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How much salt do you have stored away?

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posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 07:15 PM
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I have been looking at buying some bulk salt to store for long term use.

I am looking for recommendations and info on what types of salt and how much you may have stored away for long term use.

Do you prefer table salt, coarse salt, pink Himalayan salt, or any other type of salt?



As far back as 6050 BC, salt has been an important and integral part of the world’s history, as it has been interwoven into countless civilizations. Used as a part of Egyptian religious offerings and valuable trade between the Phoenicians and their Mediterranean empire, salt and history have been inextricably intertwined for millennia, with great importance placed on salt by many different cultures. Even today, the history of salt touches our daily lives. The word "salary" was derived from the word "salt." Salt was highly valued and its production was legally restricted in ancient times, so it was historically used as a method of trade and currency. The word "salad" also originated from "salt," and began with the early Romans salting their leafy greens and vegetables. Undeniably, the history of salt is both broad and unique, leaving its indelible mark in cultures across the globe


SALT




posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 07:18 PM
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I forgot to add that one local store has a 50 pound bag of Morton's table salt for $23.99. That seems a little steep to me but my options are pretty limited in this area unless I order it.



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 07:21 PM
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a reply to: liejunkie01

Sherpa Pink Himalayan salt. I put it in an old coffee grinder and keep it in a container. My wife bought it and I kinda rolled my eyes but I am now a believer.

For one, it's more potent. Don't need nearly as much. Normal table salt, there are fillers in it. It's like triple strength of that stuff.

It also taste better. In the coffee grinder it turns into a fine dust so the salt application is more balanced in food. I love the stuff. Never going back to something like Mortons.



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 07:23 PM
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a reply to: liejunkie01

It is winter here, I prefer snow melting salt at the moment.
I never even owned salt until I started really taking cooking seriously.

I have sea salt at the moment.

Also, if this is survival...how much can you carry?

edit on 30-1-2020 by DrumsRfun because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 07:42 PM
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a reply to: Stupidsecrets

I have been pricing pink Himalayan salt.

I need to find out where I can buy some in the city. I may just end up ordering some online.



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 07:45 PM
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a reply to: liejunkie01

Sugar is a good preservative as well. I suggest getting a grasp of your local history and learn your local trees. History will point to any "licks" and there are more than Maple trees available for making sugar in a pinch.

Plants and geology are your best prepping hardware and you dont have to carry them, to be able to use them.



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 07:45 PM
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originally posted by: DrumsRfun
a reply to: liejunkie01

It is winter here, I prefer snow melting salt at the moment.
I never even owned salt until I started really taking cooking seriously.

I have sea salt at the moment.

Also, if this is survival...how much can you carry?


I do have some ice melt salt but I dont believe that ismt has been handled and packaged using food grade equipment and techniques. I am not counting out possibly having to clean and use this salt for consumotion..lol

I am currently planning on having a stash here at home and then in turn take some for the road if needed in an emergency situation.

I also would possibly barter with salt in the long term. This would make the amount needed a little more.



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 07:47 PM
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a reply to: BlueJacket

That's is good advice.

Thank you I am going to look into how to produce sugars and salts from here in the midwest.



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 07:48 PM
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a reply to: liejunkie01

Pickling salt, and about 100 pounds.

Of course, my choice was more for being able to preserve food if something happens and less about flavoring food.

My food stands up on its own and doesn't really need salt.




posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 07:54 PM
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I dont use a lot of salt.. so we have maybe 4 LBS total. Iodized salt maybe 2 of the 5 lb.. the rest in pink Himalayan and sea. I have probably 20 LBS if we are counting salt rock lamps. LOL! I cant keep my grandson from licking the darn things hardly. I have maybe 8 or 9 lbs of curing salt.. you know pink himalayan and iodized salt arent the best for curing, right? I mean if botulism are something youd like to prevent anyway. www.spiceography.com...



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 07:55 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari

Food preservation is also my main concern but having a nice tasting salt is also a bonus.

The 50 pound bag of salt I just looked at was actually back in the jerky making section of the store I was at.

I may still buy it and just get a few different kinds of salt. That way I am not limiting myself to one need or another.

100 pounds seems like a good amount. I believe I could get that in one tote. But moving around could be a pain.



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 07:58 PM
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originally posted by: Advantage
I dont use a lot of salt.. so we have maybe 4 LBS total. Iodized salt maybe 2 of the 5 lb.. the rest in pink Himalayan and sea. I have probably 20 LBS if we are counting salt rock lamps. LOL! I cant keep my grandson from licking the darn things hardly. I have maybe 8 or 9 lbs of curing salt.. you know pink himalayan and iodized salt arent the best for curing, right? I mean if botulism are something youd like to prevent anyway. www.spiceography.com...


