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NEWS: These Hitmen Wore Badges

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posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 03:29 AM
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Their job was to serve and protect the find people of New York, but charges brought against two retired New York city detectives accuse the pair, former partners, of working for the mob while they collected a city paycheck. The two are alleged to have been hired guns for the Luchese crime family. An investigation that started in 1994 culminated with the arrest of the two men, Stephen Caracappa and Louis Eppolito, yesterday in Las Vegas.
 



www.nytimes.com
The charges, detailed in an indictment unsealed in Federal District Court in Brooklyn, were among the most startling allegations of police corruption in memory. In one case, in 1990, prosecutors said the detectives, driving an unmarked police car, pulled over a Mafia captain on the Belt Parkway in Brooklyn and shot him to death for a rival mob figure. In another, in 1986, they flashed their badges and kidnapped a mobster, threw him in the trunk of their car and delivered him to a rival, who tortured and killed him.

"In a stunning betrayal of their shields, their colleagues and the citizens they were sworn to protect, Louis Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa secretly worked on the payroll of the mob while they were members of the N.Y.P.D," the United States attorney in Brooklyn, Roslynn R. Mauskopf, said at a news conference to announce the indictment.

For years, Ms. Mauskopf charged, the men had been paid handsomely for their role in the killings and for routinely funneling secret information about criminal investigations to other members of organized crime. In most of the killings, she said, they did not pull the trigger but helped other hit men track down the victims, at one point becoming so instrumental that they were put on the mob's payroll at $4,000 a month.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


This is a stunning betrayal, if the charges are true. Police are human, and so they are subject to the same temptations as ordinary men, but because of their position of power, we hold them to a higher standard of decency than ordinary men. These two were allegedly paid large sums of money to act as enforcers, hitmen, and inteligence gatherers for the mafia, at the same time they collected a paycheck subsidized by the taxpayers of New York.

If the charges are true, no penalty could be too harsh. There is a great amount of distrust in the police, a disturbing amount of resentment on the part of ordinary citizens precisely because of situations like this; they stick in the memory longer and make a far greater impression than the small, helpful, everyday actions of the 'good guys.' Cases like this erode public trust and cause irreparable damage to the integrity of the Justice system. Men like these two make the jobs of good cops much more difficult and dangerous, and such behavior should never be tolerated.




posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 03:33 AM
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This is a stunning betrayal, if the charges are true. Police are human, and so they are subject to the same temptations as ordinary men, but because of their position of power, we hold them to a higher standard of decency than ordinary men.


Well maybe if you had a very sheltered upbringing. I have been exposed to both the best and well not the worst but down there of the Toronto Police Forces, and they are just like you and me. Some of them are Criminals who kept clean until they got the badge or got corrupted somewhere down the line. Happens in every job and these days Cops treat thier job like a um job.



posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 06:15 AM
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2 @ssholes like this make all cops look bad...i hate these kind of stories...



posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 06:22 AM
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Sardion
These sorts of stories certainly don't surprise me, but they never cease to offend me. It's amazing what just a little bit of power can do to corrupt people, and money is power. The mob's influence has waned considerably in recent decades, and I wouldn't be surprised if we're seeing a clean up by authorities, this isn't the only mob story in the news recently, I posted another one yesterday.

So, again, it doesn't surprise me, but I can't help but feel really abused when I read stuff like this. I mean, I pay their salary, and for what? So they can put a bullet in the back of my skull if given half a chance...

Basement
It's frustrating for good cops more than you can imagine. They end up getting all the flak for what a few crooked cops do. The bad guys collect the money, while the good guys get lumped into the same category and end up hated for no reason. That sort of seemingly irrationaly hatred can really turn a cop against the people he/she is supposed to protect. It fosters resentment all around. The same thing happens with politicians. It's an insult, and a crime of the highest order when our 'servants' stab us in the back like this.



posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 09:54 AM
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Originally posted by BasementAddix
2 @ssholes like this make all cops look bad...i hate these kind of stories...


I agree. You barely hear about the good things cops do- nothing is ever good enough, fast enough, etc. Armchair generals trying to second guess a cop's actions.

People resent cops as is. The public is hostile, which makes their jobs all the more hard.

