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Wash your hands, keep your distance, stick your head between your legs and ...

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posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 11:57 AM
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I have a question for folks familiar with the European situation over there.

In Canada, it seems we are trying to "Flatten the curve". I don't know if this is the latest buzz phrase or what. It does make sense though... Instead of everyone getting sick at once, we are trying to spread it out over time to not overwhelm the hospitals, medical staff, etc, etc.

We are also being told to "Wash our hands often" and try to maximize "Social Distancing".

My question is this. Did Italy or other countries have public service announcements telling their citizens to "Wash your hands, and impose social distancing with each other"?




posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 12:00 PM
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a reply to: ByteChanger

Not until too late.



posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 12:03 PM
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In the UK, we have a public service announcement campaign advising the exact same measures, and I don't you can miss it as it is everywhere. These are on advertising boards, posters in workplaces and public places, TV and the BBC news feed regularly reminding us of the symptoms and ways to reduce risk.

I don't think Italy, etc, were as quick to advise the public.
edit on 1932020 by Churchhousecreeper because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 12:09 PM
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I think the US has been leading the way in many areas to limit spread. I think I read that the EU is about 2 weeks a head of us and that really has little to do with location as much as delaying two weeks to get serious.

One interesting point is how did China and SK get so many testers so quickly?



posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 12:13 PM
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I keep hearing people say that Italy has one of the best healthcare systems in the world, but I have to wonder if those people have ever actually been there, or just to the nice parts.

I've been to a few different places in Italy. Some places are nice, but a lot of places aren't so great. Take Naples for instance. They don't even have toilets in a lot of places. Just porcelain (if you're lucky) holes in the ground to squat over. There's trash everywhere. Garbage cans overflowing. Underage kids running around trying to kill you with the mopeds they can barely control. If they're not trying to kill you they're trying to solicit you. People, both male and female piss on the sidewalk. Drivers will run up on the curb.

Don't get me wrong. It's a cool place, but Italy as a whole isn't some magical utopia.



posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 12:15 PM
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originally posted by: Xtrozero
I think the US has been leading the way in many areas to limit spread. I think I read that the EU is about 2 weeks a head of us and that really has little to do with location as much as delaying two weeks to get serious.

One interesting point is how did China and SK get so many testers so quickly?


Yeah, in two weeks from now they'll say well it took three months for Italy to bad, so we'll see what the US looks like in three more months.

And then in three months, they'll say wait until next year.


As far as the testers go, probably because they already had them.



posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 12:21 PM
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a reply to: ByteChanger

I always found something interesting about the hand washing thing. Every person who washes their hands touches the handle of the faucet, both before and after, as well as the door, before and after. Not to mention damn near everything else in the store or facility, before and after. I'm sure it helps some. I do it, is required in my profession especially. I'm just skeptical it's as successful a strategy as everyone seems to think it is. Seems more of a hide under the desk during and atomic bomb type thing myself. More to make people feel better than truly stop anything.
edit on 3/19/2020 by Puppylove because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 12:33 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: ByteChanger

Not until too late.


Thanks Phage.

Yeah, that would seem to be the case. Sadly.

I'm just wondering about the effectiveness of washing your hands, and social distancing. I suppose it would slow or hinder, the progression of the virus. Which is the overall objective at this point I guess.

If I knew Italy was scrubbing furiously for the last two weeks, I'd be more pessimistic probably.

Reading some of the other posts above, I gather that is not the case.



posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 12:35 PM
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a reply to: ByteChanger

This 8-minute video speaks directly to social distancing and the difference between various scenarios.




posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 12:36 PM
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originally posted by: ByteChanger
I have a question for folks familiar with the European situation over there.

In Canada, it seems we are trying to "Flatten the curve". I don't know if this is the latest buzz phrase or what. It does make sense though... Instead of everyone getting sick at once, we are trying to spread it out over time to not overwhelm the hospitals, medical staff, etc, etc.

We are also being told to "Wash our hands often" and try to maximize "Social Distancing".

My question is this. Did Italy or other countries have public service announcements telling their citizens to "Wash your hands, and impose social distancing with each other"?


What the 'government' is suggesting is mostly futile.

Consider that we have the spread of the virus while even in places of tight hospital quarantine (doctors and nurses succumbing) as evidence.

Firstly, over the next year or so, at some time or other, you are going to get the Covir-19 virus. That truth will scare some but look at how it is actually spreading and compare it's spread to similar viruses.

This is not a bad thing. It is the way we develop immunity in a war between pathogens and us. It has been going on as long as there has been life.

