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Physicists grab and merge individual atoms for first time, paving way for atomic construction

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posted on Feb, 21 2020 @ 11:44 AM
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Physicists from the University of Otago recently managed to ‘grab’ two isolated atoms with a pair of laser ‘tweezers,’ hold them still and then push them together.

“With development, this technique could provide a way to build and control single molecules of particular chemicals,”

Source

This is an amazing development in the world of science. This is on par with the control of electricity, or the invention of the internet, in my opinion. Physicists at the University of Otago in New Zealand have, for the first time in human history, figured out how to grab individual atoms and pair them together. Eventually, this discovery can lead to construction of things on the atomic level, which has practically unlimited applications in every area of life. Says physicist and team member Marvin Weyland, “With development, this technique could provide a way to build and control single molecules of particular chemicals,”. No more fighting over oil if we can just artificially create it!
edit on 2/21/2020 by trollz because: (no reason given)


More exciting, however, is the prospect of being able to take any one material and deconstruct it on the atomic level and then repurpose the atoms into the construction of any other material. Could we take a pile of dirt and turn it into a chunk of gold? Turn a barrel of nuclear waste into clean drinking water?
edit on 2/21/2020 by trollz because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 21 2020 @ 12:18 PM
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a reply to: trollz

hmm - synthetic petroleum [ from coal ] was sucessfully made during WWII - if nesecary - i am certain that in the shortage of crude oils - the process would be more efficient with modern techniques

also - the article doesnt explain how this process would work on an industrial scale hi - optput

other than that - an excellent read - S & F


ETA : - cos i missed this bit


As we surely all remember from high school chemistry, molecules require at least three atoms to form. So, while the researchers could get a pair of rubidium atoms to interact, they needed a third to make the bond hold.


NO NO - FU NO

who ever wrote that should be deprived of oxygen " cos it cannot exist [ according to writer ] "

edit on 21-2-2020 by ignorant_ape because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2020 @ 12:25 PM
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originally posted by: ignorant_ape
also - the article doesnt explain how this process would work on an industrial scale hi - optput

Well, we'd be a long way off from being able to do this on an industrial scale... But once we can, humanity will have made a massive technological leap.


(post by moebius removed for a serious terms and conditions violation)

posted on Feb, 21 2020 @ 01:02 PM
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Just think what this technology could do when incorporating a laser 3D printer. On a small scale to produce specific molecular compounds. They could create precision medicines that way instead of using plants and microbes.



posted on Feb, 21 2020 @ 01:14 PM
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Now we just need to make DNA.. and we can build any creature we want



posted on Feb, 21 2020 @ 01:19 PM
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originally posted by: moebius
a reply to: trollz
POST REMOVED BY STAFF

Well, you know, it might be because they're an excellent award-winning news outlet.

JUNE 16, 2016 — RT wins 12 awards at the US International Film & Video Festival, including two golds. The awards went to five newscasts, three documentaries, two programs and a series of the channel’s promotional videos.


April 26, 2017 — RT has bagged nine medals at this year's New York Festivals awards for the world’s best TV and film work. The channel's series of special reports from Libya and a documentary on the water crisis in India received top prizes.
The RT network was nominated in 18 categories of the prestigious international television and film competition, and received awards in half of them – two gold, four silver and three bronze.

edit on Fri Feb 21 2020 by DontTreadOnMe because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2020 @ 01:44 PM
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originally posted by: Spacespider
Now we just need to make DNA.. and we can build any creature we want


I think we should create ten foot tall spiders then use them to make ropes and nets.



posted on Feb, 21 2020 @ 02:08 PM
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originally posted by: trollz

originally posted by: ignorant_ape
also - the article doesnt explain how this process would work on an industrial scale hi - optput

Well, we'd be a long way off from being able to do this on an industrial scale... But once we can, humanity will have made a massive technological leap.


Definitely next level 3D printing. Star Trek replicators are on thier way.



posted on Feb, 21 2020 @ 02:34 PM
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originally posted by: trollz

originally posted by: ignorant_ape
also - the article doesnt explain how this process would work on an industrial scale hi - optput

Well, we'd be a long way off from being able to do this on an industrial scale... But once we can, humanity will have made a massive technological leap.


