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Could mandatory face masks in public stop this pandemic?

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posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 01:03 PM
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a reply to: YouAreLiedTo

Here's reality. Right now healthcare providers (doctors, nurses, techs) on the front lines can't get what they need because of sheeple hoarding.

Construction crews can't get what they need for fine particulate mitigation, asbestos mitigation, and so on.

It's a tragedy of people who can't do math and don't know anything about anything yet somehow survive to adulthood.




posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 01:09 PM
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originally posted by: Jason79

originally posted by: snowspirit
Wouldn’t you need 7 billion masks, daily? I think they’re wear once and dispose- the inside and outside will both be covered in germs...


Naw they are worthless after they become damp. 10 to 30 minutes max, multiplied by 16 waking hours a day.

Edit: I am not shaving my beard, a mask will have no effect.


www.cdc.gov...

N95s are rated for 8 hours.


4- Extended use alone is unlikely to degrade respiratory protection. However, healthcare facilities should develop clearly written procedures to advise staff to:

Discard any respirator that is obviously damaged or becomes hard to breathe through.


CDC even recommends they can be reused in times of low quantities...

-Reuse1 refers to the practice of using the same N95 respirator for multiple encounters with patients but removing it (‘doffing’) after each encounter. The respirator is stored in between encounters to be put on again (‘donned’) prior to the next encounter with a patient. For pathogens in which contact transmission (e.g., fomites) is not a concern, non-emergency reuse has been practiced for decades.(7) For example, for tuberculosis prevention, CDC recommends that a respirator classified as disposable can be reused by the same worker as long as it remains functional2 and is used in accordance with local infection control procedures.(9) Even when N95 respirator reuse is practiced or recommended, restrictions are in place which limit the number of times the same FFR is reused.Thus, N95 respirator reuse is often referred to as “limited reuse”. Limited reuse has been recommended and widely used as an option for conserving respirators during previous respiratory pathogen outbreaks and pandemics.(2, 3, 10-12)

And yes, they admit it's a questionable practice...

7- Respiratory pathogens on the respirator surface can potentially be transferred by touch to the wearer’s hands and thus risk causing infection through subsequent touching of the mucous membranes of the face (i.e., self-inoculation). While studies have shown that some respiratory pathogens (22-24) remain infectious on respirator surfaces for extended periods of time, in microbial transfer (25-27) and reaerosolization studies (28-32) more than ~99.8% have remained trapped on the respirator after handling or following simulated cough or sneeze.

But the CDC is straight up telling you it's better than nothing. Stop listening to mouthpieces telling you that masks don't help.



posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 01:12 PM
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originally posted by: 0zzymand0s
a reply to: YouAreLiedTo

Here's reality. Right now healthcare providers (doctors, nurses, techs) on the front lines can't get what they need because of sheeple hoarding.

Construction crews can't get what they need for fine particulate mitigation, asbestos mitigation, and so on.

It's a tragedy of people who can't do math and don't know anything about anything yet somehow survive to adulthood.


I'm sure my N95s i bought last year at Sherwin-Williams are really hurting the supplies...

Piss off. Some if us already have supplies... We aren't causing a shortage...



posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 01:14 PM
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nope the 95's have a nice 1 inch valve......wear em for a few hours and smell the peanutbutter smell when you go by a cigarette smoker.....and at the 4 hour mark they start to drip almost. now if you want to reuse it.....allrighty then but 4 hours is a good working limit.



posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 01:17 PM
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Even the worse cases are treatable with ventilators, if we had excessive manufacturing capacity to make a fraction of the needed masks, it would be better spent making ventilators, and training people to use them. After about 80% of the population becomes ill and recovers herd immunity will kick in, and this bug will be like the thousands of other cold bugs.



posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 01:31 PM
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a reply to: YouAreLiedTo

Lets say you're one of the "lucky" who avoids it, are you wanting to wear that mask every cold season for the rest of you life?

I for would rather be one of the 99% who recovers from it and could fight off future infections.

I would even say, if I called you a coward ripped the mask from your face and spit in your eyes, I would actually be doing you a favor by saving you from a life of fear. Unfortunately for you, I'm content to sit back and watch you suffer through a hell of your own making.
edit on 14-3-2020 by Jason79 because: spelling



posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 01:49 PM
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originally posted by: Jason79
a reply to: YouAreLiedTo

Lets say you're one of the "lucky" who avoids it, are you wanting to wear that mask every cold season for the rest of you life?

I for would rather be one of the 99% who recovers from it and could fight off future infections.

I would even say, if I called you a coward ripped the mask from your face and spit in your eyes, I would actually be doing you a favor by saving you from a life of fear. Unfortunately for you, I'm content to sit back and watch you suffer through a hell of your own making.


