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Coronavirus: A definitive guide to buying and using face masks

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posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 07:35 PM
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Thought this might be useful

Coronavirus: A definitive guide to buying and using face masks, by a viral immunologist Link




The topic of face masks, the many types available, how they are put on, the ways they are worn incorrectly and dangerously, the stockpiling of masks for inflated secondary sales, the “recycling” of masks for personal use or resale.




In stores and online (if not sold out already) there are face masks of every grade, material, style and variety: masks made from medical-grade paper, decorative paper masks in a rainbow of colors, sleek polyurethane Pitta masks, washable fabric masks and reusable dust and allergy masks. Most of these products provide absolutely no protection against the novel coronavirus or other viruses.



edit on 1-3-2020 by violet because: (no reason given)

edit on 1-3-2020 by violet because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 07:40 PM
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Common face mask use mistakes

Let’s take a look at some common issues regarding face mask use:

A mask is worn upside down, only over the nose, not pulled under the chin, or worn only over the mouth, leaving the nose exposed. Even the best mask won’t protect if worn incorrectly.

A user constantly touching and fiddling with the mask’s filter surface, which cross-contaminates fingers and subsequent surfaces. A contaminated finger will cross-contaminate the next SEVEN surfaces it touches, e.g. phones, ipads, keypads.

Pulling a face mask under the chin for conversation or eating, and then putting the mask back up again.

Reusing or recycling masks. This has been a common and dangerous emerging practice in Hong Kong since January 2020.

Wearing the same mask for too long. The length of time that a face mask could be safely worn depends on the number of people a user has been around. The outer layer of a mask is the ultimate barrier. Like a fishing net, it will filter but also accumulate pathogens, without inactivating or killing them. The longer a mask has been worn around others, the more concentrated the infectious load becomes. A face mask should never be worn longer than a day; a doctor or nurse will go through multiple masks during a single work shift.


More
edit on 1-3-2020 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 07:47 PM
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a reply to: violet

Speaking as someone who works in the Pharma industry, who wears respirators each day, every day. Face masks are useless here. A N95 style respirator from 3M is basically the entry level "comfortable" one. T hen you need to be clean shaven in the area it touches. Oh on top of that, you get perhaps 30 to 45 minutes protection, then you need to throw it out and change it.

Wash your hands. Wash your hands, oh and wash your hands. That is the main prevention. Do not touch your mouth or eyes.

But masks? They really don't protect you.



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 09:43 PM
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originally posted by: Noinden
a reply to: violet

Speaking as someone who works in the Pharma industry, who wears respirators each day, every day. Face masks are useless here. A N95 style respirator from 3M is basically the entry level "comfortable" one. T hen you need to be clean shaven in the area it touches. Oh on top of that, you get perhaps 30 to 45 minutes protection, then you need to throw it out and change it.

Wash your hands. Wash your hands, oh and wash your hands. That is the main prevention. Do not touch your mouth or eyes.

But masks? They really don't protect you.


Masks being useless is an unpopular opinion here, but I agree with you.

Doesn't matter. There will be three more threads about it tomorrow.



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 10:37 PM
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a reply to: Noinden

Thanks for your input

I neglected to add that masks are for people who are sick, so they aren’t infecting others, they aren’t going to protect you from COVID-19. Masks keep germs in - they don’t keep germs out

Health care workers wear respirators.
edit on 1-3-2020 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 11:26 PM
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I get this catalog, I just got one in the mail yesterday. Lots of different masks at this place, some cheap, some expensive. They have decent priced heat and seal bags and rolls too, I have not ordered from this company in years, but I still get their catalog. enjoy looking through their products. www.uline.com...



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 11:43 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

I get that catalogue, threw it out though because I never used it. They sent a big fat one last week!



posted on Mar, 2 2020 @ 12:12 AM
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I want to add this about masks





Claim: ‘Face masks don’t work’
Wearing a face mask is not an iron clad guarantee that you won’t get sick – viruses can also transmit through the eyes and tiny viral particles, known as aerosols, can still penetrate masks. However, masks are effective at capturing droplets, which is the main transmission route of coronavirus, and some studies have estimated a roughly five-fold protection versus no barrier. If you are likely to be in close contact with someone infected, a mask cuts the chance of the disease being passed on. If you’re just walking around town and not in close contact with others, wearing a mask is unlikely to make any difference.

www.axios.com...



posted on Mar, 2 2020 @ 12:35 AM
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originally posted by: violet
I want to add this about masks





Claim: ‘Face masks don’t work’
Wearing a face mask is not an iron clad guarantee that you won’t get sick – viruses can also transmit through the eyes and tiny viral particles, known as aerosols, can still penetrate masks. However, masks are effective at capturing droplets, which is the main transmission route of coronavirus, and some studies have estimated a roughly five-fold protection versus no barrier. If you are likely to be in close contact with someone infected, a mask cuts the chance of the disease being passed on. If you’re just walking around town and not in close contact with others, wearing a mask is unlikely to make any difference.

www.axios.com...




You could wrap a hanky around your face, that would also help. Although, I don't even know if they make those things anymore, we used to have them when I was young for dust and spraying pesticides. Then you just toss them in the washer with the rest of the DDT drenched clothes so everyone's close smelled like DDT.



posted on Mar, 2 2020 @ 01:57 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse

originally posted by: violet
I want to add this about masks





Claim: ‘Face masks don’t work’
Wearing a face mask is not an iron clad guarantee that you won’t get sick – viruses can also transmit through the eyes and tiny viral particles, known as aerosols, can still penetrate masks. However, masks are effective at capturing droplets, which is the main transmission route of coronavirus, and some studies have estimated a roughly five-fold protection versus no barrier. If you are likely to be in close contact with someone infected, a mask cuts the chance of the disease being passed on. If you’re just walking around town and not in close contact with others, wearing a mask is unlikely to make any difference.

www.axios.com...