If past performance is any clue...technology is first used by the military, if not created by the MIC.

imo eventually mankind will technology itself out of existence.



posted on Feb, 21 2020 @ 02:43 PM
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I wonder what goes through the scientists minds just before trying something like this
"Well, the last time we split an atom, we blew up the town, I wonder what will happen if we squeeze two of them together? Here, hold my beer ..."



posted on Feb, 21 2020 @ 02:51 PM
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originally posted by: olaru12

originally posted by: trollz

originally posted by: ignorant_ape
also - the article doesnt explain how this process would work on an industrial scale hi - optput

Well, we'd be a long way off from being able to do this on an industrial scale... But once we can, humanity will have made a massive technological leap.


If past performance is any clue...technology is first used by the military, if not created by the MIC.

imo eventually mankind will technology itself out of existence.


That's a pretty pessimistic outlook.

The reality is death due to war is probably at the lowest rate, as far as population percentage, as it has ever been over the last 50 years.

There are a few hotspots around the globe, but there has been no wholesale slaughter since Viet Nam.

I suppose you could cite Desert Storm, but that wasn't a protracted affair. It was maintaining international law, and largely supported by the UN, as a whole.



posted on Feb, 21 2020 @ 02:54 PM
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a reply to: trollz

A molecule with 10 atoms would require 10 operations. For any significant amount, say a few ounces, one would then need about 10^25 total operations. At one per second, it would take about 3x10^18 years. The universe is about 1.5X10^9 years old. Long term employment picture is good.



posted on Feb, 21 2020 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: trollz

Didn't they do this 20 years ago, or is the merging something new?

www.wired.com...



posted on Feb, 21 2020 @ 04:22 PM
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a reply to: moebius

lots of other links for the story

Physicists grab individual atoms in groundbreaking experiment

In a Huge First, Physicists Have Captured Individual Atoms And Watched Them Merge

Scientists Combine Two Single Atoms To Make A Single Molecule In Groundbreaking Experiment


a look into the nanoverse



Great OP, I have little understanding but lots of interest

edit on 21-2-2020 by UpIsNowDown because: link



posted on Feb, 21 2020 @ 06:31 PM
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originally posted by: Spacespider
Now we just need to make DNA.. and we can build any creature we want


Now you have a choice between Cthulhu or Godzilla.



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 01:12 AM
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I don't think this process will get you the rare isotopes required for nuclear science.



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 06:36 AM
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originally posted by: trollz

originally posted by: moebius
a reply to: trollz
POST REMOVED BY STAFF

Well, you know, it might be because they're an excellent award-winning news outlet.

JUNE 16, 2016 — RT wins 12 awards at the US International Film & Video Festival, including two golds. The awards went to five newscasts, three documentaries, two programs and a series of the channel’s promotional videos.


April 26, 2017 — RT has bagged nine medals at this year's New York Festivals awards for the world’s best TV and film work. The channel's series of special reports from Libya and a documentary on the water crisis in India received top prizes.
The RT network was nominated in 18 categories of the prestigious international television and film competition, and received awards in half of them – two gold, four silver and three bronze.


Yep!

In my experience, RT are a solid source.



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 08:09 AM
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a reply to: trollz

It's not quite StarTrek transporter technology just yet, but it may just pave the wave to such.

The possibilities are abundant, to say the least, chemistry wise anyhoo.

edit on 22-2-2020 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2020 @ 11:24 AM
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originally posted by: trollz
Could we take a pile of dirt and turn it into a chunk of gold? Turn a barrel of nuclear waste into clean drinking water?


Nope. Gold is an element so 1 atom of gold is still gold just like any element you would find on the periodic table of elements. They aren't building atoms yet. They're just combining two atoms together.

They would need to start building on the subatomic level to create gold.

That said, this has huge potential for constructing substances like carbon nanotubes, graphine, and more complex molecules combining different elements together.
edit on 2/22/20 by redmage because: (no reason given)




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