Like the man said- two assholes making the rest of the law enforcement community look bad.

DE



posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 10:04 AM
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I've never had a cop do anything personally nice to me. Indirectly I'm sure they may have done something to help me but usually they just give me speeding tickets and the occasionial CS gas and rubber bullets at demonstrations.

Cops? Can't live with em' wish we could live without em'.



posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 01:30 PM
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Thankfully I've had enough positive experiences with the police to act as balance. I've met some real pigs, and some real nice guys as well.

I accidentally tape recorded a cop who pulled me over once, the tape recorder was running in the front seat because my friends and I were, at the time, in the habit of recording our conversations because we couldn't remember them otherwise.

I had a very pleasant five minute conversation by the side of the road while the tape rolled on. We talked about loving to drive fast, the midwest, going home, nice, mellow stuff. He never even asked for my liscense or registration. I started up a conversation with him, and he had no problem treating me like a person instead of a subject. Later, when I found out the tape had been running, I thought "what are the chances I'll have the tape recorder running if some pig pulls me over and gives me a hard time or does something illegal like ask for a bribe? Slim to none. I just happened to have the luck to tape record the nice guy.


I've met some real power trippers though..guys who were a disgrace to everything they were supposed to stand for. Pathetic, sloppy, dangerous, and stupid, those 'men' are nothing more than children with big pants and gun belts.

On a side note, Montreal cops are real nice folks. I had a conversation with two Montreal officers about how American cops can be such pigs. It was more than a little entertaining. Too bad I didn't tape record that one huh?

Somewhere along the line, some cops get the idea in their heads that they're the only ones deserving of respect. That doesn't jibe real well with me, since I demand respect from everyone I meet. The fact that I'm willing to give it in return doesn't matter to some cops, to some people in general.

The good cops, unfortunately, are becoming scarce as public service morphs increasingly from a calling into a day job. I've dealth with a number of recruits; and let me tell you, it's a shame the kinds of people the job seems to attract. Prison guards are in the same boat, and proctologists too.



posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 02:25 PM
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Good cops? heh, aint that a joke. If these people were good and wanted to do something for their communities, maybe they could volunteer their time for social causes which would actually help the community. Such as helping at homeless shelters, food pantrys, or becoming a teacher to help educate the people of this country.

I too have never had a positive experience with a police officer. Ive been pulled over multiple times only to be asked where I was going, where I am coming from, while the Pig looks through the windows of my car for anything possibly incriminating.

I imagine there is a police officer out there somewhere who really does want to do good for their community, but Ive never met them or read about them in the paper. The only time a Pig has been non-confrontational in my experience is when they want information or me to become eyes & ears for them. But its easy enough to see through the shallow mask for the POS they really are.



posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 02:55 PM
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Originally posted by Xibalba
Good cops? heh, aint that a joke. If these people were good and wanted to do something for their communities, maybe they could volunteer their time for social causes which would actually help the community. Such as helping at homeless shelters, food pantrys, or becoming a teacher to help educate the people of this country.

Naw, they just stop domestics, bust drug dealers, try to pull drunk drivers off the street...that's not community service is it?

I too have never had a positive experience with a police officer. Ive been pulled over multiple times only to be asked where I was going, where I am coming from, while the Pig looks through the windows of my car for anything possibly incriminating.

This happens a lot... young person gets pulled over, cop give them the eye because they were driving funny or because they reek of weed, and suddenly they're all 'f*** the po-lice'! It's called plain sight doctrine. Perfectly legal. You want to complain about cops, I'll pay get you on the next flight to Russia, where the local militia will drag you into a back alley and break your legs for not giving them a bribe. Then, maybe you have a right to talk smack. Until then, you're just another punk giving the police another reason to treat every other youth they see as potentially hostile.

I imagine there is a police officer out there somewhere who really does want to do good for their community, but Ive never met them or read about them in the paper. The only time a Pig has been non-confrontational in my experience is when they want information or me to become eyes & ears for them. But its easy enough to see through the shallow mask for the POS they really are.

Eyes and ears? So, this implies they want you as a CI. Which means you're a criminal. Have you ever given them a reason to be kind? Absolutely not. You give respect, you get respect. That's how the world works.