You could wrap a hanky around your face, that would also help. Although, I don't even know if they make those things anymore, we used to have them when I was young for dust and spraying pesticides. Then you just toss them in the washer with the rest of the DDT drenched clothes so everyone's close smelled like DDT.


I thought about that as well. I’m stuck with only using one hand so I can’t tie strings and such. If a mask loops around the ears I could manage that

I don’t know if I’m high risk of dying if I catch it, I most likely will catch it sooner or later and battle it out like I do any cold.i don’t have lung issues, diabetes , etc I have never in my life had bronchitis.



posted on Mar, 2 2020 @ 11:39 AM
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originally posted by: Noinden
a reply to: violet

Speaking as someone who works in the Pharma industry, who wears respirators each day, every day. Face masks are useless here. A N95 style respirator from 3M is basically the entry level "comfortable" one. T hen you need to be clean shaven in the area it touches. Oh on top of that, you get perhaps 30 to 45 minutes protection, then you need to throw it out and change it.

Wash your hands. Wash your hands, oh and wash your hands. That is the main prevention. Do not touch your mouth or eyes.

But masks? They really don't protect you.


Basically, this means if there is a large outbreak in your area and you do not stay indoors for the next several months with NO GUESTS, you probably WILL get it. Most people cannot do this so most people will probably be exposed. Unless (by some miracle) they actually manage to contain it or they develop a vaccine in record time.
edit on 2-3-2020 by BrianFlanders because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2020 @ 09:37 PM
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a reply to: Ksihkehe

Unpopular does not concern me. New Zealand has done this panic buying crap too.



posted on Mar, 2 2020 @ 09:38 PM
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a reply to: violet

No masks DON'T keep viruses in. IF they do not keep them out, they don't keep them in either. Washing hands, dabing when sneezing and coughing etc, thats smart. If you are sick, the masks will not protect others.



posted on Mar, 2 2020 @ 09:42 PM
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a reply to: BrianFlanders

No it does not mean that. Covid-19 is not 100% transmissiable. So yo uare not predestined to get it. But again, washing hands with soap and water before touching your face or eating, is the lowest level of protection.

The Ausies have developed a vaccine. Its not 100% effective (no vaccine is). It will take time to get past the FDA, and other regulatory agencies. BUT like with the ebola vaccine they may launch early (with permission) allowing you to sign that you get its a dangerous untested poduct.



posted on Mar, 2 2020 @ 10:32 PM
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originally posted by: Noinden
a reply to: BrianFlanders

No it does not mean that. Covid-19 is not 100% transmissiable. So yo uare not predestined to get it.


It doesn't have to be. If you're in a very densely populated area where you can't shake a stick without hitting someone, you're going to be repeatedly exposed to large numbers of strangers for a prolonged period of time (days/weeks/months/whatever) so your chances of eating whatever is in the air are astronomical. And you just said a mask isn't going to stop it.

Believe me. I have seen germophobes (people who carry disinfectants with them everywhere they go and use them religiously) get sick (with normal cold and flu) just from being in the same house and having no obvious close contact. Nothing is 100% transmissible but people should not be surprised if they get it. And the more closely packed together you are with other people, the higher the probability of it is. Regardless of whether you're being careful or not.

Which is one of many reasons why overpopulation actually is a real thing that you can only get away with ignoring for so long. Fortunately for us, this particular bug isn't as bad as it could be and younger healthier people still stand a way better chance of survival. Which is why the death toll is as low as it is.


edit on 2-3-2020 by BrianFlanders because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-3-2020 by BrianFlanders because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2020 @ 10:40 PM
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a reply to: Noinden
I’m not educated on masks, that’s why I made a thread so it can be discussed.
I’m reading a lot of conflicting advice from “experts” from the various agencies or medical professionals around the globe.

I think though if you’re sick a mask can at least reduce the risks in infecting others if you cough or sneeze?



posted on Mar, 4 2020 @ 07:42 PM
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a reply to: violet

I'd not say I was an expert, in so far as I don't study masks. HOWEVER I wear the bloody things each and every day. IF COVID-19 was more serious, I'd invest in a hood, with a hip mounted hepafilter, and a bunch of the filters. Thats what we use in out Cat 4 labs where we can't be on a tehtered air supply.

The point is, the cheap and nasty masks do NOT reduce the risk in our out with the virus. On top of that even if you have the correct mask, you have to be using them properly. THat means clean shaven in the area that they contact the skin (so they can form a seal). I've seen lots of bearded individuals in the news with P2 and N95 respirators on (respirators have a filter, masks don't). Which is a waste of the masks, and they are getting no protection.



posted on Mar, 4 2020 @ 07:45 PM
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a reply to: BrianFlanders


People are over reacting to COVID-19. Unless you are immuno compromised, over 70, etc, you are unlikely to die from it. Its mortality rate is yes higher than your average flu, but less than the 2009 swine flu (which I got, and survived), and way less than the 1918 Spanish Flu. Its also less than SARS and MERS, the difference is where this one hit. SARS and MERS hit sparsly populated places. This hit Wuhan, which I've been too (as part of my work in the Pharma industry). Its still not something I worry about. But I habitually wash my hands (due to working in a lab).




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