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Sounds like they hit someting! - Kobe Bryant

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posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 11:38 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

When your flying in marginal low ceilings, with something that may or may not be IFR capable (instruments) or the fact that you don’t want to get busted going IFR without a flight plan. The last thing you want to do is go IMC (instrument meteorological conditions) especially when mountains or hills are around you, if you do, hope the hell you can out- climb the terrain in front of you! You need to be visual (VMC)with the ground at all times, once into the clouds low level, you must rely solely on instrumentation. No seat of the pants flying especially in a helo, in zero visibility. I’ve scud run too many times in my life that I now refuse to go unless I can either file IFR in a capable aircraft or stay VFR, and the weather is VMC at my destination, not marginal. Once you go into the clouds you loose all situational awareness with the terrain and must rely solely on instruments and the map/gps.


edit on 29-1-2020 by 38181 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 12:02 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: KKLOCO

What drone footage are you referring to? Can you provide a link?





Look up a few posts. It’s my post 6 down from the top on page two.



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 03:11 PM
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I didn't want to say anything a few days ago, but really why does a multi-millionaire fly around in an old 1991 model helicopter? Would you go 70 mph on the interstate in a 1991 model car? Really? A 29 year old car? If that car was not superbly maintained then anything could break at any moment. You'd probably be able to just coast to a stop on the side of the highway. Cool. But a helicopter? It's not like you can just glide to a safe landing or open a door and parachute. If something structural snaps or a motor part breaks the thing is going to go crazy spinning out of control and it is game over for you and everybody else on board. Helicopters are ridiculously dangerous high performance vehicles.



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 03:17 PM
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a reply to: Generation9

I mentioned this in other threads. My best bro has a plane. It’s 65 years old. He maintains the crap out of it. In aviation, it seems they use aircraft for much longer than cars. I would presume it is due to the high cost to produce.

I don’t know about helicopters though.



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 03:28 PM
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a reply to: Generation9

It was a sucky risk and Kobe knew. 79 mph from Anaheim to Burbank in a straight line no traffic and side streets with traffic lights. Point A to B. Faster than on ground doing 120mph in a Lamborghini. As I stated in another post... "roll the dice enough, eventually you'll hit it".

He and his wife were aware of the dangers...
www.businessinsider.com...

He also trusted the pilot very much...( per article ).



"He and Vanessa had a deal that they would never fly on a helicopter together," a source told People magazine. The source added that Bryant would ride in helicopters only if they were piloted by Ara Zobayan, who was the pilot in Sunday's crash and was also killed.



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 03:39 PM
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a reply to: Generation9
Aircraft are not like cars, helicopters require extensive maintenance and most of the moving parts are time limited, once they reach certain hours they are red tagged, destroyed and disposed of and then replaced with new. Matter of fact many of the offshore helicopters you see are completely rebuilt and the only thing that is original is the data plate riveted on the side someplace.



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 09:08 PM
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a reply to: Geek0601

I hear the same sound about 4 seconds after the heavy rotor wash, BUT, I agree it sounds like a stick in the foreground (or something).

What's weird is, the same sound is present in almost every video (audio) at almost the exact same time stamp. It just sounds like a little "tick", but you can picture the helo out of control afterwards. The impact sounds intense! They impacted the ground at a high rate of speed, and then bounced. It sounds gruesome!

Mechanical failure, ground strike, boom strike...something happened before you hear the heavy rotor wash.

And, in my opinion, the helo was out of control after this point.

I don't know the cause, but it seems to me something happened before, or shortly after, you hear the heavy rotor wash and slapping of the rotors.



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 09:18 PM
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a reply to: Geek0601

That's just CHILLING!!



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 09:28 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
Here is some new audio released this morning from doorbell cams in the area. There are two video clips with audio.

If you listen carefully it sounds like the helicopter hits something right before it seems to make a sharp turn (or possible sharp climb) (you hear the rotors really whomping the air. About 16-17 seconds later you hear the crash in the distance. The same sound occurs in both clips at the same duration before the final impact. Sounds to me like they may have hit something (a tree maybe?) and then climbed or turned sharply.

Twitter feed with video clips

Take a listen and see what you think. You can definitely hear the helicopter taking some sort of evasive action.


He tried to climb to gain alt and ran out of air speed. In a helo when you are not moving forward you really can't tell what you are doing in a IMC situation as he then most likely slowly rolled over to lose all lift from his blades and plummet to the ground. No one on board would even know or feel what was happening other than the pilot.


edit on 29-1-2020 by Xtrozero because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 10:30 PM
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Hard for me to imagine IMC in a helo, and being disoriented. Must be scarey as hell!!! (not a rotary rated pilot)

At least IMC in an airplane you've got airspeed and situational awareness (with instruments). Everything is a lot more stable.