Thank you for that article.

I didnt realize that curing salt was different than any other salt.

Will definitely have to find some of it.

I would like to add that I do make my own jerky and I use the curing additives that come in the package. I didnt realize that it is a different type of salt.
edit on 30-1-2020 by liejunkie01 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 07:59 PM
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originally posted by: liejunkie01
a reply to: BlueJacket

That's is good advice.

Thank you I am going to look into how to produce sugars and salts from here in the midwest.
In Ohio there are licks up and down the Western part of the state. Birch, even silver maples produce copious amounts of sap, particularly if you add some compost tea.

Look to your local Native American tribes, they had all of the licks identified, small towns and old roads are often named for them like Blue Lick near Lima, Ohio.

Kentucky has a a few just over from Cincinnati.



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 07:59 PM
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a reply to: liejunkie01

Look for Kosher or pickling salt.

Moving it wasn't an issue in my case because I am set up to bug-in...

In spades.

As for the taste, it will all be the same to you a few months into the zombie apocalypse.



ETA... iodized salt or any other salt that isn't 100% sodium chloride can really screw up something you are trying to can or preserve.

So no caking agents, no iodine.etc.


edit on 30-1-2020 by Lumenari because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 08:00 PM
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originally posted by: liejunkie01

originally posted by: Advantage
I dont use a lot of salt.. so we have maybe 4 LBS total. Iodized salt maybe 2 of the 5 lb.. the rest in pink Himalayan and sea. I have probably 20 LBS if we are counting salt rock lamps. LOL! I cant keep my grandson from licking the darn things hardly. I have maybe 8 or 9 lbs of curing salt.. you know pink himalayan and iodized salt arent the best for curing, right? I mean if botulism are something youd like to prevent anyway. www.spiceography.com...


Thank you for that article.

I didnt realize that curing salt was different than any other salt.

Will definitely have to find some of it.


No problem. You can usually find it at a farm adn home store if needed and youre not near the city. Im in Il too.. but unfortunately near St Louis.



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 08:01 PM
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Salt is a long term commodity at a bug in (or a relocated position that is your new base of operations).

Your main use for salt will be meat preservation, so your main supply will be coarse versus fine ground table salt. Also “canning salt” for pickling various vegetables and other items in brine.

Commercial table salt is fine ground with iodine and anti caking additives. Canning salt is only finely ground with no additions. In other words, no different than coarse “rock salt” for salt curing meats. Pro tip: you can grind your own salt with a mortar and pedestal...even if it is just hand picked rocks used for the job.

Salt will be one of those things that will be on the makeshift general stores shelves soon enough in a long term breakdown of society as it is fairly easy to produce and transport. So as a bartering currency, you would need more room than its value to be honest.

But if you want a 40 lbs bag of water softener salt until things settle down, it is $5-$7 and might cure a couple hams. Just be such you get sodium chloride and not potassium chloride



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 08:03 PM
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originally posted by: Ahabstar
Salt is a long term commodity at a bug in (or a relocated position that is your new base of operations).

Your main use for salt will be meat preservation, so your main supply will be coarse versus fine ground table salt. Also “canning salt” for pickling various vegetables and other items in brine.

Commercial table salt is fine ground with iodine and anti caking additives. Canning salt is only finely ground with no additions. In other words, no different than coarse “rock salt” for salt curing meats. Pro tip: you can grind your own salt with a mortar and pedestal...even if it is just hand picked rocks used for the job.

Salt will be one of those things that will be on the makeshift general stores shelves soon enough in a long term breakdown of society as it is fairly easy to produce and transport. So as a bartering currency, you would need more room than its value to be honest.

But if you want a 40 lbs bag of water softener salt until things settle down, it is $5-$7 and might cure a couple hams. Just be such you get sodium chloride and not potassium chloride


Check out the link I just put up about the difference in canning /curing salt and iodized.

edit on 30-1-2020 by Advantage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 08:20 PM
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50 lbs of table salt , 3lbs Maldons sea salt flakes and a couple pounds of pink Himalayan ,a few pounds of celery salt and a few other types



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 08:21 PM
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a reply to: liejunkie01
I got a bunch of these salt rock from Redmond Real Salt Company in Utah. They weigh about 10 lbs each and will last a long time. As of now they are decoration but can use as salt when needed



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 08:22 PM
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originally posted by: Alchemst7
a reply to: liejunkie01
I got a bunch of these salt rock from Redmond Real Salt Company in Utah. They weigh about 10 lbs each and will last a long time. As of now they are decoration but can use as salt when needed




VERY nice!! I like that!



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