It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Wuhan Coronavirus Symptoms at Onset

page: 2
35
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 03:30 PM
link   
a reply to: Boadicea

Lucky for us the mortality rate is very low, just a bit over two percent and those are people who were ill to begin with.

www.worldometers.info...




posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 03:36 PM
link   
a reply to: Sillyolme

Just do yourself a favor and avoid gatherings of people, avoid touching surfaces in public spaces like public restrooms, if you get ill take it seriously and don't play with it thinking it'll improve if you just ride it out (especially if you start having trouble breathing).

Early intervention with this can make a difference before it gets embedded to badly in your lungs.



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 03:40 PM
link   

originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: Boadicea

Lucky for us the mortality rate is very low, just a bit over two percent and those are people who were ill to begin with.

www.worldometers.info...


Yes! We can be thankful for that. And the more serious complications/fatalities seem to be predominantly in the elderly.

If it does take hold here, I'm worried about large urban populations with higher levels of pollution though. Especially for the elderly. I just hear so much about the pollution being a factor in China, so I worry about it being a factor here too.



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 03:44 PM
link   

originally posted by: Boadicea

originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: Boadicea

Lucky for us the mortality rate is very low, just a bit over two percent and those are people who were ill to begin with.

www.worldometers.info...


Yes! We can be thankful for that. And the more serious complications/fatalities seem to be predominantly in the elderly.

If it does take hold here, I'm worried about large urban populations with higher levels of pollution though. Especially for the elderly. I just hear so much about the pollution being a factor in China, so I worry about it being a factor here too.


Pollution smoollution, China has the worst pollution. The only factor I think anyone should be concerned about is their own immune system strength right now, that’s it.



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 03:47 PM
link   
a reply to: Deplorable

Sorry but this disease is not going to accomplish that.
You stand more chance of getting the regular ordinary it could kill you flu.

Its not the same world as 1918 when the spanish flu pandemic killed so many and this disease is not as fatal.

WHO has not declared a pandemic yet even though it is in several countries.

The best thing is to keep information up front and current and hold back fear mongering and overreaction.



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 03:50 PM
link   
a reply to: mamabeth

You're welcome.
I always eat a balanced diet. Lots of veg and lots of protein and I take vitamins.



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 03:50 PM
link   
It’s hard to say. If we look at the Washington, state case he went to a urgent care facility, on Jan 19th, and on the 23rd he was in the ICU. I think there might be SOMETHING different than flu, as first symptoms but I dunno. I mentioned this in another thread that our health, institutions are not being very transparent.



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 03:51 PM
link   


According to JAMA, on average, people became short of breath within five days of the onset of their symptoms. Severe breathing trouble was observed in about eight days.

The study did not give a timeline for when the deaths occurred.

However, an earlier study published in the Journal of Medical Virology on January 29 said on average, people who died did so within 14 days of the onset of the disease.

The New England Journal of Medicine, in a study published on January 31, also offered a look at how the coronavirus infection affects the body over time.

The study examined medical data of a 35-year-old man, who was the first case of infection in the United States. The first symptom was a dry cough, followed by a fever.

On the third day of illness, he reported nausea and vomiting followed by diarrhoea and abdominal discomfort on the sixth day. By the ninth day, he had developed pneumonia and reported difficulty breathing.

By the twelfth day, his condition had improved and his fever was subsiding. He developed a runny nose, however. And on day 14, he was asymptomatic except for a mild cough. He was still hospitalised at the time the study was published.

www.aljazeera.com... e_links



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 03:51 PM
link   
a reply to: ketsuko

I will. Thanks. You too!

Public bathrooms are for emergency or travel times. Otherwise its my own. lol

I have nightmares about dirty bathrooms.
edit on 2222020 by Sillyolme because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 03:53 PM
link   

originally posted by: Sillyolme
The best thing is to keep information up front and current and hold back fear mongering and overreaction.

Shplain this then, please:

The Chinese quarantine a city of over 10,000,000 people ... when there are fewer than 100 deaths in that city.

SNIP
edit on 2/22/2020 by Blaine91555 because: snipped needless rude comment


+2 more 
posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 03:55 PM
link   
a reply to: Boadicea

Sure. Anything that can compromise the lungs could factor in.
although I am not ready to don a mask just yet.

I seldom am out in crowds.

The grocery store is usually my daily trip into society.

Just follow the common sense things we've all been taught.

And if you do get sick, stay home.



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 04:00 PM
link   
a reply to: Bicent

There is no sense in our health organizations not being completely forthcoming. Who does that benefit?
They are getting all information out as soon as they can.
This is a new virus and information is still being collected and analyzed.

Saying they are not being transparent is just fear mongering. They are being as transparent as they can based on their knowledge.