Quiet, child.



posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 01:57 PM
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a reply to: Galacticsun

There is no 'cold virus'. The common cold is actually multiple different viruses with similar symptoms.



posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 02:14 PM
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a reply to: YouAreLiedTo

I wish, that's my year of birth in my handle. Anyways I saw in another thread that you understand herd immunity. Since you seem to be making an informed decision I can respect that. Just don't try to enforce your choices on me.



posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 02:31 PM
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originally posted by: Galacticsun
Could mandatory face masks in public stop this pandemic?


Yes.

Then you have a nice little crimewave with hard to identify criminals.

So much for face recognition eh?



posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 02:49 PM
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a reply to: YouAreLiedTo

Yeah my wife keeps them on hand for her painting, so it was a simple matter of seeing what was coming and picking up her regular stock a little earlier. That way if either of us do get ill and have to go out for a reason, we at least have some protective equipment on hand. Same with latex gloves, working with resins require having a supply of those on hand so it was a simple matter of buying normal stock a little earlier, no panic needed.



posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 02:52 PM
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originally posted by: YouAreLiedTo
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

"Thus, SARS-CoV-2 belongs to the betaCoVs category. It has round or elliptic and often pleomorphic form, and a diameter of approximately 60–140 nm. Like other CoVs, it is sensitive to ultraviolet rays and heat. Furthermore, these viruses can be effectively inactivated by lipid solvents including ether (75%), ethanol, chlorine-containing disinfectant, peroxyacetic acid and chloroform except for chlorhexidine."

60-140nm...

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...



"In 1995 the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health issued new regulations for nonpowered particulate respirators (42 CFR Part 84). A new filter certification system also was created. Among the new particulate respirators that have entered the market, the N95 respirator is the most commonly used in industrial and health care environments. The filtration efficiencies of unloaded N95 particulate respirators have been compared with those of dust/mist (DM) and dust/fume/mist (DFM) respirators certified under the former regulations (30 CFR Part 11). Through laboratory tests with NaCl certification aerosols and measurements with particle-size spectrometers, N95 respirators were found to have higher filtration efficiencies than DM and DFM respirators and noncertified surgical masks. N95 respirators made by different companies were found to have different filtration efficiencies for the most penetrating particle size (0.1 to 0.3 micron), but all were at least 95% efficient at that size for NaCl particles. Above the most penetrating particle size the filtration efficiency increases with size; it reaches approximately 99.5% or higher at about 0.75 micron. Tests with bacteria of size and shape similar to Mycobacterium tuberculosis also showed filtration efficiencies of 99.5% or higher. Experimental data were used to calculate the aerosol mass concentrations inside the respirator when worn in representative work environments. The penetrated mass fractions, in the absence of face leakage, ranged from 0.02% for large particle distributions to 1.8% for submicrometer-size welding fumes. Thus, N95 respirators provide excellent protection against airborne particles when there is a good face seal."

Depending on the manufacturer, N95 protect down to 0.1 microns.

0.14 microns is equal to 140nm (1 to 1000).

Yes, some N95 very much do protect you from this virus when used correctly.


Infection usually occurs when taking off the mask..



posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 02:55 PM
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originally posted by: clay2 baraka

originally posted by: YouAreLiedTo
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

"Thus, SARS-CoV-2 belongs to the betaCoVs category. It has round or elliptic and often pleomorphic form, and a diameter of approximately 60–140 nm. Like other CoVs, it is sensitive to ultraviolet rays and heat. Furthermore, these viruses can be effectively inactivated by lipid solvents including ether (75%), ethanol, chlorine-containing disinfectant, peroxyacetic acid and chloroform except for chlorhexidine."

60-140nm...

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...



"In 1995 the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health issued new regulations for nonpowered particulate respirators (42 CFR Part 84). A new filter certification system also was created. Among the new particulate respirators that have entered the market, the N95 respirator is the most commonly used in industrial and health care environments. The filtration efficiencies of unloaded N95 particulate respirators have been compared with those of dust/mist (DM) and dust/fume/mist (DFM) respirators certified under the former regulations (30 CFR Part 11). Through laboratory tests with NaCl certification aerosols and measurements with particle-size spectrometers, N95 respirators were found to have higher filtration efficiencies than DM and DFM respirators and noncertified surgical masks. N95 respirators made by different companies were found to have different filtration efficiencies for the most penetrating particle size (0.1 to 0.3 micron), but all were at least 95% efficient at that size for NaCl particles. Above the most penetrating particle size the filtration efficiency increases with size; it reaches approximately 99.5% or higher at about 0.75 micron. Tests with bacteria of size and shape similar to Mycobacterium tuberculosis also showed filtration efficiencies of 99.5% or higher. Experimental data were used to calculate the aerosol mass concentrations inside the respirator when worn in representative work environments. The penetrated mass fractions, in the absence of face leakage, ranged from 0.02% for large particle distributions to 1.8% for submicrometer-size welding fumes. Thus, N95 respirators provide excellent protection against airborne particles when there is a good face seal."