Consider these facts:

Droplets from a cough or sneeze can stay in the air for 10 minutes.

How far do coughs and sneezes travel? - Science Focus

A 'moderate breeze' is about 5 meters/second.

Beaufort scale from Wikipedia

10 minutes suspension in air x 60 seconds per minute x 5 meters per second = 3,000 meters or 3 km of travel.

A cough can produce particles that can travel 3 km!

A virus can survive on a hard surface for up to 24 hours to three days. In aerosolized form, it can last 3 hours. Long enough to travel for 10 minutes and then sit on a surface for hours, up to 3km from ground zero.

How Long Does the Coronavirus Last on Surfaces? - Wired

So, if one were to set up a perimeter around a quarantined person, it should really extend up to 3 km down-wind.

This is why self-quarantine and the personal distancing is just BS. Similarly, this explains why the face masks and wash hands protocols are not 100% effective and the virus continues to spread, even where protocols are tightly adhered to (like in China and Italy under high quarantine).

It is yet another instance of the "duck and cover" advice from the government, so that they can appear to be 'proactive'. It also costs the government nothing to put the onus on the public, another 'washing of the hands'.
Until a vaccine is developed, the best form of treatment for severe cases is oxygen therapy. This is because the virus attacks the lungs, filling them with fluid and inhibiting the uptake of oxygen required for metabolism. This requires oxygen tanks, masks and tubing in large volumes while people are fighting the virus. If they survive the pneumonia, then their immune system will eventually defeat the virus and they will have acquired immunity (in most cases).

So, the real thing is to ensure that there are enough medical resources to support people through the symptoms, at least the first time through. After that, we will have the herd immunity to counter the virus when or if we encounter it again.

And, if you are at home, self-quarantined, how do you call for help when you can hardly breathe? This self-quarantine nonsense will kill people.

edit on 19/3/2020 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 12:37 PM
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originally posted by: Puppylove
a reply to: ByteChanger

I always found something interesting about the hand washing thing. Every person who washes their hands touches the handle of the faucet, both before and after, as well as the door, before and after.


I always use the paper towels to turn off the faucet and open the door.



posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 12:38 PM
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a reply to: ByteChanger

Yeah the six feet thing seems a more comfort thing myself. Imagine if you will, people in line standing six feet apart. Each person is breathing the requisite distance away. Person at front of line finishes and heads off. Everyone shifts forward, each having just taken a breath, and breathing as they shift positions. Six feet has accomplished what in this scenario? Now make a building with people shambling about, but staying six feet apart, same scenario. Is this more hiding under the desk from the bomb, because it sure as hell seems like it.



posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 12:39 PM
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originally posted by: Churchhousecreeper
In the UK, we have a public service announcement campaign advising the exact same measures, and I don't you can miss it as it is everywhere. These are on advertising boards, posters in workplaces and public places, TV and the BBC news feed regularly reminding us of the symptoms and ways to reduce risk.

I don't think Italy, etc, were as quick to advise the public.


Yeah, that seems to be what I'm hearing... Not quick enough or just too late period.

Thanks for the info. The UK's #'s look pretty low, slightly above USA and Canada. Praying they stay low.

Cheers,



posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 12:40 PM
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a reply to: ByteChanger




My question is this. Did Italy or other countries have public service announcements telling their citizens to "Wash your hands, and impose social distancing with each other"?


No but Korea did and it seems to be working pretty darn well.



posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 12:40 PM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

Then you put the towel down, go through the store, touching whatever you need, including your cart.



posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 12:41 PM
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originally posted by: Puppylove
a reply to: ByteChanger
Seems more of a hide under the desk during and atomic bomb type thing myself. More to make people feel better than truly stop anything.


That is exactly what I'm feeling like right now. Thank you!



posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 12:41 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

You are right about medical equipment and dead-wrong about social distancing.



posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 12:41 PM
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originally posted by: AutomateThis1

Yeah, in two weeks from now they'll say well it took three months for Italy to bad, so we'll see what the US looks like in three more months.

And then in three months, they'll say wait until next year.


As far as the testers go, probably because they already had them.


Unless we flatten the curve quicker, and this economic and social Marshal Law environment can do just that.



posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: Puppylove

Which is fine as long as your not touching your face. The only way the virus is getting in is through your mouth, nose, or eyes.

So, just wash your hands again when you get home.



posted on Mar, 19 2020 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: FauxMulder

It's a nervous unconscious response we all do. I'm guessing you touch your face several times without ever even realizing you did it. You're fooling yourself if you think you're getting from the bathroom at the store and all the way home without doing so.



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