DE




posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 04:09 PM
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Originally posted by DeusEx
Naw, they just stop domestics, bust drug dealers, try to pull drunk drivers off the street...that's not community service is it?


Not when an officer is drinking or using drugs while on duty. Not when the officer lets his buddy drive under the influence and targets everyone else. Not when an officer takes a bruised and beaten child back to the house the child fled from. Yeah selective enforcement is a real service to the community.


This happens a lot... young person gets pulled over, cop give them the eye because they were driving funny or because they reek of weed, and suddenly they're all 'f*** the po-lice'! It's called plain sight doctrine. Perfectly legal. You want to complain about cops, I'll pay get you on the next flight to Russia, where the local militia will drag you into a back alley and break your legs for not giving them a bribe. Then, maybe you have a right to talk smack. Until then, you're just another punk giving the police another reason to treat every other youth they see as potentially hostile.


Uh-huh, sorry. Ive a totally clean driving record (1 speeding ticket 11 years ago at age 18). I dont speed and I dont smoke in my vehicle. My vehilce is not a bucket and does not attract attention.

Other thing is the US is not Russia. We, at least in word, hold police to higher standards. When the Pigs want to incrementalize theyre way to the police state, they deserve to be called on it.


Eyes and ears? So, this implies they want you as a CI. Which means you're a criminal. Have you ever given them a reason to be kind? Absolutely not. You give respect, you get respect. That's how the world works.


Well I suppose I am a criminal because of a pen stroke. How easy it is to color someone with a word. With 75 Million estimated marijuana users in the US, we have a serious issue on our hands. We live in a nation of criminals and to keep 'peace' we need a police state.

Respect? #. How is asking to know what I would be charged with disrepectful? How is keeping my mouth shut and not incriminating myself or anyone else disrespectful? How is refusing a search of my person and vehicle disrespectful. How is not using my jobs position to spy on people disrespectful?

Save your damn money, and buy youself a ticket to Russia. You seem to look forward to that type society.



posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 04:38 PM
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Originally posted by Xibalba
Not when an officer is drinking or using drugs while on duty. Not when the officer lets his buddy drive under the influence and targets everyone else. Not when an officer takes a bruised and beaten child back to the house the child fled from. Yeah selective enforcement is a real service to the community.

Yes, ebcause that happens so damn often, considering the regular, random drug and sobriety testing that the force endures. As for returning children back to the abusive household, they aren't Social Services. All they can do is charge the parents, tell the CPA, and hope for the best. What you call selective enforcement is a combination of BS and the system forcing a cop to do something.

Uh-huh, sorry. Ive a totally clean driving record (1 speeding ticket 11 years ago at age 18). I dont speed and I dont smoke in my vehicle. My vehilce is not a bucket and does not attract attention.

Maybe you just like crap, or it's the end fo the month and the court-enforced quotas came up. Not exactly something the cops can control. Anyways, what have you got to fear from a random spot check? Or are you simply mad at being inconvinienced? Doesn't matter. Random spot checks catch people driving under the influence, and people with warrants out for them. If you got to complain, go to the courts.

Other thing is the US is not Russia. We, at least in word, hold police to higher standards. When the Pigs want to incrementalize theyre way to the police state, they deserve to be called on it.

Oh yes, pulling people over for spot checks and asking if you're carrying anythign illegal is the next step to the fascist police state! Grow up.

Well I suppose I am a criminal because of a pen stroke. How easy it is to color someone with a word. With 75 Million estimated marijuana users in the US, we have a serious issue on our hands. We live in a nation of criminals and to keep 'peace' we need a police state.

Don't blame me if your nation is so hedonistic that 75 million of its people support organized crime just to get their next high. Of course, not that you care where you get your drugs from...

Respect? #. How is asking to know what I would be charged with disrepectful? How is keeping my mouth shut and not incriminating myself or anyone else disrespectful? How is refusing a search of my person and vehicle disrespectful. How is not using my jobs position to spy on people disrespectful?

I can understand keeping your face shut, I can understand asking what the charge is...but if you have nothing to hide, why are you giving them a hard time? It's only making things worse. It just tells them you have something to hide, and if you have something to hide, that means it could be a gun or knife or a key of coke. The innocent have nothing to hide. If they cuff you, it's for their protection. They search you, it's for their own protection. Don't give them a reason to cuff you, it's that simple.

