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Could sound change the shape of a virus?

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posted on Mar, 22 2020 @ 06:25 AM
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As my title suggests, my question is in relation to the specific design of a virus and its shape.
Anyone with knowledge is welcome to give input on this discussion.

As we all know, sound frequencies have a direct relation with forming shapes at set frequencies.
My question is, would it be possible to change the very structure of a biological virus by resonating it with condensed sound waves at certain frequency?
Most things have a resonant frequency, wouldnt this be true for something like a virus?
Would it be possible to change a virus itself using its resonant frequency?




posted on Mar, 22 2020 @ 06:49 AM
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a reply to: kiliker30

I would imagine that once the virus attaches itself to a cell in the body the shape changes.

Probably the shapes are ununiform once attached as it mutates the cells.

But what would i know.
edit on 22-3-2020 by CthruU because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 22 2020 @ 09:10 AM
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a reply to: CthruU

That is exactly what I am talking about.
Do you think it is possible to reshape a cell after it has been infected with a virus to restabilize it from being taken over?
To freeze it in place or suspend it using sound.



posted on Mar, 22 2020 @ 09:51 AM
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Frequencies can alter the shape and activity of most living things. They can also kill a virus. Standing in front of a rock band's speakers could possibly kill viruses, just as ultaviolite does....that black light on the dance floor kills viruses.

I think that we should all get blacklights and listen to loud music.



posted on Mar, 22 2020 @ 09:52 AM
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Interesting concept. But how would you protect the rest of the organism from deleterious effects of the sound waves? Here's an article where ultrasonic frequency was tested on bacteria and viruses in suspension. The test successfully killed off the organisms, but I doubt if the same technology could be used on a functional, living organism.


Quantitative Assessment of the Germicidal Efficacy of
Ultrasonic Energy
G. SCHERBA,1 R. M. WEIGEL,' AND W. D. O'BRIEN, JR.2*
Department of Veterinary Pathobiology' and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering,2
University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801
Received 31 January 1991/Accepted 1 May 1991



Propagated (free-field) ultrasonic energy at a frequency of 26 kHz was used to expose aqueous suspensions
of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, BaciUus subtilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), fungus
(Trichophyton mentagrophytes), and viruses (feline herpesvirus type 1 and feline calicivirus) to evaluate the
germicidal efficacy of ultrasound. There was a significant effect of time for all four bacteria, with percent killed
increasing with increased duration of exposure, and a significant effect of intensity for all bacteria except E.
coli, with percent killed increasing with increased intensity level. There was a significant reduction in fungal
growth compared with that in the controls, with decreased growth with increased ultrasound intensity. There
was a significant reduction for feline herpesvirus with intensity, but there was no apparent effect of ultrasound
on feline calicivirus. These results suggest that ultrasound in the low-kilohertz frequency range is capable to
some degree of inactivating certain disease agents that may reside in water. The physical mechanism of
inactivation appears to be transient cavitation.


aem.asm.org...



posted on Mar, 22 2020 @ 10:13 AM
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Why do you limit this query to ‘sound’?

Sound is what we hear, and that particular range is quite limited in scope.

Do you mean electromagnetic frequencies?

Shucks, maybe ‘sound’ can alter a lot of things, especially when the eardrum cannot
detect it. There is, however, more to hearing than mere eardrums. I believe the auditory
cortex can hear well beyond the range of the eardrum, though science may be playing dumb
about this. You know, the standard ‘but what’s vibrating?’ excuse. We see it quite often around these
parts. I venture that sound, I mean electromagnetic frequencies, can do a lot to change the shapes
of things. It’s all just a crap shoot.

Let’s find out what happens.

Can you hear me now?

# 1086
edit on 22-3-2020 by TheWhiteKnight because: (no reason given)

edit on 22-3-2020 by TheWhiteKnight because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 23 2020 @ 08:29 AM
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originally posted by: kiliker30
a reply to: CthruU

That is exactly what I am talking about.
Do you think it is possible to reshape a cell after it has been infected with a virus to restabilize it from being taken over?
To freeze it in place or suspend it using sound.


I think the answer is to kill it pre entry by sound manipulation, the type of sounds probably inaudible to human ears.

But once inside i think it would be highly dangerous to healthy cells and rythmic heartbeat.



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