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Wow - now *this* is a great launch picture!

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posted on Feb, 10 2020 @ 02:51 PM
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Picture of today's NASA/ESA launch of the Solar Orbiter.

And the science it will perform is going to be amazing and really inform our understanding of our own sun - Sol.

This photographer got one helluva shot...




edit on 2/10/2020 by Riffrafter because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 10 2020 @ 02:53 PM
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Nice. Looks like it is coming back down to crash.



posted on Feb, 10 2020 @ 02:59 PM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

Great photo.


But wait till Turbo turns up with his explanation of how everything isn't as it seems and the Sun is really within spitting distance of us blah blah blah.



posted on Feb, 10 2020 @ 03:01 PM
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originally posted by: spiritualarchitect
Nice. Looks like it is coming back down to crash.


Well that's because the Earth is flat and right now the moon is underneath us.



posted on Feb, 10 2020 @ 03:08 PM
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a reply to: jjkenobi

at any time there is " somewhere " on the surface of the globe - that can observe both the sun and moon .



posted on Feb, 10 2020 @ 03:14 PM
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originally posted by: ignorant_ape
a reply to: jjkenobi

at any time there is " somewhere " on the surface of the globe - that can observe both the sun and moon .


Relax hombre, just having some fun.

In this particular simulation the earth is indeed a sphere.



posted on Feb, 10 2020 @ 03:19 PM
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Swamp gas a reply to: Riffrafter



posted on Feb, 10 2020 @ 03:28 PM
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originally posted by: jjkenobi

originally posted by: spiritualarchitect
Nice. Looks like it is coming back down to crash.


Well that's because the Earth is flat and right now the moon is underneath us.


I hate it when the moon goes behind the sun and we can't see it.



posted on Feb, 10 2020 @ 03:49 PM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

That is an excellent shot.

Here are links about the spacecraft.
Wiki Solar Orbiter

ESA Solar Orbiter Page

I look forward to learning if the poles of the sun are anything like Jupiter or Saturn's...

-Driver



posted on Feb, 10 2020 @ 03:55 PM
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originally posted by: IAMTAT

originally posted by: jjkenobi

originally posted by: spiritualarchitect
Nice. Looks like it is coming back down to crash.


Well that's because the Earth is flat and right now the moon is underneath us.


I hate it when the moon goes behind the sun and we can't see it.


I know right! What's that eclipse called again?



posted on Feb, 10 2020 @ 03:56 PM
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Actually the star effect on the moon might make it an overlay. So possibly 2 pictures.




posted on Feb, 10 2020 @ 04:16 PM
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a reply to: Riffrafter
Nice shot indeed!

There was an interview with a scientist from the ESA on the radio last night about this-if it works it will be damned impressive.
Good to see the UK made some of the instruments on board(the plasma analyser and the magnetometer).

So the ESA scientist was saying how hard it was to build the thing-the shield is made of titanium covered with a special coating of crushed animal bones(!) to protect the delicate gizmos from the heat.
It(the shield)has little peep holes in it that open up for a very short time,allowing the sensors to take readings,then they shut before everything vaporizes!
Sounds pretty damned risky to me,I will be surprised and impressed if it all works as planned.
To take readings,it will get to within 60 solar radii(thats 60times the suns radius I think)of the surface,which will make things ever so slightly toasty to say the least.
We have never sent anything so close to take readings before,so this is all new and high risk.

Some good info on wiki about it:
en.wikipedia.org...

I was dozing off when I was listening to radio about it last night,and was half dreaming about the peep holes opening,and little robot arms poking through with a marshmallow on a stick,seeing how long it would take to crisp it up.
I tell you,they should have me working for them what with my quality ideas for experiments



posted on Feb, 10 2020 @ 05:27 PM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

It's like Thor landing.



posted on Feb, 10 2020 @ 05:36 PM
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sweet helicopter



posted on Feb, 10 2020 @ 10:04 PM
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Can I get a link to the picture. I can't view images on ATS.



posted on Feb, 11 2020 @ 12:06 AM
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originally posted by: AutomateThis1
Can I get a link to the picture. I can't view images on ATS.

If you click "quote" for the opening post, you see wr5e41c1aa.jpg surrounded by some pic tags.

Once you have that alpha-number you can get the link to the image of any ATS picture by using this format, so you don't need to ask for links anymore, just replace the wr5e41c1aa.jpg with whatever shows up in the quote of the post with the image.

files.abovetopsecret.com...

Awesome picture, Riffrafter!



posted on Feb, 11 2020 @ 12:30 AM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

Huh. I learned something new today. Thanks.

That pic is awesome.



posted on Feb, 11 2020 @ 12:55 AM
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originally posted by: mikell
Actually the star effect on the moon might make it an overlay. So possibly 2 pictures.



Mainly star effects come from stopping down a lot on lenses with a cheapish aperture...
Professional grade lenses can maintain a relatively round shape when stopped down but cheaper prosumer and consumer lenses with make a polygonal shape when stopped down, hence making a star effect on light sources.



posted on Feb, 11 2020 @ 12:59 AM
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It's really kind of puzzling why it's taken them so long to take a real interest in the sun. Considering what it is. I mean, I'm sure there has been plenty of science going on in the background but rarely did some NASA head come out and say "You know. We think we should probably be studying the sun. Because....well....it's the sun man and that's kind of a big deal".



posted on Feb, 11 2020 @ 01:02 AM
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originally posted by: BrianFlanders
It's really kind of puzzling why it's taken them so long to take a real interest in the sun. Considering what it is. I mean, I'm sure there has been plenty of science going on in the background but rarely did some NASA head come out and say "You know. We think we should probably be studying the sun. Because....well....it's the sun man and that's kind of a big deal".


Yes it does make you wonder. But I would have to guess that bureaucracy plays a part as well.
“Better safe than...” so they gather basic info a lot first to present preliminary findings to get funds to study more closely.




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