As for your job to spy on people, you're being asked to perform a community service. You're just giving them a hard time for kicks.


Save your damn money, and buy youself a ticket to Russia. You seem to look forward to that type society.

You're the one complaining about how awful the police are for inconviniencing you. You're hte one making outrageous claims and painting them all with the same brush. You're attacking almsot everyone I know. You seem to want nothing more than a hedonistic society where anything goes.
DE




posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 04:43 PM
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Until cops stop "protecting their own" this will continue to happen. It cannot happen unless fellow cops look the other way.



posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 04:44 PM
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why is it, a couple of bad cops are exposed, and there's this whole public opinion shift that makes all cops look bad.

But another dozen fundamentalist Muslim terrorists show up, but still fundamentalism, and Islam, such as the Wahabi sect, are above this. We're not allowed to even think that terrorists have anything to do with the rest of the groups they brag about representing. Much less talk about it, that would be "intolerant"!

If one Christian burns one abortion clinic, the slurs towards Christianity in general begin openly. The condemnation of the whole system because it allows such bad examples. The police and government get the same. I can see that comparing government and religion can be apples to oranges, but to foster blam on one entire religion while loudly proclaiming the innocence of another is hypocritical. Or giving tacit approval to the existence of gangs and colors claiming rights to free expression, absolving them of the heinous, selfish evil their individual members constantly perpetrate.

And for the poster who complains about cops bringing abused kids back to the home they ran from? Try to do a little research-*they do not get the decision or make the call*.



[edit on 11-3-2005 by Phugedaboudet]



posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 04:54 PM
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Fascinating. This guy can't even bring himself to type "police" and cuts loose with the hippy-dippy "pig" slur every time.

And we're supposed to then believe he showed even common courtesy in person?

I've dealt with assholes and saints. I've been pulled over by both. No tickets either. But my parents raised me to answer their questions with a "yes, sir" or "no, sir". Don't give the guy a hard time and even the assholes move on. You wonder why they're assholes? Try having everyone lying out their ass every time they see them. Try having every college student with a baggie of hash under his seat pretending he's a civil-rights lawyer.

Which reminds me-why is it punks can seem to remember all sorts of pseudo-legaleze about what police should or shouldn't be able to do, but they can't seem to remember that they don't have the right to rob, steal, vandalize and/or abuse others?

Chris Rock did a wonderfully entertaining sketch you should watch, called something like"How not to get beat up by the LAPD".

The main point of the skit? "Shut the F**k up!"


Originally posted by Xibalba

Originally posted by DeusEx
Naw, they just stop domestics, bust drug dealers, try to pull drunk drivers off the street...that's not community service is it?


Not when an officer is drinking or using drugs while on duty. Not when the officer lets his buddy drive under the influence and targets everyone else. Not when an officer takes a bruised and beaten child back to the house the child fled from. Yeah selective enforcement is a real service to the community.


This happens a lot... young person gets pulled over, cop give them the eye because they were driving funny or because they reek of weed, and suddenly they're all 'f*** the po-lice'! It's called plain sight doctrine. Perfectly legal. You want to complain about cops, I'll pay get you on the next flight to Russia, where the local militia will drag you into a back alley and break your legs for not giving them a bribe. Then, maybe you have a right to talk smack. Until then, you're just another punk giving the police another reason to treat every other youth they see as potentially hostile.


Uh-huh, sorry. Ive a totally clean driving record (1 speeding ticket 11 years ago at age 18). I dont speed and I dont smoke in my vehicle. My vehilce is not a bucket and does not attract attention.

Other thing is the US is not Russia. We, at least in word, hold police to higher standards. When the Pigs want to incrementalize theyre way to the police state, they deserve to be called on it.


Eyes and ears? So, this implies they want you as a CI. Which means you're a criminal. Have you ever given them a reason to be kind? Absolutely not. You give respect, you get respe


ct. That's how the world works.


Well I suppose I am a criminal because of a pen stroke. How easy it is to color someone with a word. With 75 Million estimated marijuana users in the US, we have a serious issue on our hands. We live in a nation of criminals and to keep 'peace' we need a police state.

