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The Reason Why Honey is the Best Medicine on Earth

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posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 02:32 PM
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a reply to: muzzleflash


Brilliant thread! Thankyou. As you know, I wanted more information on this, which you answered my PM with, but everyone should know about it's benefits.

Throw all the links you have to this thread muzzle, I will read them next week when I have more time.





posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 02:34 PM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
I feel like this thread needs a medical disclaimer.


Why?

Because you can't believe it was this simple and we been purposely left away from this?

I know it's absolutely shocking. Our system is completely corrupted by greed.



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 02:42 PM
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originally posted by: muzzleflash

originally posted by: The GUT
a reply to: muzzleflash

So which Manuka providers can be trusted? Seems like a LOT of conflicting info out there. Gonna order some for general anti-viral use but which? Thanks!


I have no clue, lol. Hypothetically you can't trust anyone.

So trust in God and the GUT lol, follow your instincts. Whatever you get I'm sure will be fine.


Lol. Thanks I guess? Okay, I got one picked out.



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 02:47 PM
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a reply to: muzzleflash

I love this but what brand of organic honey is best? You don't have to link just what to look for or names




posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 02:54 PM
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originally posted by: IAMTAT
Quick question about honey.
I hear taking honey regularly helps with allergies...but only if it's locally-collected honey.
True?


Yes, but my understanding is to exercise caution.

Start with a tiny drop and then slowly increase over time.

If they're concerned of a potential reaction then have a doctor guide them through it.

There is an amount that can be safely consumed no matter how bad the allergies are, the key to safety is always being careful. That means proceed with caution and have the doctor use the data to gauge what amount is well within the safety range.

All humans theoretically need honey to fulfill various biological functions. This would explain how people lived supposed multiple centuries of age - if those ancient accounts are even remotely accurate.

If we engineered it into super honeys and paid attention to what we were producing with good identifications, who knows how long the true healthy specimen could live? I can see 200 years at least as plausible considering optimal conditions. Possibly further beyond.



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 02:57 PM
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originally posted by: smrthack
a reply to: muzzleflash

I love this but what brand of organic honey is best? You don't have to link just what to look for or names



I just don't know.

Roll the dice.
Go to a store and ask to see their stuff and open the jars.

Order at random and find out different stuff. Eventually you can tell me which I should get lol.

Brand names are probably irrelevant.



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 03:01 PM
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originally posted by: smrthack
a reply to: muzzleflash

I love this but what brand of organic honey is best? You don't have to link just what to look for or names



It's probably best to establish a relationship with bee keepers themselves if you want the most valuable experience and they are likely much more trustworthy than any big corporations.



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 03:03 PM
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a reply to: Boadicea

That's so Great to hear!!!

Wooohooo!!

I am so thankful for your family!



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 03:32 PM
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a reply to: MissBeck

Thanks to you too! You sorta compelled me to write this by asking me a question.

The NIH links are a great starter course in learning more and it's our own govt admitting to it in the open.

Their lists are growing and not up to date with the last 5 years so all we gotta do is make this an issue to promote more research.

We could advance medicine a century overnight with official support.



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 03:37 PM
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I make my iced sweet tea with 1 cup of honey / 1 gallon water


Best damn iced tea you will ever drink.
edit on 1-3-2020 by RickinVa because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 03:38 PM
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a reply to: seagull

That's awesome to hear!

We could end pollen allergies permanently in a few years worldwide if we paid attention to nature and educated everyone.

This will eliminate billions in sales for very profitable corporations while everyone saves their $$$.

This is my form of rebellion against something I feel is very wrong with our world - our system.

I want to be what I seek to see.



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 03:52 PM
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a reply to: muzzleflash

I'm fairly sure it isn't good for diabetes.



Also, I live in New Zealand and all the farms around us have beehives. It's a big moneymaker. We also have lots of Kiwifruit (Chinese Gooseberry) farms locally too.

The Kiwifruit fruiting season is extended, and the bulking up of the fruit weight, by the use of Forchlorfenuron, which they aren't supposed to use, but nearly everyone does.

While the chemicals are, for the most part, long gone by the time the fruit is ready for harvest, it is in high concentration in the pollen on the flowers onto which it is sprayed prior to fruit development. Which the bees harvest - for their honey.

edit on 1/3/2020 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 04:20 PM
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a reply to: muzzleflash

I take a little bit every day pretty much. I think it's good for the gut too.

It's a shame to think that the critters are declining.



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 04:25 PM
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originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: muzzleflash

I'm fairly sure it isn't good for diabetes.



Mounting evidence disproving your assumption


Our aim was to improve the lipid profile and blood glucose regulation in adult patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus using metformin, by administering pure honey with appropriate dosage. Three different doses were utilized to determine the optimal dosage and were applied to case groups for 4 months with regular tracking of the parameters. After 4 months, a significant reduction in HbA1c levels was observed in all dosage groups where honey was consumed. Moreover, a decrease in total cholesterol was noted in individuals who consumed honey in doses of 5 to 25 g.


It adds that

 It has been shown that honey cleans up the reactive oxygen radicals and repairs oxidative stress, which decreases blood sugar [6]. While honey repairing renal oxidative stress in diabetic rats was independent of dosage, its hypoglycaemic effect was found to be related with dose [9,10]. This is surprising because honey is sweet and rich in sugar. Fructose and oligosaccharides in honey are thought to be responsible for this hypoglycaemic effect [2].