Depending on the manufacturer, N95 protect down to 0.1 microns.

0.14 microns is equal to 140nm (1 to 1000).

Yes, some N95 very much do protect you from this virus when used correctly.


Infection usually occurs when taking off the mask..


Argue with the CDC and
National Center for Biotechnology Information, not me. I'm just telling you what published best practices are.



posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 03:19 PM
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a reply to: Galacticsun
I don't think there are enough masks to give each person say 10 masks each, so presently there are not enough masks and with the price gouging going on with what there is presently.



posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 03:25 PM
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originally posted by: YouAreLiedTo

originally posted by: clay2 baraka

originally posted by: YouAreLiedTo
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

"Thus, SARS-CoV-2 belongs to the betaCoVs category. It has round or elliptic and often pleomorphic form, and a diameter of approximately 60–140 nm. Like other CoVs, it is sensitive to ultraviolet rays and heat. Furthermore, these viruses can be effectively inactivated by lipid solvents including ether (75%), ethanol, chlorine-containing disinfectant, peroxyacetic acid and chloroform except for chlorhexidine."

60-140nm...

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...



"In 1995 the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health issued new regulations for nonpowered particulate respirators (42 CFR Part 84). A new filter certification system also was created. Among the new particulate respirators that have entered the market, the N95 respirator is the most commonly used in industrial and health care environments. The filtration efficiencies of unloaded N95 particulate respirators have been compared with those of dust/mist (DM) and dust/fume/mist (DFM) respirators certified under the former regulations (30 CFR Part 11). Through laboratory tests with NaCl certification aerosols and measurements with particle-size spectrometers, N95 respirators were found to have higher filtration efficiencies than DM and DFM respirators and noncertified surgical masks. N95 respirators made by different companies were found to have different filtration efficiencies for the most penetrating particle size (0.1 to 0.3 micron), but all were at least 95% efficient at that size for NaCl particles. Above the most penetrating particle size the filtration efficiency increases with size; it reaches approximately 99.5% or higher at about 0.75 micron. Tests with bacteria of size and shape similar to Mycobacterium tuberculosis also showed filtration efficiencies of 99.5% or higher. Experimental data were used to calculate the aerosol mass concentrations inside the respirator when worn in representative work environments. The penetrated mass fractions, in the absence of face leakage, ranged from 0.02% for large particle distributions to 1.8% for submicrometer-size welding fumes. Thus, N95 respirators provide excellent protection against airborne particles when there is a good face seal."

Depending on the manufacturer, N95 protect down to 0.1 microns.

0.14 microns is equal to 140nm (1 to 1000).

Yes, some N95 very much do protect you from this virus when used correctly.


Infection usually occurs when taking off the mask..


Argue with the CDC and
National Center for Biotechnology Information, not me. I'm just telling you what published best practices are.


Not arguing with you .. at all. Just warning that people that do get infections while wearing masks, usually become infected when removing the mask.



posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 03:29 PM
link   

originally posted by: clay2 baraka

originally posted by: YouAreLiedTo

originally posted by: clay2 baraka

originally posted by: YouAreLiedTo
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

"Thus, SARS-CoV-2 belongs to the betaCoVs category. It has round or elliptic and often pleomorphic form, and a diameter of approximately 60–140 nm. Like other CoVs, it is sensitive to ultraviolet rays and heat. Furthermore, these viruses can be effectively inactivated by lipid solvents including ether (75%), ethanol, chlorine-containing disinfectant, peroxyacetic acid and chloroform except for chlorhexidine."

60-140nm...

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...



"In 1995 the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health issued new regulations for nonpowered particulate respirators (42 CFR Part 84). A new filter certification system also was created. Among the new particulate respirators that have entered the market, the N95 respirator is the most commonly used in industrial and health care environments. The filtration efficiencies of unloaded N95 particulate respirators have been compared with those of dust/mist (DM) and dust/fume/mist (DFM) respirators certified under the former regulations (30 CFR Part 11). Through laboratory tests with NaCl certification aerosols and measurements with particle-size spectrometers, N95 respirators were found to have higher filtration efficiencies than DM and DFM respirators and noncertified surgical masks. N95 respirators made by different companies were found to have different filtration efficiencies for the most penetrating particle size (0.1 to 0.3 micron), but all were at least 95% efficient at that size for NaCl particles. Above the most penetrating particle size the filtration efficiency increases with size; it reaches approximately 99.5% or higher at about 0.75 micron. Tests with bacteria of size and shape similar to Mycobacterium tuberculosis also showed filtration efficiencies of 99.5% or higher. Experimental data were used to calculate the aerosol mass concentrations inside the respirator when worn in representative work environments. The penetrated mass fractions, in the absence of face leakage, ranged from 0.02% for large particle distributions to 1.8% for submicrometer-size welding fumes. Thus, N95 respirators provide excellent protection against airborne particles when there is a good face seal."