Respect? #. How is asking to know what I would be charged with disrepectful? How is keeping my mouth shut and not incriminating myself or anyone else disrespectful? How is refusing a search of my person and vehicle disrespectful. How is not using my jobs position to spy on people disrespectful?

Save your damn money, and buy youself a ticket to Russia. You seem to look forward to that type society.



[edit on 11-3-2005 by Phugedaboudet]

[edit on 11-3-2005 by Phugedaboudet]



posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 05:09 PM
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As always, some people bash and blame all police officers because of two bad apples who happen to wear the blues...

Just a question though...all these people that call police officers "pigs" and say they are mistreated badly etc, etc...why exactly do they call police officers pigs....when the only thing that pigs mistreat, run down and eat is "Dung." So, do these people who call police officers pigs see themselves as "Dung"?....



posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 05:25 PM
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Originally posted by Muaddib
Just a question though...all these people that call police officers "pigs" and say they are mistreated badly etc, etc...why exactly do they call police officers pigs....when the only thing that pigs mistreat, run down and eat is "Dung." So, do these people who call police officers pigs see themselves as "Dung"?....


Well, you just proved you know squat about wild pigs. They're considered more dangerous than bears by many, myself included. They're definitely more dangerous than wolves. Your attempt at cuteness was a total brick because it was based on bad information.

Phuge
Most of the criminals in this country are nonviolent offenders who are dealt with in a violent fashion. That fosters resentment. Resentment fosters revolution. I think someone set this country up to fall. Question is, who benefits? There isn't some huge public opinion shift, people always feel this way about cops. You just hear about it at times like this, times of heightened agitation. People get upset, and are so well trained by our society, they simply label whole subjects with 'good' and 'bad' and go on about their day. This is one of our societal problems, and in many ways it is a self fulfilling prophecy.

A great deal of the resentment arises in minorities, mainly because they make up the majority of those individuals targetted by police. Blacks and Latinos combined make up nearly 70% of the prison population, but they represent a very small portion of America. That means there is selective enforcement going on, and there are thousands of cases that can be cited to prove this.



posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 05:45 PM
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Originally posted by WyrdeOne
1.Most of the criminals in this country are nonviolent offenders who are dealt with in a violent fashion.

2.A great deal of the resentment arises in minorities, mainly because they make up the majority of those individuals targetted by police. Blacks and Latinos combined make up nearly 70% of the prison population, but they represent a very small portion of America. That means there is selective enforcement going on, and there are thousands of cases that can be cited to prove this.


1. I've said it once, I've said it again. DO NOT RESIST ARREST. DO NOT RESIST CONFINEMENT. Even passively, you're asking for a world of hurt. What's better- sitting on the curb in cuffs for fifteen mintues while the officer sorts everything out, makes sure you aren't armed, etc. and then lets you go once he's sure you're okay; or yelling and bitching before being introduced to Captain Pepper Spray? the cop doesn't have the time, patience or will to risk his ass on some stupid drunken disorderly or traffic stop when odds are in five minute's he'll receive a call because some jackass beat his wife's face in.

2. I believe that to be more of a sociological issue rather than a policing one. The fact of the matter is that those minorities are often in worse economic straights than whites, and thus often turn to crime as a way to make ends meet or to fufill needs for protection, etc. Let me ask you this- would you rather work at Mcdonald's for piddly crap and hope that's enough to support your family, or take a chance and deal drugs? I'm not saying it's right, I'm saying there's deeper issues than selective policing.

DE



posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 06:17 PM
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I disagree DeusEx. I think it is far better to resist unlawful arrest and detention than to submit to it and encourage it. If the police treated their employers with more respect, they would receive more in return. If the citizens treated their employees with more respect, situations wouldn not escalate as often. Clearly it's a two sided problem. Cops are more easily corrupted than citizens, because they hold more power. Therefore it is the cop's responsibility to start off each engagement on the right foot so as not to be perceived as a rabid pig.

If the cop is chasing someone, or the person they wish to talk to flees or attacks, obviously then different rules apply. The initial 'interview' must be conducted with civility and respect. Most cops are really good about this, they know from experience how important it is to conflict resolution. Pigs don't know a damned thing about conflict resolution, above and beyond CHARGE!