Honey is an antibacterial [9], hepatoprotective [12], hypoglycaemic, anti-oxidant [9], and antihypertensive [13] natural substance [14-16]. Honey decreases hyperglycaemia in diabetic rats and humans. However, the mechanism of its effects is still unknown. Honey mainly consists of fructose and glucose. The hypoglycaemic effect of honey is believed to result from fructose. Glucose and fructose impart synergistic effects on the gastrointestinal system and pancreas, and this effect is thought to increase the release of insulin. The results have shown that fructose increase the uptake of hepatic glucose as well as glycogen synthesis and its storage [16].

In studies conducted with healthy people and those with diabetes, foods with low glycaemic index were found to reduce the blood glucose level and to increase insulin secretion. Foods are classified as low (70) according to the classification of glycaemic index [17]. The international glycaemic index list also specifies that the glycaemic index of honey vary between 32 to 87. The glycaemic index of honey varies according to their botanical origins as well as the rate of fructose [17,18].

The study that Erejuwa et al. conducted in 2011 using diabetic rats determined that honey combined with oral anti-diabetics provided better glycaemic control and additional metabolic advantages [19]. From our study, it was found that in each of the three different dosage groups of honey, HbA1c values were reduced when compared to the group that was not given honey, and it was statistically significant.


What do ya think? This was top result on first Google.

Looks VERY promising.
These studies are barely scratching the surface, we haven't even engineered an anti diabetes strain yet to test with.

Dude we're gonna cure diabetes.
It's within reach.



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 04:31 PM
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This is more groundbreaking and important than anyone realizes yet but this is it, the literal panacea. It's a mixture of nearly all other medicines perfectly engineered by nature for your biological regeneration.

I am so happy about this. Can't help but keep sharing!!



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 04:34 PM
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The WHO could eliminate 90% more disease for 1% the current cost.

Why not???

Tell me why not?

Do I have to engineer and deliver the honey to everyone myself?

C'mon Earth!



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 04:47 PM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: muzzleflash

"There isn't a single disease honey can't help"? I think that's an over statement. As much as I love honey.

Yeah, I'm sure it's not great for people who have pollen allergies.



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 05:01 PM
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originally posted by: muzzleflash

originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: muzzleflash

I'm fairly sure it isn't good for diabetes.



Mounting evidence disproving your assumption


Our aim was to improve the lipid profile and blood glucose regulation in adult patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus using metformin, by administering pure honey with appropriate dosage. Three different doses were utilized to determine the optimal dosage and were applied to case groups for 4 months with regular tracking of the parameters. After 4 months, a significant reduction in HbA1c levels was observed in all dosage groups where honey was consumed. Moreover, a decrease in total cholesterol was noted in individuals who consumed honey in doses of 5 to 25 g.


It adds that

 It has been shown that honey cleans up the reactive oxygen radicals and repairs oxidative stress, which decreases blood sugar [6]. While honey repairing renal oxidative stress in diabetic rats was independent of dosage, its hypoglycaemic effect was found to be related with dose [9,10]. This is surprising because honey is sweet and rich in sugar. Fructose and oligosaccharides in honey are thought to be responsible for this hypoglycaemic effect [2].

Honey is an antibacterial [9], hepatoprotective [12], hypoglycaemic, anti-oxidant [9], and antihypertensive [13] natural substance [14-16]. Honey decreases hyperglycaemia in diabetic rats and humans. However, the mechanism of its effects is still unknown. Honey mainly consists of fructose and glucose. The hypoglycaemic effect of honey is believed to result from fructose. Glucose and fructose impart synergistic effects on the gastrointestinal system and pancreas, and this effect is thought to increase the release of insulin. The results have shown that fructose increase the uptake of hepatic glucose as well as glycogen synthesis and its storage [16].

In studies conducted with healthy people and those with diabetes, foods with low glycaemic index were found to reduce the blood glucose level and to increase insulin secretion. Foods are classified as low (70) according to the classification of glycaemic index [17]. The international glycaemic index list also specifies that the glycaemic index of honey vary between 32 to 87. The glycaemic index of honey varies according to their botanical origins as well as the rate of fructose [17,18].

The study that Erejuwa et al. conducted in 2011 using diabetic rats determined that honey combined with oral anti-diabetics provided better glycaemic control and additional metabolic advantages [19]. From our study, it was found that in each of the three different dosage groups of honey, HbA1c values were reduced when compared to the group that was not given honey, and it was statistically significant.


What do ya think? This was top result on first Google.

Looks VERY promising.
These studies are barely scratching the surface, we haven't even engineered an anti diabetes strain yet to test with.

Dude we're gonna cure diabetes.
It's within reach.


So, high fructose corn syrup must also be good for diabetics?

I'm fairly sure that if honey is good for diabetics, it isn't from its sugar content (of any type).



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 05:07 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

Your going to have to read the rest off the thread to. See your assumption requires more analysis.



posted on Mar, 1 2020 @ 06:19 PM
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originally posted by: IAMTAT
Quick question about honey.
I hear taking honey regularly helps with allergies...but only if it's locally-collected honey.
True?


Yes. This is what i came to this thread to say. You should buy local honey if you intend to find relief in it because it will likely contain your local pollens and other allergens.



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