Depending on the manufacturer, N95 protect down to 0.1 microns.

0.14 microns is equal to 140nm (1 to 1000).

Yes, some N95 very much do protect you from this virus when used correctly.


Infection usually occurs when taking off the mask..


Argue with the CDC and
National Center for Biotechnology Information, not me. I'm just telling you what published best practices are.


Not arguing with you .. at all. Just warning that people that do get infections while wearing masks, usually become infected when removing the mask.


Completely incorrect.

You all really need to stop spreading bad info if you aren't familiar with what you are talking about.

Read the bottom paragraph of the CDC quote:

"While studies have shown that some respiratory pathogens (22-24) remain infectious on respirator surfaces for extended periods of time, in microbial transfer (25-27) and reaerosolization studies (28-32) more than ~99.8% have remained trapped on the respirator after handling or following simulated cough or sneeze."

99.8% of microbes do NOT leave the mask, even when handled directly after a sneeze.



posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 03:32 PM
link   

originally posted by: clay2 baraka

originally posted by: YouAreLiedTo

originally posted by: clay2 baraka

originally posted by: YouAreLiedTo
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

"Thus, SARS-CoV-2 belongs to the betaCoVs category. It has round or elliptic and often pleomorphic form, and a diameter of approximately 60–140 nm. Like other CoVs, it is sensitive to ultraviolet rays and heat. Furthermore, these viruses can be effectively inactivated by lipid solvents including ether (75%), ethanol, chlorine-containing disinfectant, peroxyacetic acid and chloroform except for chlorhexidine."

60-140nm...

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...



"In 1995 the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health issued new regulations for nonpowered particulate respirators (42 CFR Part 84). A new filter certification system also was created. Among the new particulate respirators that have entered the market, the N95 respirator is the most commonly used in industrial and health care environments. The filtration efficiencies of unloaded N95 particulate respirators have been compared with those of dust/mist (DM) and dust/fume/mist (DFM) respirators certified under the former regulations (30 CFR Part 11). Through laboratory tests with NaCl certification aerosols and measurements with particle-size spectrometers, N95 respirators were found to have higher filtration efficiencies than DM and DFM respirators and noncertified surgical masks. N95 respirators made by different companies were found to have different filtration efficiencies for the most penetrating particle size (0.1 to 0.3 micron), but all were at least 95% efficient at that size for NaCl particles. Above the most penetrating particle size the filtration efficiency increases with size; it reaches approximately 99.5% or higher at about 0.75 micron. Tests with bacteria of size and shape similar to Mycobacterium tuberculosis also showed filtration efficiencies of 99.5% or higher. Experimental data were used to calculate the aerosol mass concentrations inside the respirator when worn in representative work environments. The penetrated mass fractions, in the absence of face leakage, ranged from 0.02% for large particle distributions to 1.8% for submicrometer-size welding fumes. Thus, N95 respirators provide excellent protection against airborne particles when there is a good face seal."

Depending on the manufacturer, N95 protect down to 0.1 microns.

0.14 microns is equal to 140nm (1 to 1000).

Yes, some N95 very much do protect you from this virus when used correctly.


Infection usually occurs when taking off the mask..


Argue with the CDC and
National Center for Biotechnology Information, not me. I'm just telling you what published best practices are.


Not arguing with you .. at all. Just warning that people that do get infections while wearing masks, usually become infected when removing the mask.

Not sure where you get that from. In a hospital masks are routinely worn for droplet and airborne precautions. It happens people use PPE incorrectly, but I actually don't know anyone who has been infected. Except noro, everyone gets noro.



posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 03:34 PM
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originally posted by: JON666
a reply to: Galacticsun
I don't think there are enough masks to give each person say 10 masks each, so presently there are not enough masks and with the price gouging going on with what there is presently.


My hospital had to cancel all non-essential personnel because there are no N-95 masks or sanitizer.



posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 05:10 PM
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Viruses: Parasitic infectious microbes, composed almost entirely of protein and nucleic acids, which can cause disease(s) in humans. Viruses can reproduce only within living cells. They are 0.004 to 0.1 microns in size, which is about 100 times smaller than bacteria.

What kind of paper mask is that small?



posted on Mar, 14 2020 @ 09:34 PM
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face masks won't stop you from catching the Corona virus, but if you're sick it will greatly inhibit your ability to spread it

Not as much as self - quarantine.
Which is what anyone should do with any virus
Stay at home.
Done .
Next.
Denying ignorance.
Why ?
Got nuthin better to do on a Saturday night.




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