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CA Homeless Crisis

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posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 12:27 PM
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a reply to: Stupidsecrets

Do you live in CA?
If not, why do even care?




posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 12:32 PM
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originally posted by: Bigbrooklyn
Well said and spot on...we have a big problem here in Vegas...The politicians want to arrest the homeless because of their presence and visual affect on the tourism industry... I have a solutiin and have started a grass root effort to make a difference...assuming the politicians dont have shares in private prison corporations..
a reply to: Boadicea


Good luck and brightest blessings in your efforts. That's pretty awesome Let me know how it goes, please? I'd love hearing about it and what works and what doesn't and whatever you have to share!

And for what it's worth, here's hoping private prisons go the way of the dodo bird... damn parasites on society...



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 12:42 PM
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I'm shocked at how many people still think mental illness and drug addiction are the main causes of homelessness... it's not.

Homelessness in America: Overview of Data and Causes

According to the most recent annual survey by the U.S. Conference of Mayors, major cities across the country report that top causes of homelessness among families were: (1) lack of affordable housing, (2) unemployment, (3) poverty, and (4) lowwages, in that order.42The same report found that the top four causes of homelessness among unaccompanied individuals were (1) lack of affordable housing, (2) unemployment, (3) poverty, (4) mental illness and the lack of needed services, and (5) substance abuse and the lack of needed services


Lack of Affordable Housing Remains the Leading Cause of Homelessness

Causes Of Homelessness

The problem is a lack of affordable housing... because we have a rigged playing field!
edit on 29-1-2020 by Boadicea because: formatting



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 01:52 PM
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originally posted by: Boadicea
I'm shocked at how many people still think mental illness and drug addiction are the main causes of homelessness... it's not.

Homelessness in America: Overview of Data and Causes

According to the most recent annual survey by the U.S. Conference of Mayors, major cities across the country report that top causes of homelessness among families were: (1) lack of affordable housing, (2) unemployment, (3) poverty, and (4) lowwages, in that order.42The same report found that the top four causes of homelessness among unaccompanied individuals were (1) lack of affordable housing, (2) unemployment, (3) poverty, (4) mental illness and the lack of needed services, and (5) substance abuse and the lack of needed services


Lack of Affordable Housing Remains the Leading Cause of Homelessness

Causes Of Homelessness

The problem is a lack of affordable housing... because we have a rigged playing field!


I'm always shocked when people don't understand basic stats and how to identify propaganda...

The first study you linked to blames homelessness on Extremely Low Income... what they neglect to do is actually get into why someone has extremely low income. For example, a drug addict has extremely low income and thus can't afford to rent or do anything. It isn't their low income that is the problem, it is their drug use.... the low income is a function of the drug use.

I hate having to do homework for people. The vast majority of homeless (as defined by standing on a corner with a cardboard sign or living in a tent city) are in fact drug addicts and mental cases.

By trying to lump in "families" ... i.e., woman argues with boyfriend and gets kicked out of house and sleeps in a shelter for a day or two with 5 year old as the same thing as the meth head shooting up under the free way, we will never solve this crisis because you are working from flawed data and assumptions.

The two demographics are not remotely the same...



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 02:13 PM
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Many thanks to you... I'll do a follow up on my progress or lack of... I can say it will be sustainable and low cost by repurposing many materials we throw out on a daily basis. It will take a coalition of those already involved assuming ego and politics play a little role and not a grand one. Faith based groups will play a major role...a reply to: Boadicea



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 02:27 PM
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Since 07's era of a collapsed housing market and fraud the real estate biz is booming.. Affordable housing is a term no different to being half pregnant... Just a play on words with no value.. God isnt making any more land an to suggest we should have affordable housing in a society where supply and demand dictates our economy is a pipe dream. a reply to: Boadicea



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 02:27 PM
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Since 07's era of a collapsed housing market and fraud the real estate biz is booming.. Affordable housing is a term no different to being half pregnant... Just a play on words with no value.. God isnt making any more land an to suggest we should have affordable housing in a society where supply and demand dictates our economy is a pipe dream. a reply to: Boadicea



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 02:37 PM
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a reply to: Edumakated

Propaganda indeed.

Yes, it did address extreme low income as a factor among many. It also addressed the difficulty in defining and quantifying "homelessness," such as in terms of chronic vs (hopefully) temporary homelessness. The mentally ill and drug addicted would be among those usually considered chronic, and least able -- and therefore most likely -- to reject any conditions or restrictions required for getting help. Some counts only include those sleeping "rough" or on the streets, others count those who have found temporary help in shelters or refuges. It certainly doesn't count those who are subsisting on the good graces of friends and family who put them up until they can get back on their feet. Nor are those who move from campground to campground, or motel to motel, etc., adequately counted.

Noting distinctions and patterns is the first step in identifying problems... and their solutions.

Glossing over significant distinctions and patterns only escalates and perpetuates the problems.



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 02:55 PM
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originally posted by: ATruGod
So Your answer is Jail for the Homeless? Very compassionate of You.

Although the OP did say prison, I don't think he meant put them 'ion prison', more like, provide a structuired place where they can live without being a danger to society - and yes, that situation is extremely dangersou to society, and the individuals who have to live in/around it.



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 03:48 PM
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A danger to society are those repeatedly getting reelected and those who elect them... a reply to: tanstaafl



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 04:13 PM
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originally posted by: Bigbrooklyn
A danger to society are those repeatedly getting reelected and those who elect them... a reply to: tanstaafl

True, but that is another problem entirely...



