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How does a curfew stop a virus?

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posted on Apr, 1 2020 @ 09:54 AM
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Last night I stopped at the gas station to get some gas.

Through her coughing and sneezing and wiping her nose on the back of her hand the woman working the register told me they had just got an order from the police department requiring everything to close down at 12 a.m. Saying that if anyone is seen out they’ll be arrested. No questions asked. Arrested. Unless they have certain papers that say you can be out.

I #### you not. Papers. Show me your papers or come with me. Part of me feels like that guy in that really old movie The Twilight Zone. Where he gets sent back in time to Germany in the late 1930s.

My question is, in what way does a 12 a.m. curfew stop the spread of a virus? All stores, restaurants and bars are already voluntarily closed. There’s also already an order prohibiting groups of 5 or more people in public. No one is out at that time of night anyway. So how does this stop the virus from spreading?

I can’t for the life of me figure out in what way prohibiting people from being out when the streets are already empty helps stop the spread of a virus. Did someone give the Coronavirus a copy of this order that it signed off on?

What gives?




posted on Apr, 1 2020 @ 10:00 AM
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I wondered that myself. I guess people in charge just like curfews, moms and dads to their kids, and big daddy government to all us sniveling masses.

I expect way more draconian measures to hit ohio this week as our govna said over the weekend that us pleebs don't seem to be taking this serious enough.



posted on Apr, 1 2020 @ 10:06 AM
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a reply to: underwerks

Apparently it's juat to limit the exposure of first responders and people who might be working after midnight.............. 😑



posted on Apr, 1 2020 @ 10:15 AM
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originally posted by: underwerks
My question is, in what way does a 12 a.m. curfew stop the spread of a virus?


You have to open your mind to realize there might be ancillary effects of this virus outbreak. By having a curfew, that should mean less patrols will be needed by the police during the nighttime hours. Because I'm sure the police will potentially be more needed during the daytime hours because of this pandemic. I'm also sure I heard where police are being used more and doing double shifts, etc., so if they don't have to patrol as much at night, they can get some rest. There are many day-to-day things we've gotten used to in life that are being challenged by this outbreak. It's a time of uncertainty. I think this could be a reason for curfews.



posted on Apr, 1 2020 @ 10:16 AM
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a reply to: underwerks

yeah, I know. I have to carry papers in my vehicle now if I am stopped.



posted on Apr, 1 2020 @ 10:16 AM
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For one; crime. We had to set a curfew during Katrina due to criminal activity, mainly theft. It's much easier to steal, break in with everything shutdown. We had light sets chained up and they got stolen twice. After the curfew the crime fell off a cliff.



posted on Apr, 1 2020 @ 10:29 AM
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a reply to: underwerks

It doesn't stop it, it slow down the spreading.



posted on Apr, 1 2020 @ 10:55 AM
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a reply to: underwerks

We don't have a curfew in place here, but if it does I know why.

We've had a problem with teens gathering in large groups late at night, with outright brawling occurring at some of these gatherings. Also the corner drug dealers are out in force during the wee hours after midnight, as well as thieves/burglars.

I don't know where you live but we have a huge gang population in some parts of town here.

In the small town in Texas where I'm originally from they have a 24 hour curfew in place- no one under the age of 18 is allowed to be out without a parent of guardian unless they are going to or from work. They were having a problem with teens having large gatherings as well, and the problems that come along with that.

Not sure why you have a curfew in your city or state, but I would guess they are trying to curttail similar issues.



posted on Apr, 1 2020 @ 10:56 AM
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a reply to: underwerks

Cats.

Those demon entities roam the night, and you guessed it, they eat crows, so its just logic.



posted on Apr, 1 2020 @ 11:37 AM
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Because legitimate business doesn't happen past 12am. People don't go grocery shopping, bring food to relatives, have any real reason to be out. It's the time for socializing and bars. Less socializing is less spread.

a reply to: underwerks



posted on Apr, 1 2020 @ 01:17 PM
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originally posted by: underwerks
Last night I stopped at the gas station to get some gas.