Just crazy to think about with a helicopter. Yeah sure, you've still got instruments, but it seems a lot different to me.

Reports are 280+ mph at the time of impact, but from all the video it doesn't sound like they were flying that fast in a straight line. Probably accelerated quickly when they crashed. The impact sounds horrific...BANG!



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 07:33 AM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
Hard for me to imagine IMC in a helo, and being disoriented. Must be scarey as hell!!!


Try it at night, over the ocean with no moon or stars being visible. I was along for that ride. I stood between the pilots and could barely make out the horizon. Between the three of us we kept it in the air until we could see the ship.

We lost a helo in 84. It was the same conditions. Moonless night, overcast over water. Pilot got disoriented, the aircraft struck the water and the co-pilot got it back into the air. The pilot, who was still disoriented was moving the controls at the same time as the co-pilot and they went back into the water. Lost an aircrewman.



posted on Jan, 31 2020 @ 03:52 AM
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a reply to: JIMC5499

Yeah, I can easily picture how a helicopter pilot could become quickly disoriented in IMC.



posted on Jan, 31 2020 @ 07:28 AM
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originally posted by: markymint
But in a heli, a pitch up is nothing without acceleration, isn't it? Meaning, you can pitch up, but you're not going to move upwards without also increasing thrust. And that action would definitely be heard on the audio.

Not a heli, but if we make a bit of a comparison to the Yorba Linda crash audio, you can hear the sound trail off several times (as heard in the Kobe audio just before impact) and that seems to be "regular" flight. Abnormal part of the flight is clearly audible.

My point being, any significant change ie a hard pitch up or down, would likely be noticable in the audio, but it isn't. Regular Doppler effect, not much beyond that.




Really, to me, it seems like the pilot just misjudged the altitude, catastrophically. Finds the target heading, decides to hit the gas but fails to ascend to a safe altitude. Just musing.


The audio in this video is crystal clear.

Thanks for posting.
edit on 1/31/2020 by Riffrafter because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2020 @ 08:27 AM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

But the Yorba Linda crash was an in-flight breakup. Witnesses saw the plane exit the clouds in a steep dive (60 degrees) and attempt to recover before shedding the left stab, then the complete tail and a portion of the left wing. The aircraft then erupted into a ball of fire and crashed. The breakup was likely due to over stressing the airframe trying to recover from the dive. What caused the dive is unclear, but it could have been a number of things including a stall or icing, etc.

Here is the preliminary NTSB report

NTSB Preliminary Report

So I guess I'm not understanding your point, or the quoted poster's point. These are two pretty dramatically different events.



posted on Jan, 31 2020 @ 08:38 AM
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In related news, it is now being reported that the charter company who owned the helicopter involved in the crash has closed its doors. Probably not a big surprise, but it also might indicate some sort of action (suspension, etc.) by the FAA against the company.

The reports indicate that, while the helicopter and the pilot were both instrument rated, the company itself was not certified for flying in IFR conditions. Consequently, the pilot may not have had a lot of IFR time because the company wasn't legally allowed to fly in those conditions.

Island Express Helicopters allegedly not IFR certified


edit on 1/31/2020 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2020 @ 10:13 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Something smells about that. The aircraft WAS IFR capable. The pilot WAS IFR certified. That means that he had his required check rides to hold that certification. This was a charter company, not a scheduled airline. There shouldn't be any issue.

I smell trial lawyers.



posted on Jan, 31 2020 @ 10:13 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Something smells about that. The aircraft WAS IFR capable. The pilot WAS IFR certified. That means that he had his required check rides to hold that certification. This was a charter company, not a scheduled airline. There shouldn't be any issue.

I smell trial lawyers.



posted on Jan, 31 2020 @ 10:13 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Something smells about that. The aircraft WAS IFR capable. The pilot WAS IFR certified. That means that he had his required check rides to hold that certification. This was a charter company, not a scheduled airline. There shouldn't be any issue.

I smell trial lawyers.



posted on Jan, 31 2020 @ 10:13 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Something smells about that. The aircraft WAS IFR capable. The pilot WAS IFR certified. That means that he had his required check rides to hold that certification. This was a charter company, not a scheduled airline. There shouldn't be any issue.

I smell trial lawyers.



posted on Jan, 31 2020 @ 12:51 PM
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a reply to: JIMC5499

That's what I was saying! Both the pilot and the help were IFR certified.

The charter company was not.



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