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 04:21 PM
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Not really... Those in charge have been for a long time... They have no answers or perhaps no desire to do so... Fresh blood equals fresh ideas. Term limits?a reply to: tanstaafl



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 06:05 PM
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a reply to: Boadicea

You'd be shocked at how often lack of affordable housing and unemployment accompany a drug problem and for obvious reason. Then those are rapidly followed by poverty, again for obvious reasons. And if you can never hold down a job for long because you have a substance abuse issue, then low wages will be your constant companion because you'll never get beyond entry level which feeds the other issues listed.

Mental health works in the same ways.

So none of the factors you listed are at all independent of addiction and mental illness.



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 06:06 PM
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a reply to: Stupidsecrets

If you pander to them, they will come. If you stop pandering, they will leave.



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 06:31 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6
a reply to: Stupidsecrets

If you pander to them, they will come. If you stop pandering, they will leave.



That is well said.

Take out the single men's homeless shelters and keep the family homeless shelters. You'll see how quickly those that want to work will find work. (maybe)



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 06:33 PM
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a reply to: musicismagic

Generally, it's going to be individualized. For the most part, the ones who are on temporary hard times will make use of resources to get back on their feet quickly. For them, it's a temporary condition usually.

For the chronic ones, you're looking at a bunch of compounding factors, and none of them are easy to address. But each person would require an individual approach, and they would have to want to change themselves to get out of homelessness as much as you want to help them.



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 06:57 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: Boadicea

You'd be shocked at how often lack of affordable housing and unemployment accompany a drug problem and for obvious reason. Then those are rapidly followed by poverty, again for obvious reasons. And if you can never hold down a job for long because you have a substance abuse issue, then low wages will be your constant companion because you'll never get beyond entry level which feeds the other issues listed.

Mental health works in the same ways.


Big sigh. No, I would not be shocked. And I never said otherwise. Exactly the opposite.

Of course mental health issues and drug issues are a part of the problem. But not the whole problem. As I already noted, especially in chronic homelessness on the streets, because those root issues directly effect one's ability to keep a job (as well as competently manage and budget one's money, paying bills on time, etc.).

And let's also remember how expensive healthcare is -- including mental healthcare, which means those with the least ability to get and keep a job, the lowest earning potential, and even higher healthcare costs to cover. Bringing us back to affordability. Affordability is relative to one's circumstances.


So none of the factors you listed are at all independent of addiction and mental illness.


Whether I listed them are not, there are other factors than mental health and drug addiction that negatively impact finances and affordability, including run of the mill health issues that are no one's fault. Accidents with long-term or even lifelong adverse outcomes that impact earning ability. Chronic diseases that make it difficult (or impossible) to hold a job. Being the target of embezzlement or identity theft or any other criminal action that leaves you not only broke, but possibly in debt. An act of nature that destroys everything you have and more. Losing your job -- and your skills and experience -- to automation. Or worse, H1B visa workers. All of the above -- and countless other real life circumstances -- are completely independent of mental health and drug addiction issues.



posted on Jan, 29 2020 @ 09:56 PM
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a reply to: Boadicea

But most of the latter you list have remedies and resources available designed to help you through them. With dedicated work and time, you make it through. Most people interested in helping themselves will make use of the help they receive in turn to turn their lives around eventually.

Chronic issues to your health the prevent work? They're what disability and other low income programs are meant to help. They're the ones our welfare system is supposed to be supporting. So if they're on the streets, why is that? There is simply no reason for it.

As to people taking your job ... that's an immigration issue. Sounds like the borders and immigration need to be addressed.

By and large, people chronically on the streets are there because they aren't actively seeking to change their own circumstances for one reason or another ... or they're just plain stupid (not the most politically correct way to put it, but with all the different programs and resources available and designed for that income group ... if you can't figure it out and how to work it, what else do you call it?). I prefer to lean toward most of the chronically homeless being incapable of productively structuring their lives for one reason or another, usually substance abuse and/or mental illness.



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 08:40 AM
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originally posted by: Bigbrooklyn
Term limits?

The only problem I have with term limits is they are a violation of the free speech and free association clauses.

I'd much prefer a Constitutional Amendment along the lines of the following (it is a WIP, so be gentle, and is part of my personal 'Perfect Constitution' project I'll be posting parts of soon)...

It is based on the saying: "The person who has the gold makes the rules":

"Any and all compensation, including but not limited to salaries & living/office/staff/travel expenditures, for all Members of Congress, are henceforth declared to be the responsibility of their Constituents. Said compensation is to be paid by their Constituents and only their Constituents, through a local committee/organization to be set up for such purposes. Anyone who makes a lawful donation to their Rep/Senators pay/compensation fund is herein granted a full Tax Credit in the amount that they donate, as limited by Congress, but in no case shall ever be less than 50% of the amount donated, or $50,000, whichever is greater."

I can dream, can't I?



posted on Jan, 30 2020 @ 09:13 AM
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The coronavirus will take care of many of the homeless.

If it gets loose in Calif it will spread through the homeless in LA and San Francisco.

lucky i live in a town in the Calif desert, and we never have a flu or other virus outbreak because its so dry out here.
When summer hits the coronavirus will not live on surfaces for minutes needed to transmit.



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