Through her coughing and sneezing and wiping her nose on the back of her hand the woman working the register told me they had just got an order from the police department requiring everything to close down at 12 a.m. Saying that if anyone is seen out they’ll be arrested. No questions asked. Arrested. Unless they have certain papers that say you can be out.

I #### you not. Papers. Show me your papers or come with me. Part of me feels like that guy in that really old movie The Twilight Zone. Where he gets sent back in time to Germany in the late 1930s.

My question is, in what way does a 12 a.m. curfew stop the spread of a virus? All stores, restaurants and bars are already voluntarily closed. There’s also already an order prohibiting groups of 5 or more people in public. No one is out at that time of night anyway. So how does this stop the virus from spreading?

I can’t for the life of me figure out in what way prohibiting people from being out when the streets are already empty helps stop the spread of a virus. Did someone give the Coronavirus a copy of this order that it signed off on?

What gives?


I got my official papers from work , 2 weeks ago.
In case the state imposed a "stay at home" and I had to drive into work.



posted on Apr, 1 2020 @ 01:37 PM
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Normally over night available resources are typically limited or reduced across many industries and city services in the best of times.

Just about all of those same industries and city services are now also substantially decreased due to COVID.

So , looked at in a vacuum , someone being out past midnight seems silly but when you look at the bigger picture it starts to make sense.

Pick NYC for example, yes I know that is the hardest hit city in the US right now so and extreme example, and imagine some crime , accident, unexpected event taking place over night and resources that are already stressed and stretched too thin respond pulling those same resources off of whatever scenario they were already trying to control.

Think of the ripple effect that just one major accident could have to help spread the virus and add to the chaos in a city.

I know CT's, not directed at you, love this concept that the world happens sequentially and everything is planned but the reality of it is chaos plays a part life so measure like this are to try and control that chaos as much as possible.



posted on Apr, 1 2020 @ 02:56 PM
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a reply to: opethPA

Huh?

Do you mean they are lying to us to protect us?

Ordo Ab Chao



posted on Apr, 1 2020 @ 03:14 PM
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originally posted by: hombero
Because legitimate business doesn't happen past 12am. People don't go grocery shopping, bring food to relatives, have any real reason to be out. It's the time for socializing and bars. Less socializing is less spread.

a reply to: underwerks


You're so full of crap there, you obviously don't live anywhere that has 24 hour manufacturing. WE DO. My husband works in manufacturing, he used to work 6pm to 6am (though he used to go in after 4 to get head starts on things), now it's 6am to 6pm (still goes in after 4 to get head starts on things) Those third/overnight shifters do a lot of shopping on their days off when you're snoozing. The world doesn't operate by the same 9-5 rules your town apparently does.

Aside from that, I personally prefer to do any Meijer shopping at 3am, and I am not joking around. Very few people in there, the employees are much happier and less frenzied. It's quiet, and relaxing. For people like me that really don't like to shop among the throngs, that's the time to do it.



posted on Apr, 1 2020 @ 03:16 PM
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a reply to: underwerks

The 'Rona is afraid of the dark. Dur.



posted on Apr, 1 2020 @ 03:53 PM
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originally posted by: hombero
Because legitimate business doesn't happen past 12am. People don't go grocery shopping, bring food to relatives, have any real reason to be out. It's the time for socializing and bars. Less socializing is less spread.

a reply to: underwerks



Some of the best things that have happened to me happened after 12 am.




posted on Apr, 1 2020 @ 05:07 PM
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originally posted by: hombero
Because legitimate business doesn't happen past 12am. People don't go grocery shopping, bring food to relatives, have any real reason to be out. It's the time for socializing and bars. Less socializing is less spread.

a reply to: underwerks



What a load of rubbish. Before all of this BS went started practically everything I did was at night. I get my groceries at night. I go to the gym between the hours of midnight and 3am.

Many people I know have the same schedule. We work at night, we exercise at night, we go about our lives at night.

Thinking that nothing legitimate goes on at night is a decades old mentality that just isn't true anymore.



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