Social problems yes, encouraged by society, punished by government. That's a double standard because it doesn't occur in affluent communities. When was the last time you read about a CEO or CFO or CIO being arrested for coc aine possession, or marijuana possession, or for having sex with minors or for selling drugs, or for assault (and we're not talking about the rich, or the rich and famous, we're talking about the strict RICH, the under the radar playas) They do these things too, and astonishingly in greater numbers than their plebian counterparts, because they have developed a lust for power. Drugs will make you do terrible things, power is the most addictive drug of all. This is fact.

The system that's bordering on malicious when you look at it from a distance. On one side of the city a black teenager is being rounded up, booked, forced into slave labor, and damaged in a hundred other ways too numerous and horrible to get into - for selling a chemical stimulant on a streetcorner to make enough money to feed himself and feed his vanity. On the other side of town, in a seventy story office building, and executive is negotiating the sale of 4 million tons of highly addictive caffeine from decaffinated coffee residue so he can make and market a new, stronger caffeine pill, bolstered and insured of success by a subliminal marketing strategy, and covert, social engineer promotion staff who ACTUALLY pretend to not work for the company while they pitch its products to their friends. Oh yeah, I forgot, to feed himself and his vanity.

Do you mean to tell me Pharma execs kill fewer people per year than drug dealers? The facts are clear when you compare the actual impact of white collar and no collar crime. White collar crime is the more insidious by far. And perhaps, I mean maybe just maybe
if our society wasn't so two faced and duplicitous people wouldn't feel the need to shun its graces in favor of violence and conflict.



posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 06:37 PM
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Originally posted by WyrdeOne

Well, you just proved you know squat about wild pigs. They're considered more dangerous than bears by many, myself included. They're definitely more dangerous than wolves. Your attempt at cuteness was a total brick because it was based on bad information.


First....regular pigs, what people usually call...pigs....are not wild pigs.... Second it was a joke, because it is a joke and an insult to call police officers pigs....more so because this name calling is because of the actions of a few...


Originally posted by WyrdeOne
Phuge
Most of the criminals in this country are nonviolent offenders who are dealt with in a violent fashion. That fosters resentment. Resentment fosters revolution. I think someone set this country up to fall.
.............


And you know this because?......

Wyrdeone....are you telling us that there are only good cops in all the police forces around the world?.... or that people who were not really criminals, but engage in civil disobidience such as rioting and causing harm to police officers or destroying public or private property are not detained "in a violent fashion" because they are resorting to violence?....and are you saying that the whole world has been set up in this fashion for a fall?...because what happens in the US does happens everywhere in the world, and it is worse in some countries.



posted on Mar, 11 2005 @ 07:00 PM
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Originally posted by WyrdeOne
I disagree DeusEx. I think it is far better to resist unlawful arrest and detention than to submit to it and encourage it.


That would only get you in jail... If a police officer detains you, you should actually do what the police officer says, then you can file charges and present a case later on, if it is true that it was an unlawful arrest.

Otherwise if you resist, then the police officer has another reason for puting you in jail... If you are truly innocent it is better if you follow the law, rather than breaking the law... It will first of all, not give another reason to the police officer for arresting you, and you will have a better change of presenting your case in court... If you present your case, and proof can be shown that you resisted arrest, the judge and jury will find you guilty anyways.



Originally posted by WyrdeOne
If the police treated their employers with more respect, they would receive more in return. If the citizens treated their employees with more respect, situations wouldn not escalate as often. Clearly it's a two sided problem. Cops are more easily corrupted than citizens, because they hold more power. Therefore it is the cop's responsibility to start off each engagement on the right foot so as not to be perceived as a rabid pig.


It is true that some police officers misuse their power, but most do not do this.... But looking at what you said in your previous post, by saying that "it is far better to resist what you call unlawful arrest"... you are one of those people who starts the day off thinking the police officer who stops you for some reason is going to be what you call "a rabid pig"...so at the end you are going to be a victim of your own actions, because you will most probably not act in a civil manner towards the police officer.

[edit on 11-3-2005 by Muaddib]



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