05:42 PM
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This expert has been saying this all along since mid February

www.accuweather.com...

Coronavirus expert says he knows when the virus 'will burn itself out,' according to leaked analysis
By Mark Puleo, AccuWeather staff writer

Published Feb. 11, 2020 3:48 PM

www.accuweather.com... -us/707057


Research into the possible effects of heat, humidity and population density on the transmission of the new coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) has led to the theory that warmer weather during spring and summer in the Northern Hemisphere may lead to a decline in the rate of spread of COVID-19, the illness it causes, but there is a range of opinions on the matter in the infectious disease community.

The effect of the sun’s ultraviolet rays may play a larger role than even heat and humidity. As the latest data is analyzed regarding the possible role that weather and climate factors may play in the rate of spread of COVID-19 continues, it may provide some new clues for what to expect in the United States as summer approaches. In particular, a look at the per capita infection rates of Iceland and Australia might possibly offer a glimpse at UV’s possible impact on the spread of COVID-19 around the world.

As of Tuesday, Iceland has among the world's highest rates of confirmed coronavirus cases per capita at 0.177 percent, with 648 cases from a population of 364,260. Australia’s confirmed infected rate is just 0.0083 percent – 2,044 cases from a population of 25.4 million people.

That means Iceland’s infection rate is roughly 22 times greater than Australia’s, not factoring in other variables for either location. While heat and humidity could play a role in the disparity, a look at the impact of UV rays reveals it may be more substantial than the other two weather factors.



posted on Apr, 2 2020 @ 05:52 PM
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I will make this super simple from an ER physician standard.

Cold weather generally means more nasal discharge.
More nasal discharge means more cracking of the skin.
Open skin means viruses and bacteria have an easier time entering the body.

It’s that simple.

Warm, humid conditions are wonderfully effective keeping viruses at bay.

-Chris



posted on Apr, 2 2020 @ 06:35 PM
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originally posted by: Christosterone
I will make this super simple from an ER physician standard.

Cold weather generally means more nasal discharge.
More nasal discharge means more cracking of the skin.
Open skin means viruses and bacteria have an easier time entering the body.

It’s that simple.

Warm, humid conditions are wonderfully effective keeping viruses at bay.

-Chris


Idk, my spring allergies have caused quite a discharge since stuff started blooming.



posted on Apr, 2 2020 @ 06:40 PM
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a reply to: Fools

Perhaps the lack of contrails is letting the sun hit where it doesn't hurt so much.

Clouds may insulate, but they also bring humidity.

Roll on summer eh?



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