Let's try to not worry people unnecessarily.



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 04:05 PM
link   
a reply to: Sillyolme

Fear mongering? You do see the title of this thread right? Don’t bother responding, that is not fear mongering. Wanna see fear mongering believing the total case numbers 77,990, that has not really moved in 2 days for the world. I am sure these institutions have figured out the first symptoms or a KEY symptom associated with the disease.

Stay salty
👍



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 04:22 PM
link   
a reply to: Sillyolme


Just follow the common sense things we've all been taught.


Lols yes!

I went through a time where I was hyper-paranoid about germs and getting sick... and in the end, there's only so much you can do without making yourself crazy. Take reasonable precautions for reasonable risks -- no sense making yourself susceptible! -- but there's no guarantees. So just as reasonable to take the appropriate precautions for being sick and taking care of yourself.

And that's true across the board. Not just this coronavirus.



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 05:59 PM
link   
A doctor said a high T-cell count betters your survival chances. He said that you need 7-9 hours of sleep per night to avoid having a low T-cell count



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 06:02 PM
link   
I just informed the checkers at the local market that there is a case of Novel within 2 miles or less. They looked real bummed out. Another checker was wearing a face mask and gloves



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 06:14 PM
link   
a reply to: snowspirit
When I had walking pneumonia they gave me antibiotics as well, even though they were not sure it was bacterial pneumonia....go figure.



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 06:19 PM
link   
a reply to: Lumenari

You have a PM



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 06:44 PM
link   
Nat Geo has a great article on every possible aspect of how this disease could impact the body.

Here’ s what coronavirus does to the body


For most patients, COVID-19 begins and ends in their lungs, because like the flu, coronaviruses are respiratory diseases. They spread typically when an infected person coughs or sneezes, spraying droplets that can transmit the virus to anyone in close contact. Coronaviruses also cause flu-like symptoms: Patients might start out with a fever and cough that progresses to pneumonia or worse.



In the early days of an infection, the novel coronavirus rapidly invades human lung cells. Those lung cells come in two classes: ones that make mucus and ones with hair-like batons called cilia.



Frieman explains that SARS loved to infect and kill cilia cells, which then sloughed off and filled patients’ airways with debris and fluids, and he hypothesizes that the same is happening with the novel coronavirus. That’s because the earliest studies on COVID-19 have shown that many patients develop pneumonia in both lungs, accompanied by symptoms like shortness of breath. That’s when phase two and the immune system kicks in. Aroused by the presence of a viral invader, our bodies step up to fight the disease by flooding the lungs with immune cells to clear away the damage and repair the lung tissue.


This is where most patients will resolve, the 15%-20% numbers in China are mostly older than 60 if I remember right and have other issues going on. I could also see this disease being worse with smokers or patients with autoimmune disease of the lungs because they have excess mucous, inflamed airways, sticky air sacs and damaged cilia. Nothing prednisone and an albuterol inhaler couldn’t handle unless other issues begin to happen. Bronkaid and Primatene are great for lung infections too but they have ephedra.

The shortness of breath can range from anything related to that nasty bronchial or deeper cough we can get. If you’ve ever had bronchitis or pneumonia, you know what I’m talking about. You start coughing 10, 20, 30 times and you get light headed or see stars. It’s tough to catch your breath. Others could have fluid and debris buildup, especially if they go into phase 3 which should not happen in most.


When working properly, this inflammatory process is tightly regulated and confined only to infected areas. But sometimes your immune system goes haywire and those cells kill anything in their way, including your healthy tissue. “So you get more damage instead of less from the immune response,” Frieman says. Even more debris clogs up the lungs, and pneumonia worsens. (Find out how the novel coronavirus compares to flu, Ebola, and other major outbreaks). During the third phase, lung damage continues to build—which can result in respiratory failure. Even if death doesn’t occur, some patients survive with permanent lung damage. According to the WHO, SARS punched holes in the lungs, giving them “a honeycomb-like appearance”—and these lesions are present in those afflicted by novel coronavirus, too.


They also go into systemic infections and how it can potentially infect other organ systems. It’s a great easy to read article that covers pretty much everything.


On Monday, the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention released clinical details on the first 72,314 patients diagnosed through February 11. The report shows that COVID-19 killed 2.3 percent of patients, meaning it is currently 23 times more fatal than the seasonal flu. Severe disease and deaths were reported in every age group, except kids under nine years old.


Even with controlled data, as long as the ratios remain intact, the same or similar numbers should expand in a similar fashion, maybe even improve in western nations.



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 06:48 PM
link   
a reply to: visitedbythem

That’s good advice, they’re the leaders in the process that will eventually randomly bind the antigen on the pathogen. Protein intake and vitamins/minerals are also important.



new topics

top topics



 
35
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join