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Another ancient impact story

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posted on Mar, 10 2020 @ 07:58 AM
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IMO the evidence continues to mount that around 12,900 years ago there was a celestial event that not only wiped out the mega fauna but did a major reset for humans as well.

Another ancient sight has been evaluated that has all the hall marks of an air burst that killed everything below. I tend to think or believe there was a comet or an asteroid that broke up and scatter gunned the earth in multiple locations kinda like the comet (shoemaker levy) that hit Jupiter in July 1994.

The title of the article is : "Fire From the Sky" which I chose not to use for this thread.



Fire from the Sky
Researchers find evidence of a cosmic impact that caused destruction of one of the world’s earliest human settlements

Found among the cereals and grains and splashed on early building material and animal bones was meltglass, some features of which suggest it was formed at extremely high temperatures — far higher than what humans could achieve at the time — or that could be attributed to fire, lighting or volcanism.

“To help with perspective, such high temperatures would completely melt an automobile in less than a minute,” said James Kennett, a UC Santa Barbara emeritus professor of geology. Such intensity, he added, could only have resulted from an extremely violent, high-energy, high-velocity phenomenon, something on the order of a cosmic impact.

Based on materials collected before the site was flooded, Kennett and his colleagues contend Abu Hureyra is the first site to document the direct effects of a fragmented comet on a human settlement. These fragments are all part of the same comet that likely slammed into Earth and exploded in the atmosphere at the end of the Pleistocene epoch, according to Kennett. This impact contributed to the extinction of most large animals, including mammoths, and American horses and camels; the disappearance of the North American Clovis culture; and to the abrupt onset of the end-glacial Younger Dryas cooling episode.

www.news.ucsb.edu...




posted on Mar, 10 2020 @ 08:33 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

I have subscribed to the Impact theory of the Lesser Dryas since I 1st heard it proposed.

This is one more piece of evidence potentially supporting the theory.

The possibility is exciting ti me, as an event of this magnitude could of set off a series of events that would of eridicated most signs of previous civilization.

Ive always felt that a lot of the megalithic sites (something ya might need with giant fauna runnin around) were wiped clean in flooding, with different soil depositions and then later reinhabited thousands of yeas later by migrating tribes, giving false dating.



posted on Mar, 10 2020 @ 09:05 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

I was reading about this new paper yesterday and was going to share but did notice that the authors behind the paper had to redact a similar report a couple of years ago when all sorts of discrpeancies were pointed out to them. They had another look and pulled that paper themselves over their own concerns. As such, i was going to leave sharing this for a few months in case any further discrepancies crop up!



posted on Mar, 10 2020 @ 11:52 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky
Seems like everyone but the academics has known about this for decades. The "fringe" has been preaching it for a long time, but details have been scant and hypothesis varied. Maybe now we can start getting down to the finer points of the event, and the warming around 11600 years ago.



posted on Mar, 10 2020 @ 12:45 PM
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Could that celestial event have been a so called solar micro nova, as Douglas B. Vogt describes in his videos?

youtu.be...

I personally find his theory very convincing.

If you haven’t seen them, I highly recommend you to watch them.
edit on 10-3-2020 by 2Faced because: Yada



posted on Mar, 10 2020 @ 12:47 PM
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originally posted by: Klassified
Seems like everyone but the academics has known about this for decades.


Academia does not want their long held beliefs questioned. They spent a lot of money on those beliefs to get where they are now. They do not want anyone on the fringe taking the decision power away from them.
edit on 10-3-2020 by spiritualarchitect because: can't spell worth spit



posted on Mar, 10 2020 @ 01:05 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

I live on the edge of the impact crater in the Chesapeake Bay. Just an interesting little factoid.
LOL.
Funny enough, my property is actually the highest point in my city I was told when we purchased it. Probably the edge of the crater causes that. And even though I have water on three sides of my neighborhood we are not on the hurricane flood map until a cat four.
I have seen the river come as close as 1500 feet from my house.



posted on Mar, 10 2020 @ 01:26 PM
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a reply to: spiritualarchitect

Amademics by nature are curious. They do not hold with silencing knowledge or stagnation of learning. Sorry.

edit on 3102020 by Sillyolme because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2020 @ 08:13 AM
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originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: spiritualarchitect

Amademics by nature are curious. They do not hold with silencing knowledge or stagnation of learning. Sorry.


And, actually, academics are always searching for new interpretations as it could basically "make" their career. So far from silencing knowledge, the opposite is true.




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